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Re: Alternative sizes

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  • luannesews2001
    I m using blender size now and I like it (except for the cost of carrageenan, of course) and I d discovered that you can use the size as soon as the bubbles
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 27, 2006
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      I'm using "blender size" now and I like it (except for the cost of
      carrageenan, of course) and I'd discovered that you can use the size as
      soon as the bubbles settle if you start with room temperature water.
      Have you ever tried sodium alginate with acrylics or water colors?
      It's certainly nice slimy stuff.

      Lu

      >
      > Hi Lucinda,
      >
      > Many years ago (like about 25) I used sodium alginate...but that was
      when I was marbling with oil paints rather than acrylics, and that was
      what worked best for oil paints. Since I switched to acrylics I've
      only used carrageenan. There are two types of carrageenan...the dried
      seaweed type that you have to boil and strain, and then the "blender"
      type which is in granular form. Peggy Skycraft passed on the best
      advice that you do not have to make your blender carrageenan the night
      before, but can mix it as needed. An emersion blender works
      best...just mix and wait a few minutes for the bubbles to settle
      and "you're good to go."
      >
      > d. guffey
    • irisnevins
      I know that s true about making up the size right before.... But keep in mind it is best to get a large blender, that holds two quarts (Walmart is where mine
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 27, 2006
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        I know that's true about making up the size right before.... But keep in mind it is best to get a large blender, that holds two quarts (Walmart is where mine is from) and I would suggest one TBS (rounded if in hard water area, needs a bit more to gel) blended in two quarts hot tap water ( I know many won't use it, but I have always made tap water work with great results no matter where... only exception is if it has a water softener on it, then use bottled water) until all lumps are gone. Just don't add the extra quart as you would if blending with a quart of water. I do find doing it hot works better.... and I still would wait an hour after pouring it into the tray, to bring to room temperature.

        I used to marble this way, but find, it's just a little better if it sits overnight. Just my personal experience for the places I have marbled. But sure, if I have to marble all of a sudden, I do make the size an hour ahead and just get to it. Blending with hot water and the larger amount of water, it makes the size pretty near perfect. I do like the luxury of rolling out of bed and having the size ready to go in the morning though. Dolores is right though about this!

        Iris Nevins
        www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Guffey<mailto:dguff@...>
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2006 10:59 AM
        Subject: Re: [Marbling] Alternative sizes


        Hi Lucinda,

        Many years ago (like about 25) I used sodium alginate...but that was when I was marbling with oil paints rather than acrylics, and that was what worked best for oil paints. Since I switched to acrylics I've only used carrageenan. There are two types of carrageenan...the dried seaweed type that you have to boil and strain, and then the "blender" type which is in granular form. Peggy Skycraft passed on the best advice that you do not have to make your blender carrageenan the night before, but can mix it as needed. An emersion blender works best...just mix and wait a few minutes for the bubbles to settle and "you're good to go."

        d. guffey



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Luiseach@...<mailto:Luiseach@...>
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2006 7:10 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] Alternative sizes


        Has anyone in the group tried marbling on other sizes--not methyl cellulose
        or carrageenan? One of Diane Maurer's books has instructions for a psyllium
        seed size as well as a gelatin based size and I know that marblers in Turkey
        and that region traditionally used a gum size. I'm in a mood to experiment,
        but if anyone has experience to offer, I'd love to hear about it.

        Lucinda in rainy southern California

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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      • luannesews2001
        I have an immersion blender for doing smaller batches and a boat motor mixer blades on a long shaft that fits my big drill for doing larger batches. Both of
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 27, 2006
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          I have an immersion blender for doing smaller batches and a "boat
          motor" mixer blades on a long shaft that fits my big drill for doing
          larger batches. Both of them work well, but the immersion blender
          takes longer and seems to leave more bubbles in the size.

          Lucinda

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@...> wrote:
          >
          > I know that's true about making up the size right before.... But
          keep in mind it is best to get a large blender, that holds two quarts
          (Walmart is where mine is from) and I would suggest one TBS (rounded
          if in hard water area, needs a bit more to gel) blended in two quarts
          hot tap water ( I know many won't use it, but I have always made tap
          water work with great results no matter where... only exception is if
          it has a water softener on it, then use bottled water) until all
          lumps are gone. Just don't add the extra quart as you would if
          blending with a quart of water. I do find doing it hot works
          better.... and I still would wait an hour after pouring it into the
          tray, to bring to room temperature.
          >
          > I used to marble this way, but find, it's just a little better if
          it sits overnight. Just my personal experience for the places I have
          marbled. But sure, if I have to marble all of a sudden, I do make the
          size an hour ahead and just get to it. Blending with hot water and
          the larger amount of water, it makes the size pretty near perfect. I
          do like the luxury of rolling out of bed and having the size ready to
          go in the morning though. Dolores is right though about this!
          >
          > Iris Nevins
          > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>
          > ----- Original Message -----
        • irisnevins
          I never had luck with the immersion blenders either. I like my big Walmart one, I think it s a Sunbeam or something, not near it right now. many makers have
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 27, 2006
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            I never had luck with the immersion blenders either. I like my big Walmart one, I think it's a Sunbeam or something, not near it right now. many makers have bigger models. Even if yours takes 6 cups it helps, then add 2 cups water after.

