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Silhouette Paper

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  • senefru1
    I would like to know if there is a difference between the terms Silhouette Paper and Marbled Paper ? if so please explain for me the Silhouette Paper
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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      I would like to know if there is a difference between the
      terms "Silhouette Paper" and "Marbled Paper"?
      if so please explain for me the "Silhouette Paper"
    • Antonio Vélez Celemín
      Marbled paper is a type of painting which consist on the transfer of a pattern made on a bath to a sheet of paper. The instruments used to make the pattern or
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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        Marbled paper is a type of painting which consist on the transfer of a pattern made on a bath to a sheet of paper. The instruments used to make the pattern or design never touches the paper, the whole work is made on the bath.

        There are two differents ways to make silhouette paper. One consist on cutting pieces of leather of the desired shape, dye them and put a paper and the dyed leather togheter under a press or weights. When dry, the paper will have the silhouette of the piece of leather and the color of the dye in this place, being the rest of the paper on the original color of it.
        The other way consist on cutting pieces of paper as stencils which will protect the sheet of silhouette paper when it will receive the dye. In this case the silhouette, the form of the stencils, will have the color of the original paper.

        Silhouette paper was used in Iran in XV century, in this second procedure; both were used in Turkey in XVI and XVII centuries.

        I hope these serves.

        Antonio
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: senefru1
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2008 10:18 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] Silhouette Paper


        I would like to know if there is a difference between the
        terms "Silhouette Paper" and "Marbled Paper"?
        if so please explain for me the "Silhouette Paper"





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • haytham kamal
        Thank you Antonio for this information, I would like to ask if you or anybody have photos of historical ottoman ebru works, because I need it in a thesis thank
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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          Thank you Antonio for this information, I would like to ask if you or anybody have photos of historical ottoman ebru works, because I need it in a thesis

          thank you



          ---------------------------------
          Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Antonio Vélez Celemín
          On www.bnf.fr clic on: catalogues et biblioteque numerique. Then go to: Mandragore and there to: Recherche; then mark: Manuscrits, orientaux, clic on index
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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            On www.bnf.fr clic on: catalogues et biblioteque numerique. Then go to: Mandragore and there to: Recherche; then mark: Manuscrits, orientaux, clic on index and look for Arabe 169, Arabe 6076 and Arabe 6077 you can find there some silhouette papers and a lot of ottoman Ebru borders for miniature painting. Perhaps the resolution will be enough for your needs.

            Antonio
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: haytham kamal
            To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2008 11:05 AM
            Subject: Re: [Marbling] Silhouette Paper


            Thank you Antonio for this information, I would like to ask if you or anybody have photos of historical ottoman ebru works, because I need it in a thesis

            thank you

            ---------------------------------
            Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • haytham kamal
            Dear Antonio, Again, useful information, god bless you Haytham. ... Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. [Non-text
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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              Dear Antonio,
              Again, useful information, god bless you

              Haytham.



              ---------------------------------
              Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jake Benson
              3zizi Hadratak Haytham! This long message was written by me to help expand upon the description that Antonio posted, with some added observations about
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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                '3zizi Hadratak Haytham!

                This long message was written by me to help expand upon the
                description that Antonio posted, with some added observations about
                "silhouette" papers.

                "Silhouette paper" as we call it in English, is one method of
                stenciling known by the terms "kaghez-i 'aksi" or "akkaseh" in
                Persian, which is spelled "akkase" in Modern Turkish. The word is
                derived from the Arabic word 'aks meaning "negative" "contrary"
                "opposite" or "contrast", and in this case can be interpreted to mean
                "reflection". Various Turkish sources (based on the writings of
                Mehmet Ali Kagitçi) have reported that the word means "white bowl",
                but this is erroneous as this latter word is spelled completely
                differently in Arabic script. Interestingly enough today in Iran,
                this term is commonly used to refer to photography, likely due to the
                process of using negative film.

                This term was used in India as well as Iran and Turkey, and is a very
                broadly used for all methods of stenciled designs. There are really 3
                different methods of stenciling found in Islamic decorative papers:

                1) Cut paper is placed on a paper and colors are finely sprinkled over
                top, and then the stencil is removed.

                2) Cut paper, leather, or even possible fabric is soaked in dye, and 2
                sheets of paper are pressed together as a sandwich around the stencil.

