Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Marbled Antiquaria at Auction

Expand Messages
  • Jake Benson
    An interesting falcon made of cut paper, featuring a piece of kumlu or sandy patterned paper is coming up for auction at Sotheby s in London, SALE L07220 :
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 14, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      An interesting falcon made of cut paper, featuring a piece of kumlu or
      "sandy' patterned paper is coming up for auction at Sotheby's in
      London, SALE L07220 : Islamic Works of Art. Lot 27. 18 Apr 07 10:30 AM.

      FALCON IN DECOUPAGE, OTTOMAN, TURKEY, 16TH OR 17TH CENTURY

      3,000—4,000 GBP

      <http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/lot/LotDetail.jsp?lot_id=159337367>

      Direct links to enlarged images:

      http://s7d2.scene7.com/is/image/Sothebys/L07220-27-lr-1?$smaller_file$
      http://s7d2.scene7.com/is/image/Sothebys/L07220-27-lr-1?$orig_file$

      (Note, I have placed this image in the group photo album labeled
      "Marbled Antiquaria at Auction")

      MEASUREMENTS
      5 by 10cm.

      DESCRIPTION

      Watercolour heightened with gold, finely cut paper laid down on stout
      paper, the falcon standing on a perch, his body and head of marbled
      paper, borders in colours and gold.


      CATALOGUE NOTE

      The skillful and delicate technique of decoupage was perfected in the
      sixteenth century in Ottoman Turkey. One of the most celebrated of
      these artists was the master Efsançi Mehmed (d.1534), who created an
      entire garden of paper cut outs measuring twenty centimetres in length
      and whose fame was such that the grand vizier himself visited the
      artist at his home. Whilst Mehmed's works focus on naturalistic floral
      arrangements others, such as the seventeenth century calligrapher
      Mehmed bin Ahmed Sirozi, also worked with architectural features (see
      Atasoy 2002, p.73-89). The present example exhibits the fine cut-out
      work of the Ottoman period, the sinuous grape vines, irises, and
      feathery saz leaves are typical of sixteenth and seventeenth century
      Turkish work.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.