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Preparing paints

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  • Jake Benson
    About preparing paints: Read Halfer s Progress of the Marbling Art. Iris just said a lot in her posting too. Hikmet s new An Infinity of Colors book has much
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 10, 2000
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      About preparing paints:

      Read Halfer's Progress of the Marbling Art.

      Iris just said a lot in her posting too.

      Hikmet's new "An Infinity of Colors" book has much info for traditional Ebru

      Ingrid Weimann just forwarded me this new site by Alparslan Baboglu

      http://www.geleneksel-ebru.com/ENGLISH/english_fr_page.htm

      there is much info there too.

      He is one of the pupils of the late master Mustafa Düzgünman




      Benson's Hand Bindery
      Fine Bookbinding, Conservation, and Hand Marbled Papers
      1319 B Summerville Ave.
      Columbia S.C. 29201
      803.799.1853
      jemiljan@...

      ----------
      >From: Marbling@egroups.com
      >To: Marbling@egroups.com
      >Subject: [Marbling] Digest Number 105
      >Date: Tue, Oct 10, 2000, 7:52 AM
      >

      >
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      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      > There are 4 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Suminagashi on Fabric and Acrylic Resins/Polymers- Paint manufacture
      > From: "Jake Benson" <jemiljan@...>
      > 2. Suminagashi on Fabric and Acrylic Resins/Polymers- Paint manufacture
      > From: irisnevins <irisnevins@...>
      > 3. Alcohol in paints &c.
      > From: irisnevins <irisnevins@...>
      > 4. Re: Alcohol in paints &c.
      > From: "John Ang" <johnacs@...>
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2000 11:32:49 -0400
      > From: "Jake Benson" <jemiljan@...>
      > Subject: Suminagashi on Fabric and Acrylic Resins/Polymers- Paint manufacture
      >
      > Marie's psoting reminds me, that there is a wonderful historical text called
      > the Suminagashi-zome of Tokutaru Yagi (sp?), translated and published by
      > Robin Heyeck. In this book, he describes a method he developped for doing
      > suminagashi on silk, which was then used for Obi sashes in Kimonos. The
      > process is rather elaborate, and it involved using block resist methods,
      > then reversing them to do each section of fabric. I don't know how he set
      > the paints.
      >
      > Charles Woolnough did watercolor marbling on bookcloth. Iris Nevins can tell
      > you more about this, as she has a copy of Woolnough. I have seen a sample
      > at Houghton Library, and I wondered about the durability. There seemed to
      > be no coating on it. I do have one German volume in my collection that has
      > a Spanish pattern excuted on a leather grain embossed paper (pretty strange
      > actually!), and that too has suffered from abrasion.
      >
      > I should clarify one thing, and that is there is a difference between
      > acrylic resin and acrylic polymer emulsions. Acrylic resins are just that,
      > hard inflexible resins. They are manufactured in a wide variety of grades of
      > hardness, solvent solubilty and resulting flexibilty. Some are Acryloid
      > B67, used by objects conservators for stone etc. and Acryloid B72, used by
      > paintings and sometimes paper conservators for consolidation and inpainting
      > reapirs. It's basically the main ingredient in products like Krylon Crystal
      > Clear. The Library of Congress Research and Testing office tested Krylon
      > some years ago, and found this out. It is considered to be pretty stable and
      > non-acidic. The solvents in it are another matter however, and proper
      > precautions should be observed when using such products.
      >
      > (On another note, I recently tried the new "low odor" Krylon, which uses an
      > acrylic latex fixative in isopropanol. I wasn't very happy with the
      > results. It tended to bead up and not coat as evenly. Latex is generally
      > considered to be unstable by conservators as well, as the oils in it break
      > down and cause all sorts of problems over time.)
      >
      > Acrylic fabric paints and such are resins that have been polymerized. That
      > means they have longer molecule chain structures that give it greater
      > flexibility, and are dispersed in water. This is known as an Arcrylic
      > Polymer Emulsion.
      >
      > For further reading, I highly recomend referring to 2 newer volumes onthe
      > subject. Many poeple are familiar with ralph Mayer's The Artist's Handbook.
      > I find that while much of the information is useful, it is also very dated,
      > and hasn't been revised since Mr. Mayer's Death some time ago. So skip that
      > one....
      >
      > I prefer The painter's Handbook by Mark David Gottsegen, Watson-Guptill, New
      > York, 1993 ISBN 0-8230-3003-2. This book has a tremendous ammount of
      > information and much is presented in chart reference format. Unfortunatley,
      > there are no photos. Another book that I like alot since it has great
      > photographs, is The Artist's Handbook by Ray Smith. Knopf, New York 1992.
      > ISBN 0-394-55585-6. While these aren't exactly written with mabrling in
      > mind at all, they are great resources from which you can thoroughly
      > familiarize yourself with a variety of media, processes, and terminology.
      > It's very inspiring for doing multi media work.
      >
      > Hope this helps,
      >
      > Jake Benson
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2000 16:47:09 -0400
      > From: irisnevins <irisnevins@...>