                3) Color is wiped or blotted through a cut paper stencil, in a
                "pochoir" method. The stencil which may or may not be reinforced in
                some manner.

                (Then there is the additional method of combining stencils with
                marbling!)

                In addition, it is very common to find the designs produced by all of
                these methods can be seen outlined in ink, color, or gold, or in some
                cases, even overpainted.

                The information that Antonio gave about using cut leather soaked with
                dye to produce such papers came from a description provided by the
                late Turkish bookbinder Emin Barin to Albert Haemmerle. There is no
                actual textual source for the method he described, and it is not known
                whether he actually reproduced such designs himself, as the production
                of such papers had clearly died out by that point in time. I think he
                was simply offering his thought based on his own observations. See
                Haemmerle's Buntpapier, page 37, footnote 5, and on page 38. That
                said, it was this particular form of "impressed" stencil are what can
                be found in European Alba Amicora of the late 16th-17th centuries. I
                am not aware that the other "sprinkled" and "pochoir" methods were
                collected by European travelers in these albums.

                Barin attributed the invention of this impressed paper to Central Asia
                and cited two manuscripts, but did not provide an actual reference or
                accession number. Whether these manuscripts were produced using the
                "impressed" or the "sprinkled" method remains to be determined. Many
                examples of the "sprinkled" method can be found n 15th century
                manuscripts, but I have yet to see any made through the "impressed"
                method from before the 16th century. I think that this "sprinkled"
                method is the oldest method. It appears to have been developed during
                the late Timurid dynasty in workshops in Central Asia, principally
                Herat, especially during the reign of Sultan Husayn al Bayqara. While
                there is no textual source describing the method, this can be observed
                in many manuscripts, especially safina or jung anthologies from the
                15th- 17th c. In Central Asia, Iran, and Turkey. I've yet to see one
                of Indian production.

                According to Yves Porter, the process is mentioned in a Persian text
                from India, entitled "Risala-ye Jeld Sazi". There is a problematic
                term for the material mentioned in a critical edition of the text-
                "kasanbi" or "kasambi". Porter thinks it may an Indian word for a
                kind of safflower-dyed starch cloth. See Porter's book Paintere,
                Paintings, and Books" pp 51-2. he also mentions that the term
                "kaghez-i 'Aksi" together with "Kaghez-i Abri" is mentioned in the
                Persian dictionary Me'at ul Istilah of Anand Ram Mokhles.

                The other methods of stenciling were created by sprinkling very fine
                drops of color over a cut paper stencil, and then in another different
                procedure, there appears to be a kind of tampon used to press color
                directly over the stencil, akin to the French method of "pochoir".
                This latter method seems to have further developed in India in the
                16th century, as a number of borders associated with the atelier of
                'Abdur Rahim Khan-e Khanan. These elaborate multi-colored borders are
                known as "'Aks-i Haft Rang " or "Seven Colored Stencil" designs. For
                more information, please see the appendix devoted to this subject in
                "Mughal Art and Patronage" by John Seyller.

                From my own observations, I think that in the first "impressed"
                method, two papers were pressed around the cut stencils. If you have
                the opportunity to view album amicora, you can see that there are
                reflecting designs. In some, the color "squished" out and the image
                is blurred, whereas in other cases, the impression is incomplete- and
                a range of impression in between.

                In addition, I also wonder if these really were executed using
                leather, as described by Barin. It depends on the kind of leather ,
                of course, but most would become to malleable and even expand or
                become stretchy when whetted, so they would not retain their original
                form after cutting. For this reason, I think that a thicker, sized
                paper may have been used, as it would not expand in the manner that
                leather does. The colors are always dyes, not pigments, and almost
                always seem to be a red dye, possibly kirmiz, madder, brasilwood, or
                lotur; a golden yellow dye possibly made from saffron or safflower;
                and a green dye that is may be made from copper verdigris. Of the top
                of my head, i have not seen blue used, likely from indigo used, but it
                may have been that a combination of indigo and yellow was used to make
                the green color.

