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Re: Types of cellulose ethers

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  • Jake Benson
    My 2 cents: I tried using a carragheenan and surface treated cold-water dispersible HPMC 50-50 mix SPECIFICALLY for marbling with arcylic colors and I really
    Message 1 of 33 , Apr 6 12:07 PM
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      My 2 cents:

      I tried using a carragheenan and surface treated cold-water
      dispersible HPMC 50-50 mix SPECIFICALLY for marbling with arcylic
      colors and I really liked it. Preparing the HPMC was really NO
      TROUBLE at all. Best of all, the size lasted far longer than when
      using just carragheenan alone with acrylics. I just topped up when
      the tank was low, and kept using it for as much as 6 weeks.

      The combination of the two sizes allowed for some of the properties of
      both; the carragheenan allowed for fine-lined details, and I think the
      HPMC better controlled the expansion rate of the acrylics. I did
      have to slightly thin and adjust the paints with surfactant to allow
      for more open time and to get the most detailed lines. It was some
      time ago that I did this, but I marbled both papers and fabrics using
      acrylics available from Faith Harrison at the time. When I do get
      back to an acrylic set-up, I'll likely explore using Golden Fluid
      Acrylics with this combination size.

      That said, when using watercolors, I'll stick with straight
      carragheenan.

      Erik- there was one factor that you left out in your description of
      CMC, and that was the paper that you are using. I wonder if you would
      have less trouble with the shininess if you used a more absorbent
      paper? Also, while the CMC may not be the best for marbling, perhaps
      the CMC would work well as an external coating for your papers, to
      protect them from surface abrasion when used for bookbinding?

      I find that an application of external sizing followed by waxing and
      burnishing makes the papers far more durable, especially around the
      perimeter of the boards. The few books I've not done this too are in
      miserable shape today. In addition, I think that the initial
      application of the external sizing made the subsequent waxing and
      burnishing a whole lot easier. It helps to "seal" the surface, allows
      the wax to be spread more thinly, after which the burnisher glides
      across. Waxing without this step seems to me to make for much harder
      work.

      Jake Benson
    • Sue Cole
      you can get a burnishing stone at Iris Nevins website: Also, Peggy Skycraft sells MicroGlaze, another type of wax
      Message 33 of 33 , Apr 9 4:56 AM
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        you can get a burnishing stone at Iris Nevins website:
        <http://www.marblingpaper.com/marbling3.html>

        Also, Peggy Skycraft sells MicroGlaze, another type of wax at her
        site:
        http://www.skycraft.com/skycraftMicroGlaze.html

        Also, I haven't done it myself, but for very long links, you can go to
        www.tinyurl.com and it will compress it for you for free.
        Sue
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