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Re: Suminagashi

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  • David Sandow
    Jill-Try this one: http://www.suminagashi.com/history.html It s by Diane Maurer diving horse http://community.webtv.net/divinghorse/THEDIVINGHORSESTUDIO
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2000
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    • ewcc@earthlink.net
      Friends, I am an art historian in Los Angeles, and am interested in researching the history of sumniagashi in Japan. When was this craft started? Does it have
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 25, 2001
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        Friends,

        I am an art historian in Los Angeles, and am interested in researching
        the history of sumniagashi in Japan. When was this craft started? Does
        it have any spiritual or philosophical affiliations? Was it considered
        an art or a craft (if this dintinction was valid at all at the time of
        its origin)? Does it have any influence on modern or contemporary
        practices of art? These are some of the questions I am interested in
        finding answers to. Can you send me in the right direction?

        Thank you,
        Sincerely,
        Debashish Banerji
      • sixshort@yahoo.com.au
        -Hi, art historian - what would we do without you? The two best books I have found on suminagashi, currently available, are Suminagashi, an Introduction to
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 25, 2001
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          -Hi, art historian - what would we do without you? The two best
          books I have found on suminagashi, currently available,
          are "Suminagashi, an Introduction to Japanese Marbling" written by
          Don Guyot, Brass Galley Press, Seattle, and available from Colophon.
          The other is by Anne Chambers, and was recommended to me by one of
          Japan's leading suminagashi artists Tadao Fukuda, whose work appears
          in the book - "Suminagashi, the Japanese Art of Marbling, a Practical
          Guide" Thames & Hudson Ltd. London. This marvelous forum will
          doubtless provide you with heaps more information from far more
          knowledgable people. Hope it helps anyway, Regards, Joan Ajala
        • Laura Sims
          Dear Debashish, You may also want to check out the translation of Suminagashi-Zome by Tokutaro Yagi printed by Heyek Press at 25 Patrol Court, Woodside,
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 28, 2001
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            Dear Debashish,

            You may also want to check out the translation of
            Suminagashi-Zome by Tokutaro Yagi printed by Heyek
            Press at 25 Patrol Court, Woodside, California 94062.
            It is about $25 and gives technical information. In
            1914 an aging Tokutaro Yagi had no mail heir and was
            afriad that his knowledge would be lost. He dictated
            the book to a teacher who transcribed it. It was
            first printed in English in 1991.

            Also, Einen Miura will have a slide lecture on Ink
            Stick Suminagashi and demonstration at the
            International Marblers' Gathering 2002. Contact me
            for more information if interested at
            indigostone2@....

            Best Regards,
            Laura Sims
            Indigo Stone
            --- ewcc@... wrote:
            > Friends,
            >
            > I am an art historian in Los Angeles, and am
            > interested in researching
            > the history of sumniagashi in Japan. When was this
            > craft started? Does
            > it have any spiritual or philosophical affiliations?
            > Was it considered
            > an art or a craft (if this dintinction was valid at
            > all at the time of
            > its origin)? Does it have any influence on modern or
            > contemporary
            > practices of art? These are some of the questions I
            > am interested in
            > finding answers to. Can you send me in the right
            > direction?
            >
            > Thank you,
            > Sincerely,
            > Debashish Banerji
            >
            >


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          • Milena Hughes
            Hi All- Badly wrenched back this weekend...thus, time to read and respond: I have taught many suminagashi courses. Boku Undo colors work well once adjusted.
            Message 5 of 6 , May 12 9:20 AM
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              Hi All-
              Badly wrenched back this weekend...thus, time to read and respond:
              I have taught many suminagashi courses. "Boku Undo" colors work well
              once adjusted. Chinese paint chips (Colophon Book Arts) dissolved in
              water also work well and are considered to be the traditional form of
              suminagashi. We use diluted Photo Flow now, as the current batch of
              Sumifactant (Colophon Book Arts) seems to be loosing
              strength...especially bottles purchased this year. All traditional
              suminagashi papers that I have seen or purchased over the years (coming
              from Japan) do not have bold colors. It is the very nature of the
              technique to allow suminagashi to happen rather than control what is
              happening....truly "go with the flow". Traditional colors are black,
              red and blue...when floated, becoming more gray, pink and blue. Some
              lovely old papers have veins of silver or or gold with the black.
              Colors are separated by the non color (diluted sumifactant or Photo
              Flow), forming crisp lines of various thickness. The thickness depends
              on the size brush and if it has a good pointed tip, plus the length of
              time the brush is held to the surface of the water (never below it) to
              form concentric rings, and the correct balance of the formulas of color
              vs non color. Too much pigment, too little surfactant, etc., all make a
              big difference in the final results.

              "Contemporary" suminagashi must be considered once you decide to alter
              your images and introduce bold colors.
              That is a personal choice, but certainly start with the basic technique
              until you are quite comfortable with it.
              Color harmony will depend on knowing how to properly mix colors rather
              than using those readily available (which can be limiting). Study line
              variance through brush control if this is the direction you wish to go.
              It is at this point that composition also must be considered as you are
              entering a new phase of the art rather than remaining with the simple
              beauty of traditional suminagashi...our oldest from of paper marbling-
              documented in 12th century Japan.

              I have worked with students who have excelled immediately and others
              could not grasp the concept at all. Some had previous instruction, then
              realized they were only taught the "mistakes" of others. Unfortunately,
              "Trial and Error" are the worst of instructors...but one does learn
              patience and endurance! -Milena


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