                In connection with this discussion, I have often wondered how we have
                come to use the term"silhouette" for this "impressed" kind of
                stenciled paper. Haemmerle does not appear to use this term, but
                "schablonierens", a term meaning "stencils (If Susanne Krause is
                reading this, please feel free to add your own observations and
                correct me if I'm wrong). Just how we came to call this paper
                "silhouette" is a mystery. I had thought that Rosamond Loring used
                the term, but after checking, I found that she did not. So that makes
                me wonder if possibly Olga Hirsch was the first to employ this term.
                In any case, it is actually a very recent practice, and one that I
                think we should reconsider for several reasons. The term
                "silhouette" is a bit misleading, as the European and American
                traditions of cut paper silhouettes is very common and very distinct;
                it has nothing to do with these Eastern papers. Next, we do have an
                actual term used in Persian and Turkish for this paper, and it doesn't
                translate as "silhouette" at all, but "stencil".

                Here are some examples of the "sprinkled" variety:

                http://expositions.bnf.fr/splendeurs/grand/3-55cd.htm

                http://expositions.bnf.fr/splendeurs/grand/5-121ab.htm

                The "impressed" or "silhouette" variety

                http://classes.bnf.fr/dossisup/grands/138.htm
                http://expositions.bnf.fr/livrarab/grands/048b.htm

                The images from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (both stenciled
                and marbled) have all been published in a few catalogs. Have you been
                able to visit Philip Croom at the AUC Rare Book & Special Collection
                Library? I think they have these books:

                "L'art du livre arabe : du manuscrit au livre d'artiste"
                http://worldcat.org/oclc/51722494&referer=brief_results

                "Splendeurs persanes : manuscrits du XIIe au XVIIe siècle"
                http://worldcat.org/oclc/38507388&referer=brief_results

                "Soliman le Magnifique : [catalogue de l'exposition présentée du] 15
                février au 14 mai 1990, Galeries nationales du Grand Palais."
                http://worldcat.org/oclc/22854149&referer=brief_results

                Also, there are more examples that had been posted in the Swedish
                National Library site, but they have been removed. You can still see
                the images if you visit www.archives.org and enter these URLs into the
                search box:

                http://www.kb.se/HS/islam/eng/marmorerat.htm
                http://www.kb.se/HS/islam/stambok.jpg
                http://www.kb.se/HS/islam/cod_or_52.htm

                There is one image of the "pochoir" method online. They are found in
                the borders of one of the stencil-marbled paintings of a "nag" or
                starving horse, that was auctioned at Sotheby's in 2002.

                http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/lot/LotDetail.jsp?lot_id=PXPQ

                The image is also found in the folder for this group 'Marbled
                Antiquaria at Auction"

                http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/photos/browse/165b

                http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/photos/view/165b?b=1

                Finally, here is something very special, just for you Haytham. There
                is an image from the Bibliothèque Nationale of an Arabic and Coptic
                Christian manuscript that uses a similar, Ottoman style border. It is
                very intriguing for many reasons:

                http://expositions.bnf.fr/livrarab/grands/076.htm

                Whether or not this paper is of actual Masri manufacture is debatable
                though. There is no specific evidence that has come to light to show
                that this method of decorative paper was ever produced in Egypt. The
                paper could have been made elsewhere and imported. Nevertheless,
                There are earlier examples of what may be stenciled leather designs
                used for doublures (internal covers) in Mamluk bookbindings. Some
                have said that these doublures were block-printed, but I have not
                personally observed any sign of impression.

                Perhaps this is a topic that you can research more? The Director of
                the Islamic Museum in Cairo told me that a woman at Cairo University
                produced her thesis on Mamluk bookbinding. Unfortunately, I cannot
                find my notes with this information, and I was not able to obtain a
                copy of the book anyway; perhaps you can find it and see if there is
                anything helpful to you? In any case, please let me know the citation
                if you should find it.

                Insh'allah hadha mas3dat leek!

                m3a salamah,

                Jake Benson
              • Office
                Also see and read about the work of the late Christopher Weinmann in Ink & Gall Volume V Number 2 Fine Print Volume Nine, Number Four Christopher Weinman
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 23, 2008
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                  Also see and read about the work of the late Christopher Weinmann in

                  Ink & Gall Volume V Number 2

                  Fine Print Volume Nine, Number Four

                  Christopher Weinman A Tribute


                  charles
                  +.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+
                  L. A Book Arts, Inc.
                  Custom Bindery / Krause Intaglio
                  321 West Torrance Blvd. Suite A
                  Carson, CA 90745
                  310.217.0400
                  +.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+

                  On Mar 23, 2008, at 1:18 PM, Jake Benson wrote:

