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Sprinkled paper/German, French?

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  • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
    Sorry, the last one wasn t meant to be sent yet, I hit the wrong key in haste. Second part of the posting: There are several techniques (with ot without
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 31 7:25 AM
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      Sorry, the last one wasn't meant to be sent yet, I hit the wrong key in haste.

      Second part of the posting:

      There are several techniques (with ot without chemical additives) and about as many
      names as there were makers. The overall term you cannot go wrong with is 'Sprinkled
      Paper', or in German: Sprenkelpapier. They were all made on the workbench, in rare cases
      by hand but in the vast majority of cases in an industrial or semi-industrial process. Base
      papers were always white or off-white, the colour beneath the sprinkles was laid as part of
      the patterning if there was an underlying colour. The sprinkles were added as wet-in-wet
      technique in any case, that is also in those cases when they are sitting on the white paper.

      Colour schemes varied, between black on bright or even garish base colours and biggish
      black sprinkled on smaller and fewer sprinkles of a second colour on white. There were
      also variations meant to resemble carrara marble and other stones. Almost anything you
      can imagine.

      They were very much used in late 19th and until mid 20th century and are still
      manufactured in a very cheap way, shiny as a mirror and on highly acidic base paper.

      Surfaces were predominantly very shiny, almost impossible to copy nowadays in
      reasonable time for a reasonable price with conservation grade materials and still give the
      binder a paper that can be worked with. I make them with a brushing of MC1000 and leave
      the rest to the binder to make after the binding is finished. It is no joy to work with paper
      with a coating that's needed for such a shiny effect.

      I'm ready to answer more questions if needed as soon as I have sorted the papery
      mountain on my desk (it is unbelievable what 10 days can do to a clean desk!)

      Susanne Krause
    • d_m_blair
      Thank you, all this information has been very helpful! Can I ask if anyone knows anything specific about the pattern, if one company was producing it? And
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 31 8:27 AM
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        Thank you, all this information has been very helpful!

        Can I ask if anyone knows anything specific about the pattern, if one company was
        producing it? And isn't sprinkled paper a form of marbling? What is the main difference?

        Thanks so much for the information already passed along, its been of much help!

        Best regards,

        Devin BLAIR






        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "hamburgerbuntpapier_de" <studio@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sorry, the last one wasn't meant to be sent yet, I hit the wrong key in haste.
        >
        > Second part of the posting:
        >
        > There are several techniques (with ot without chemical additives) and about as many
        > names as there were makers. The overall term you cannot go wrong with is 'Sprinkled
        > Paper', or in German: Sprenkelpapier. They were all made on the workbench, in rare
        cases
        > by hand but in the vast majority of cases in an industrial or semi-industrial process.
        Base
        > papers were always white or off-white, the colour beneath the sprinkles was laid as part
        of
        > the patterning if there was an underlying colour. The sprinkles were added as wet-in-
        wet
        > technique in any case, that is also in those cases when they are sitting on the white
        paper.
        >
        > Colour schemes varied, between black on bright or even garish base colours and biggish
        > black sprinkled on smaller and fewer sprinkles of a second colour on white. There were
        > also variations meant to resemble carrara marble and other stones. Almost anything you
        > can imagine.
        >
        > They were very much used in late 19th and until mid 20th century and are still
        > manufactured in a very cheap way, shiny as a mirror and on highly acidic base paper.
        >
        > Surfaces were predominantly very shiny, almost impossible to copy nowadays in
        > reasonable time for a reasonable price with conservation grade materials and still give
        the
        > binder a paper that can be worked with. I make them with a brushing of MC1000 and
        leave
        > the rest to the binder to make after the binding is finished. It is no joy to work with
        paper
        > with a coating that's needed for such a shiny effect.
        >
        > I'm ready to answer more questions if needed as soon as I have sorted the papery
        > mountain on my desk (it is unbelievable what 10 days can do to a clean desk!)
        >
        > Susanne Krause
        >
      • Søren Ibsen
        I remember that paper used in bookbinding some 30 years ago. In Denmark we call it Gustav marmor . it was thin paper and shiny. We always used thin hot
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 31 9:47 AM
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          I remember that paper used in bookbinding some 30 years ago. In Denmark we
          call it "Gustav marmor". it was thin paper and shiny. We always used thin
          hot animal glue to fasten it to boards.
          It is of German origin.

