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Re: Types of cellulose ethers

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  • Jake Benson
    Hi Susanne, I just asked a friend who worked for them for some years, and he said that they actually used boiled carragheen moss for size, but they did use oil
    Message 1 of 33 , Feb 23 9:47 AM
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      Hi Susanne,

      I just asked a friend who worked for them for some years, and he said
      that they actually used boiled carragheen moss for size, but they did
      use oil colors and oil-based printing inks.

      Natural Carragheen moss contains three distinct types of gels,
      designated by a different Greek letter; Kappa, Iota, and Lambda.
      Kappa and Iota are less soluble and tend to form very viscous, even
      solid gels. The powdered carragheenan extract that is generally sold
      for marbling here in the US is refined lambda, which is a very fine
      gel that never really solidifies.

      Jake

      --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, susanne martin <alavee15@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > I think that maybe the people at Il Papiro in Italy also use this,
      their sizing is very thick.
      >
      > Susanne
      >
      >
      > To: Marbling@...: jemiljan@...: Fri, 22 Feb 2008 16:08:43
      +0000Subject: [Marbling] Re: Types of cellulose ethers
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Erik,>I've heard that Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC) is great for
      marbling.Did the person who told you this mention what kind of paints
      they wereusing? Much as MC HPMC and HMC have various kinds and grades,
      so does CMC. There is a kind made that is so viscous, it is used as a
      buildingmaterial and in architectural restoration. While I've never
      used it for any method of marbling, I do know paperconservators who
      use certain types of Sodium CMC in very low solutionsas as an
      adhesive. <http://aic.stanford.edu/sg/bpg/annual/v01/bp01-04.html>I
      have the impression that it is a lot more viscous and also also
      morepolar, which may limit the paint that is used to oil. In fact,
      Ithink that Asco marbling, a kind of oil-color method developed
      byartists at the Ascona School in Switzerland, is made on such a
      viscoussizing. If you try it out, let us know how it goes! Jake
      Benson--- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Erik Haagensen" <erik@>
      wrote:>> I've heard that Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC) is great for
      marbling.> Can anyone confirm this ??> ... or give comments>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • Sue Cole
      you can get a burnishing stone at Iris Nevins website: Also, Peggy Skycraft sells MicroGlaze, another type of wax
      Message 33 of 33 , Apr 9, 2008
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        you can get a burnishing stone at Iris Nevins website:
        <http://www.marblingpaper.com/marbling3.html>

        Also, Peggy Skycraft sells MicroGlaze, another type of wax at her
        site:
        http://www.skycraft.com/skycraftMicroGlaze.html

        Also, I haven't done it myself, but for very long links, you can go to
        www.tinyurl.com and it will compress it for you for free.
        Sue
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