                  > '3zizi Hadratak Haytham!
                  >
                  > This long message was written by me to help expand upon the
                  > description that Antonio posted, with some added observations about
                  > "silhouette" papers.
                  >
                  > "Silhouette paper" as we call it in English, is one method of
                  > stenciling known by the terms "kaghez-i 'aksi" or "akkaseh" in
                  > Persian, which is spelled "akkase" in Modern Turkish. The word is
                  > derived from the Arabic word 'aks meaning "negative" "contrary"
                  > "opposite" or "contrast", and in this case can be interpreted to mean
                  > "reflection". Various Turkish sources (based on the writings of
                  > Mehmet Ali Kagitçi) have reported that the word means "white bowl",
                  > but this is erroneous as this latter word is spelled completely
                  > differently in Arabic script. Interestingly enough today in Iran,
                  > this term is commonly used to refer to photography, likely due to the
                  > process of using negative film.
                  >
                  > This term was used in India as well as Iran and Turkey, and is a very
                  > broadly used for all methods of stenciled designs. There are really 3
                  > different methods of stenciling found in Islamic decorative papers:
                  >
                  > 1) Cut paper is placed on a paper and colors are finely sprinkled over
                  > top, and then the stencil is removed.
                  >
                  > 2) Cut paper, leather, or even possible fabric is soaked in dye, and 2
                  > sheets of paper are pressed together as a sandwich around the stencil.
                  >
                  > 3) Color is wiped or blotted through a cut paper stencil, in a
                  > "pochoir" method. The stencil which may or may not be reinforced in
                  > some manner.
                  >
                  > (Then there is the additional method of combining stencils with
                  > marbling!)
                  >
                  > In addition, it is very common to find the designs produced by all of
                  > these methods can be seen outlined in ink, color, or gold, or in some
                  > cases, even overpainted.
                  >
                  > The information that Antonio gave about using cut leather soaked with
                  > dye to produce such papers came from a description provided by the
                  > late Turkish bookbinder Emin Barin to Albert Haemmerle. There is no
                  > actual textual source for the method he described, and it is not known
                  > whether he actually reproduced such designs himself, as the production
                  > of such papers had clearly died out by that point in time. I think he
                  > was simply offering his thought based on his own observations. See
                  > Haemmerle's Buntpapier, page 37, footnote 5, and on page 38. That
                  > said, it was this particular form of "impressed" stencil are what can
                  > be found in European Alba Amicora of the late 16th-17th centuries. I
                  > am not aware that the other "sprinkled" and "pochoir" methods were
                  > collected by European travelers in these albums.
                  >
                  > Barin attributed the invention of this impressed paper to Central Asia
                  > and cited two manuscripts, but did not provide an actual reference or
                  > accession number. Whether these manuscripts were produced using the
                  > "impressed" or the "sprinkled" method remains to be determined. Many
                  > examples of the "sprinkled" method can be found n 15th century
                  > manuscripts, but I have yet to see any made through the "impressed"
                  > method from before the 16th century. I think that this "sprinkled"
                  > method is the oldest method. It appears to have been developed during
                  > the late Timurid dynasty in workshops in Central Asia, principally
                  > Herat, especially during the reign of Sultan Husayn al Bayqara. While
                  > there is no textual source describing the method, this can be observed
                  > in many manuscripts, especially safina or jung anthologies from the
                  > 15th- 17th c. In Central Asia, Iran, and Turkey. I've yet to see one
                  > of Indian production.
                  >
                  > According to Yves Porter, the process is mentioned in a Persian text
                  > from India, entitled "Risala-ye Jeld Sazi". There is a problematic
                  > term for the material mentioned in a critical edition of the text-
                  > "kasanbi" or "kasambi". Porter thinks it may an Indian word for a
                  > kind of safflower-dyed starch cloth. See Porter's book Paintere,
                  > Paintings, and Books" pp 51-2. he also mentions that the term
                  > "kaghez-i 'Aksi" together with "Kaghez-i Abri" is mentioned in the
                  > Persian dictionary Me'at ul Istilah of Anand Ram Mokhles.
                  >
                  > The other methods of stenciling were created by sprinkling very fine
                  > drops of color over a cut paper stencil, and then in another different
                  > procedure, there appears to be a kind of tampon used to press color
                  > directly over the stencil, akin to the French method of "pochoir".
                  > This latter method seems to have further developed in India in the
                  > 16th century, as a number of borders associated with the atelier of
                  > 'Abdur Rahim Khan-e Khanan. These elaborate multi-colored borders are
                  > known as "'Aks-i Haft Rang " or "Seven Colored Stencil" designs. For
                  > more information, please see the appendix devoted to this subject in
                  > "Mughal Art and Patronage" by John Seyller.
                  >
                  > From my own observations, I think that in the first "impressed"
                  > method, two papers were pressed around the cut stencils. If you have
                  > the opportunity to view album amicora, you can see that there are
                  > reflecting designs. In some, the color "squished" out and the image
                  > is blurred, whereas in other cases, the impression is incomplete- and
                  > a range of impression in between.
                  >
                  > In addition, I also wonder if these really were executed using
                  > leather, as described by Barin. It depends on the kind of leather ,
                  > of course, but most would become to malleable and even expand or
                  > become stretchy when whetted, so they would not retain their original
