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Re: [Marbling] Suminagashi on Loew-Cornell rice paper

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  • DaveorRobin Olson
    Dawn, Working with rice paper and strathmore are very different. I have been in your shoes. All you need is more practice. There is a definite feel one has
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2007
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      Dawn,
      Working with rice paper and strathmore are very
      different. I have been in your shoes. All you need is
      more practice. There is a definite "feel" one has to
      develop to get the rice paper on the water without
      hesitaiton marks and bubbles. It was interesting
      reading your post today. This past weekend I did some
      suminagashi after not having done any for a couple of
      years. I had the exact same problem .I remember
      thinking how out of practice I was. In the past I used
      to do suminagashi on fabric more than on paper.I find
      it easier to do on fabric than on paper.Either way
      hang in there it is a wonderful beautiful artform.
      Robin olson

      --- peninkwords <peninkwords@...> wrote:

      > I'm a new suminagashi marbler and have been
      > experimenting to see
      > what works for me. I'm making suminagashi paper for
      > handmade
      > books. I graduated myself from practicing on
      > inexpensive Strathmore
      > drawing paper to rice paper (Loew-Cornell). I am
      > frustrated with
      > the rice paper. No matter what method I try, I
      > always get white
      > marks, air bubbles, and hesitation marks with the
      > rice paper. I'm
      > using 12 inches by 14 inches. Is it because the
      > paper is too
      > lightweight or is my piece too big? Is it the paper
      > or just me? It
      > doesn't grab equally as did the 10 X 12 inch drawing
      > paper. I
      > didn't have these defects when using the drawing
      > paper. Does anyone
      > have past beginner experience with this?
      >
      > I've been having a lot of fun with fractured designs
      > (discovered by
      > accident by using Higgins orange ink). When I want
      > more brilliant
      > colors with my other Higgins inks (fadeproof are the
      > only ones that
      > seem to work), I've been adding a tablespoon of
      > white vingear to the
      > water. The bonus is that it helps stop a lot of the
      > washing off of
      > the color).
      >
      > ~Dawn
      >
      >


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    • peninkwords
      Thanks for the replies - makes me feel connected to other people w/ the same obsessions. I was adding a tablespoon of vinegar to my water before applying the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 10, 2007
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        Thanks for the replies - makes me feel connected to other people w/
        the same obsessions.

        I was adding a tablespoon of vinegar to my water before applying the
        Higgins inks to get a better color. I am now thinking this might not
        be a good idea.
        Does the vinegar make the paper now have an acid in it?
        And is this amount of vinegar enough to destroy the paper eventually?
        I'm afraid the answer will be yes.
        There may be a new ink collection in my future...

        thanks,
        Dawn
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