      > Subject: Suminagashi on Fabric and Acrylic Resins/Polymers- Paint manufacture
      >
      > Just catching up....have been on a long overdue vacation....
      >
      > My copy of Woolnough's is not a marbled cloth one, and in fact was a very
      > beat up copy I rebound with my own papers (I hope old Charlie didn't mind
      > too much!). But it does mention that he did a public demonstration of
      > bookcloth marbling if I am remembering correctly. I do not know whether it
      > had a coating, but in his day they did size then polish papers by machine
      > to make them shiny and to protect them, so presume that may have been the
      > after treatment of the cloth if they had one.
      >
      > Iris Nevins
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2000 17:02:48 -0400
      > From: irisnevins <irisnevins@...>
      > Subject: Alcohol in paints &c.
      >
      > Yes Jake, I do sell fabric/paper marbling acrylics. Check the web at:
      >
      > www.marblingpaper.50megs.com for the complete listings
      >
      > My acrylics seem very pricey, but they go a long way, in fact for use on
      > paper I need to dilute them with at least an equal amount of water or they
      > are too intense. As an extra surprise I have found when I work on paper
      > with them (though I generally don't because the more traditional look is my
      > thing) in this way, and do not use "excess" paint, I do not need to alum or
      > rinse on almost every type of paper I have tried. I do not guarantee this,
      > as a marbler can squirt on too much and it can run.
      >
      > The reason my acrylics seem so pricey is because store bought acrylics are
      > essentially a colored acrylic base. Mine are very high in very high grade,
      > therefore expensive, pigments, and I use as little acrylic base as
      > possible. This was keeping fabric marbling in mind because too much acrylic
      > base can stiffen fabrics. Also, being proportionally way higher in pigment,
      > small drops are all that is necessary. I only use Phot-flo to adjust them,
      > if necessary. Usually I only need to figure out whorder to lay them down
      > in.
      >
      > I started making both types of paints over 15 years ago because I do a lot
      > of productio work where I have to match hundereds of the same papers and
      > could not tolerate the inconsistensies of the gouache manufacturers.
      > Otherwise I would not even be able to copy my own work.....embarrassing for
      > a marbler! I continue to always fine tune the paints, and believe this will
      > be a lifelong experiment, and it has also been a very costly one, but worth
      > it to me. I have literally "poured" tens of thousands of dollars into my
      > marbling trough trying to figure all this out thus far. To make it all more
      > difficult...there is no one "formula".....each pigment has its own chemical
      > and physical properties which alter the need for certain ingredients.
      >
      > Even having a consistent paint (and the acrylics are always more volitile
      > and unpredictable than the watercolors) is only part of the battle......so
      > many variables such as humidity, temperature....and I believe it was Diane
      > Maurer who once had me in hysterics because she even said the marblers good
      > or bad mood on that day could completely ruin things! So true.
      >
      > IrisN.
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 4
      > Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2000 02:16:11 -0000
      > From: "John Ang" <johnacs@...>
      > Subject: Re: Alcohol in paints &c.
      >
      > Dear Iris,
      >
      > Is it be possible to let us know how one goes about preparing
      > marbling paints. For example the proportion of pigment to other
      > components of the marbling color, etc.
      >
      > Many thanks
      >
      > Regards
      >
      >> I started making both types of paints over 15 years ago because I
      > do a lot
      >> of productio work where I have to match hundereds of the same
      > papers and
      >> could not tolerate the inconsistensies of the gouache manufacturers.
      >> Otherwise I would not even be able to copy my own
      > work.....embarrassing for
      >> a marbler! I continue to always fine tune the paints, and believe
      > this will
      >> be a lifelong experiment, and it has also been a very costly one,
      > but worth
      >> it to me. I have literally "poured" tens of thousands of dollars
      > into my
      >> marbling trough trying to figure all this out thus far. To make it
      > all more
      >> difficult...there is no one "formula".....each pigment has its own
      > chemical
      >> and physical properties which alter the need for certain
      > ingredients.
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      >
    • John Ang Cheng Siew
      To Jake Benson, Is it alright if the website below is listed in our list s link section? ... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ . .-P John Ang Cheng Siew My Paper Marbling Website:
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 12, 2000
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        To Jake Benson,

        Is it alright if the website below is listed in our list's link section?

        >Ingrid Weimann just forwarded me this new site by Alparslan Baboglu
        >
        >http://www.geleneksel-ebru.com/ENGLISH/english_fr_page.htm
        >
        >there is much info there too.
        >
        >He is one of the pupils of the late master Mustafa Düzgünman
        >

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        .
        .-P

        John Ang Cheng Siew
        My Paper Marbling Website: <home3.pacific.net.sg/~johnacs>
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