                  > form after cutting. For this reason, I think that a thicker, sized
                  > paper may have been used, as it would not expand in the manner that
                  > leather does. The colors are always dyes, not pigments, and almost
                  > always seem to be a red dye, possibly kirmiz, madder, brasilwood, or
                  > lotur; a golden yellow dye possibly made from saffron or safflower;
                  > and a green dye that is may be made from copper verdigris. Of the top
                  > of my head, i have not seen blue used, likely from indigo used, but it
                  > may have been that a combination of indigo and yellow was used to make
                  > the green color.
                  >
                  > In connection with this discussion, I have often wondered how we have
                  > come to use the term"silhouette" for this "impressed" kind of
                  > stenciled paper. Haemmerle does not appear to use this term, but
                  > "schablonierens", a term meaning "stencils (If Susanne Krause is
                  > reading this, please feel free to add your own observations and
                  > correct me if I'm wrong). Just how we came to call this paper
                  > "silhouette" is a mystery. I had thought that Rosamond Loring used
                  > the term, but after checking, I found that she did not. So that makes
                  > me wonder if possibly Olga Hirsch was the first to employ this term.
                  > In any case, it is actually a very recent practice, and one that I
                  > think we should reconsider for several reasons. The term
                  > "silhouette" is a bit misleading, as the European and American
                  > traditions of cut paper silhouettes is very common and very distinct;
                  > it has nothing to do with these Eastern papers. Next, we do have an
                  > actual term used in Persian and Turkish for this paper, and it doesn't
                  > translate as "silhouette" at all, but "stencil".
                  >
                  > Here are some examples of the "sprinkled" variety:
                  >
                  > http://expositions.bnf.fr/splendeurs/grand/3-55cd.htm
                  >
                  > http://expositions.bnf.fr/splendeurs/grand/5-121ab.htm
                  >
                  > The "impressed" or "silhouette" variety
                  >
                  > http://classes.bnf.fr/dossisup/grands/138.htm
                  > http://expositions.bnf.fr/livrarab/grands/048b.htm
                  >
                  > The images from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (both stenciled
                  > and marbled) have all been published in a few catalogs. Have you been
                  > able to visit Philip Croom at the AUC Rare Book & Special Collection
                  > Library? I think they have these books:
                  >
                  > "L'art du livre arabe : du manuscrit au livre d'artiste"
                  > http://worldcat.org/oclc/51722494&referer=brief_results
                  >
                  > "Splendeurs persanes : manuscrits du XIIe au XVIIe siècle"
                  > http://worldcat.org/oclc/38507388&referer=brief_results
                  >
                  > "Soliman le Magnifique : [catalogue de l'exposition
                  > présentée du] 15
                  > février au 14 mai 1990, Galeries nationales du Grand Palais."
                  > http://worldcat.org/oclc/22854149&referer=brief_results
                  >
                  > Also, there are more examples that had been posted in the Swedish
                  > National Library site, but they have been removed. You can still see
                  > the images if you visit www.archives.org and enter these URLs into the
                  > search box:
                  >
                  > http://www.kb.se/HS/islam/eng/marmorerat.htm
                  > http://www.kb.se/HS/islam/stambok.jpg
                  > http://www.kb.se/HS/islam/cod_or_52.htm
                  >
                  > There is one image of the "pochoir" method online. They are found in
                  > the borders of one of the stencil-marbled paintings of a "nag" or
                  > starving horse, that was auctioned at Sotheby's in 2002.
                  >
                  > http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/lot/LotDetail.jsp?lot_id=PXPQ
                  >
                  > The image is also found in the folder for this group 'Marbled
                  > Antiquaria at Auction"
                  >
                  > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/photos/browse/165b
                  >
                  > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling/photos/view/165b?b=1
                  >
                  > Finally, here is something very special, just for you Haytham. There
                  > is an image from the Bibliothèque Nationale of an Arabic and Coptic
                  > Christian manuscript that uses a similar, Ottoman style border. It is
                  > very intriguing for many reasons:
                  >
                  > http://expositions.bnf.fr/livrarab/grands/076.htm
                  >
                  > Whether or not this paper is of actual Masri manufacture is debatable
                  > though. There is no specific evidence that has come to light to show
                  > that this method of decorative paper was ever produced in Egypt. The
                  > paper could have been made elsewhere and imported. Nevertheless,
                  > There are earlier examples of what may be stenciled leather designs
                  > used for doublures (internal covers) in Mamluk bookbindings. Some
                  > have said that these doublures were block-printed, but I have not
                  > personally observed any sign of impression.
                  >
                  > Perhaps this is a topic that you can research more? The Director of
                  > the Islamic Museum in Cairo told me that a woman at Cairo University
                  > produced her thesis on Mamluk bookbinding. Unfortunately, I cannot
                  > find my notes with this information, and I was not able to obtain a
                  > copy of the book anyway; perhaps you can find it and see if there is
                  > anything helpful to you? In any case, please let me know the citation
                  > if you should find it.
                  >
                  > Insh'allah hadha mas3dat leek!
                  >
                  > m3a salamah,
                  >
                  > Jake Benson
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jake Benson
                  Thank you Charles, A digital prospectus for this book was prepared and is available for group members to download. It is available in the files section of
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 26, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thank you Charles,