            Iris Nevins
            www.marblingpaper.com
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: luannesews2001<mailto:Luiseach@...>
            To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2006 5:14 PM
            Subject: [Marbling] Mixing methods, was Alternative sizes


            I have an immersion blender for doing smaller batches and a "boat
            motor" mixer blades on a long shaft that fits my big drill for doing
            larger batches. Both of them work well, but the immersion blender
            takes longer and seems to leave more bubbles in the size.

            Lucinda

            --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@...> wrote:
            >
            > I know that's true about making up the size right before.... But
            keep in mind it is best to get a large blender, that holds two quarts
            (Walmart is where mine is from) and I would suggest one TBS (rounded
            if in hard water area, needs a bit more to gel) blended in two quarts
            hot tap water ( I know many won't use it, but I have always made tap
            water work with great results no matter where... only exception is if
            it has a water softener on it, then use bottled water) until all
            lumps are gone. Just don't add the extra quart as you would if
            blending with a quart of water. I do find doing it hot works
            better.... and I still would wait an hour after pouring it into the
            tray, to bring to room temperature.
            >
            > I used to marble this way, but find, it's just a little better if
            it sits overnight. Just my personal experience for the places I have
            marbled. But sure, if I have to marble all of a sudden, I do make the
            size an hour ahead and just get to it. Blending with hot water and
            the larger amount of water, it makes the size pretty near perfect. I
            do like the luxury of rolling out of bed and having the size ready to
            go in the morning though. Dolores is right though about this!
            >
            > Iris Nevins
            > www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/<http://www.marblingpaper.com<http://www.marblingpaper.com/>>
            > ----- Original Message -----





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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Angela Drake
            When I first learned how to marble in Germany, I used boxed wallpaper paste. It came in powdered form and I added warm water. It performed very closely to
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 28, 2006
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              When I first learned how to marble in Germany, I used boxed wallpaper paste.
              It came in powdered form and I added warm water. It performed very closely
              to carrageenan - the control wasn't as fine but good for teaching beginners
              and children or for practicing new technique. I can't find the same product
              in the US but perhaps things have changed in the past ten years. I wish I
              knew what the ingredients were but I'm afraid I can't remember! Maybe
              someone living in Germany would know?

              Angie
            • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
              It depends on when you learned with wallpaper paste. Wallpaper paste of old was (methyl-)cellulose. Since the 1970ies, more and more additives have
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 28, 2006
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                It depends on when you learned with wallpaper paste. Wallpaper paste of old was
                (methyl-)cellulose. Since the 1970ies, more and more additives have 'contaminated' it,
                meaning polyvenyl, fungicides, softeners and other undesirable stuff. Now it is next to
                impossible to find mc-wallpaper paste. Using pure mc would be the safe alternative.

                Apart from that no one can say for sure what the additives do to the paper in the long run,
                none of them is what I'd like on my hands, let alone on the hands of children.

                Susanne Krause


                --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, Angela Drake <angiedrake@...> wrote:
                >
                > When I first learned how to marble in Germany, I used boxed wallpaper paste.
                > It came in powdered form and I added warm water. It performed very closely
                > to carrageenan - the control wasn't as fine but good for teaching beginners
                > and children or for practicing new technique. I can't find the same product
                > in the US but perhaps things have changed in the past ten years. I wish I
                > knew what the ingredients were but I'm afraid I can't remember! Maybe
                > someone living in Germany would know?
                >
                > Angie
                >
              • Maria Vernersson
                Hi all What is an emersion blender??? maria
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 29, 2006
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                  Hi all

                  What is an emersion blender???

                  maria
                • Lavinia Adler
                  I almost asked this myself, Maria, but decided to google it. Turns out it s a hand held, wand-like implement with fairly small blades. They range greatly in
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 29, 2006
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                    I almost asked this myself, Maria, but decided to google it. Turns out
                    it's a hand held, wand-like implement with fairly small blades. They
                    range greatly in price, 'though I imagine for purposes of blending size
                    you wouldn't need anything fancy. I'm hitting the stores today to see
                    some "in person".

                    Lavinia

                    On Fri, 29 Dec 2006 11:00:20 +0100 "Maria Vernersson"
                    <maria.vernersson@...> writes:

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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