          Kind regards

          Søren Ibsen



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nick Metal Kandy
          Getting real glue in the US I think is problematic Soren. I can t say offhand I know of a source. ~ Nick ... From: Søren Ibsen To:
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 31 10:24 AM
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            Getting real glue in the US I think is problematic Soren. I can't say
            offhand I know of a source.

            ~ Nick




            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Søren Ibsen <soren.ibsen@...>
            To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 12:47:19 PM
            Subject: Re: [Marbling] Re: Sprinkled paper/German, French?



            I remember that paper used in bookbinding some 30 years ago. In Denmark we
            call it "Gustav marmor". it was thin paper and shiny. We always used thin
            hot animal glue to fasten it to boards.
          • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
            Hej Søren, det er ikke Gustavmarmor, Gustavmarmor er den med spætternes rænder i kontrastfarver– or in English: that s not Gustavmarmor, Gustavmarmor is
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 1, 2007
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              Hej Søren,

              det er ikke Gustavmarmor, Gustavmarmor er den med spætternes rænder i kontrastfarver–
              or in English: that's not Gustavmarmor, Gustavmarmor is the kind where the sprinkles have
              edges in constrasting colour. The English term for Gustavmarmor is cocoa marbled paper.
              It is not marbled, though, it is made on the workbench like all sprinkled papers.

              The German term used most frequently for the kind of sprinkled paper we are currently
              talking about is 'Achatmarmor', but I do not know the Danish or even English equivalent.
              Can look it up one of these days.

              Nick:
              For real animal glue, go look at the place where restorers buy their materials. They are lost
              without glue. But take care! There are two kinds of animal glue, made either from bones or
              else from skin. The bones kind hardens much harder and is used predominantly by
              furniture restorers, the skin kind (especially the one made from hare's skin and feet, and
              especially if prepared freshly) is finer and not as hard as stones and that's the kind good
              bookbinders have used in books for centuries. Restorers roll their eyes when they have to
              cope with bone glue in a book, it's always additional work and guaranteed to involve more
              loss than skin glue.

              Susanne Krause
            • Søren Ibsen
              Hej Susanne, Du har helt ret! Det er ikke Gustavmarmor, men agatmarmor? Thanks, you are right. It is not Gustavmarmor, but Agatmarmor ? It is also a thin
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 1, 2007
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                Hej Susanne,

                Du har helt ret! Det er ikke Gustavmarmor, men agatmarmor?

                Thanks, you are right. It is not Gustavmarmor, but "Agatmarmor"? It is
                also a thin and shiny paper, and treated in the same way as "Gustavmarmor".

                The animal glue we used was in plasticpackages to keep the glue soft and
                avoid the glue to harden. Use it fresh in waterbath or gluepot. The
                temperature must not goes over 60 degree Celsius.

                Kind regards

                Søren Ibsen

                --On 1. august 2007 07:36 +0000 hamburgerbuntpapier_de
                <studio@...> wrote:

                > Hej Søren,
                >
                > det er ikke Gustavmarmor, Gustavmarmor er den med spætternes rænder i
                kontrastfarver?
                > or in English: that's not Gustavmarmor, Gustavmarmor is the kind where
                the sprinkles have
                > edges in constrasting colour. The English term for Gustavmarmor is cocoa
                marbled paper.
                > It is not marbled, though, it is made on the workbench like all sprinkled
                papers.
                >
                > The German term used most frequently for the kind of sprinkled paper we
                are currently
                > talking about is 'Achatmarmor', but I do not know the Danish or even
                English equivalent.
                > Can look it up one of these days.
                >
                > Nick:
                > For real animal glue, go look at the place where restorers buy their
                materials. They are lost
                > without glue. But take care! There are two kinds of animal glue, made
                either from bones or
                > else from skin. The bones kind hardens much harder and is used
                predominantly by
                > furniture restorers, the skin kind (especially the one made from hare's
                skin and feet, and
                > especially if prepared freshly) is finer and not as hard as stones and
                that's the kind good
                > bookbinders have used in books for centuries. Restorers roll their eyes
                when they have to
                > cope with bone glue in a book, it's always additional work and guaranteed
                to involve more
                > loss than skin glue.
                >
                > Susanne Krause
                >
                >




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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