                    A digital prospectus for this book was prepared and is available for
                    group members to download. It is available in the "files" section of
                    the group web site, and is entitled "RevisedWeimannProspectus2007-
                    lowres.pdf"

                    This book is still available from Ingrid Weimann.

                    Jake Benson


                    --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, Office <typenut@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Also see and read about the work of the late Christopher Weinmann in
                    >
                    > Ink & Gall Volume V Number 2
                    >
                    > Fine Print Volume Nine, Number Four
                    >
                    > Christopher Weinman A Tribute
                    >
                    >
                    > charles
                    > +.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+.+
                    > L. A Book Arts, Inc.
                    > Custom Bindery / Krause Intaglio
                    > 321 West Torrance Blvd. Suite A
                    > Carson, CA 90745
                    > 310.217.0400
                    >
                  • yesim goktepe
                    hi all I want to invite all of you to our marbling exhibition, If you join us we ll be very glad sincerelly Yeşim Göktepe ... Yahoo! kullaniyor musunuz?
                    Message 9 of 10 , Mar 27, 2008
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                      hi all
                      I want to invite all of you to our marbling exhibition,
                      If you join us we'll be very glad
                      sincerelly Yeşim Göktepe






                      ---------------------------------
                      Yahoo! kullaniyor musunuz?
                      Istenmeyen postadan biktiniz mi? Istenmeyen postadan en iyi korunma Yahoo! Posta'da
                      http://tr.mail.yahoo.com

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • yesim goktepe
                      I m sorry about my message there was not added exhibition file in my message. yesim goktepe wrote: hi all I
                      Message 10 of 10 , Mar 27, 2008
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                        I'm sorry about my message there was not added exhibition file in my message.

                        yesim goktepe <yesim63@...> wrote: hi all
                        I want to invite all of you to our marbling exhibition,
                        If you join us we'll be very glad
                        sincerelly Yeşim Göktepe




                        ---------------------------------
                        Yahoo! kullaniyor musunuz?
                        Istenmeyen postadan biktiniz mi? Istenmeyen postadan en iyi korunma Yahoo! Posta'da
                        http://tr.mail.yahoo.com

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                        ---------------------------------
                        Yahoo! kullaniyor musunuz?
                        Istenmeyen postadan biktiniz mi? Istenmeyen postadan en iyi korunma Yahoo! Posta'da
                        http://tr.mail.yahoo.com

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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