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Deaf marbling artists in Hyderabad

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  • Jake Benson
    http://www.virtualo.com/ Deaf artists revive 17th Century art form VirtualO is a for-profit organization that fosters and promotes differently-abled
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 17, 2007
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      http://www.virtualo.com/


      Deaf artists revive 17th Century art form

      VirtualO is a "for-profit" organization that fosters and promotes "differently-abled" artists.
      Based in Hyderabad, India, it was founded in 2001 by a young business school professor,
      Baba Prasad (Ph.D., The Wharton School) and S. Chandramouli (Mouli), an internationally-
      ranked Deaf badminton player. Dr. Prasad, who lives in the USA invested his personal
      funds to start and run the organization, and now manages the marketing and fundraising.
      Mouli manages the operations of the organization full-time in Hyderabad, India.

      VirtualO artists use marbling to express their Deaf perceptions

      17th century Deccani artists in south India created marble effects in paintings. The Deaf
      artists at VirtualO, especially Khaled Mohammed, have become famous for their brilliant
      revival of this lost art form of marbling (Marbling techniques were also used 2000 years
      ago by Japanese artists who called it Suminagashi). While these ancient traditions used
      vegetable dyes, VirtualO artists use oils and acrylics which are more difficult to control.

      The ebbs and flows of the paints and the patterns that they are given through long
      meditation and close control by the artist make the marbling technique very appropriate
      for Deaf expression. As you will notice, in all these paintings, forms and colors flow into
      each other in unique ways that reflect the texture of the non-hearing worlds of our
      artists. Visual patterns become substitutes for sound patterns. Familial scenes (mother and
      child, conversations, family scenes), natural landscapes, and rural life portraits display
      relationships and sense of belonging. In a sense, these paintings become bridges between
      hearing and non-hearing worlds for our Deaf artists.
    • irisnevins
      Jake...this is great. I will report this to GBW next time and maybe it will help them out a bit. Do you remember a number of years back Alexandra Soteriou had
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 18, 2007
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        Jake...this is great. I will report this to GBW next time and maybe it will help them out a bit.

        Do you remember a number of years back Alexandra Soteriou had come across a village made up of orphans who supported themselves by marbling? If you remember the details it would be appreciated. I can ask her too, not sure if she is on the list.

        Iris Nevins
        www.marblingpaper.com
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jake Benson<mailto:jemiljan@...>
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, June 18, 2007 2:08 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] Deaf marbling artists in Hyderabad


        http://www.virtualo.com/<http://www.virtualo.com/>


        Deaf artists revive 17th Century art form

        VirtualO is a "for-profit" organization that fosters and promotes "differently-abled" artists.
        Based in Hyderabad, India, it was founded in 2001 by a young business school professor,
        Baba Prasad (Ph.D., The Wharton School) and S. Chandramouli (Mouli), an internationally-
        ranked Deaf badminton player. Dr. Prasad, who lives in the USA invested his personal
        funds to start and run the organization, and now manages the marketing and fundraising.
        Mouli manages the operations of the organization full-time in Hyderabad, India.

        VirtualO artists use marbling to express their Deaf perceptions

        17th century Deccani artists in south India created marble effects in paintings. The Deaf
        artists at VirtualO, especially Khaled Mohammed, have become famous for their brilliant
        revival of this lost art form of marbling (Marbling techniques were also used 2000 years
        ago by Japanese artists who called it Suminagashi). While these ancient traditions used
        vegetable dyes, VirtualO artists use oils and acrylics which are more difficult to control.

        The ebbs and flows of the paints and the patterns that they are given through long
        meditation and close control by the artist make the marbling technique very appropriate
        for Deaf expression. As you will notice, in all these paintings, forms and colors flow into
        each other in unique ways that reflect the texture of the non-hearing worlds of our
        artists. Visual patterns become substitutes for sound patterns. Familial scenes (mother and
        child, conversations, family scenes), natural landscapes, and rural life portraits display
        relationships and sense of belonging. In a sense, these paintings become bridges between
        hearing and non-hearing worlds for our Deaf artists.






        Yahoo! Groups Links





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jake Benson
        Hi Iris, I remember you mentioning this to me, but don t think I ve ever discussed this with Alex. If you find out anything more, do let us know.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 18, 2007
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          Hi Iris,

          I remember you mentioning this to me, but don't think I've ever
          discussed this with Alex. If you find out anything more, do let us
          know.

          Incidentally, I've found another marbling artist by the name of
          Shivkumar Pundkar. He claims to have developed an original method of
          blowing on a brush loaded with color, according to this blog on
          Contemporary Indian art:

          <http://thisishowitshouldbe.blogspot.com/2005_12_01_archive.html>

          "Shivkumar Pundkar, a doctor from Dhule, M.P., claims to have invented
          a new technique, since his method is one of blowing into the brush
          loaded with water colour pigments. His exhibition of "doc art water
          surface painting" (KCP, Nov 24 to 30) indeed evoked plenty of watery
          sensations, which happened nevertheless quite on the 'surface' level.
          The smallish abstractions rely on intended and chance effects created
          by colours bleeding and marbling or forming vein-like patterns."

          You can see some of Mr. Pundkar's work here on Yessy:

          http://www.yessy.com/docart_shiv/gallery.html

          Jake

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@...> wrote:
          >
          > Jake...this is great. I will report this to GBW next time and maybe
          it will help them out a bit.
          >
          > Do you remember a number of years back Alexandra Soteriou had come
          across a village made up of orphans who supported themselves by
          marbling? If you remember the details it would be appreciated. I can
          ask her too, not sure if she is on the list.
          >
          > Iris Nevins
          > www.marblingpaper.com
          >
          >
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