Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Suminagashi on Fabric and Acrylic Resins/Polymers- Paint manufacture

Expand Messages
  • Jake Benson
    Marie s psoting reminds me, that there is a wonderful historical text called the Suminagashi-zome of Tokutaru Yagi (sp?), translated and published by Robin
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 9, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Marie's psoting reminds me, that there is a wonderful historical text called
      the Suminagashi-zome of Tokutaru Yagi (sp?), translated and published by
      Robin Heyeck. In this book, he describes a method he developped for doing
      suminagashi on silk, which was then used for Obi sashes in Kimonos. The
      process is rather elaborate, and it involved using block resist methods,
      then reversing them to do each section of fabric. I don't know how he set
      the paints.

      Charles Woolnough did watercolor marbling on bookcloth. Iris Nevins can tell
      you more about this, as she has a copy of Woolnough. I have seen a sample
      at Houghton Library, and I wondered about the durability. There seemed to
      be no coating on it. I do have one German volume in my collection that has
      a Spanish pattern excuted on a leather grain embossed paper (pretty strange
      actually!), and that too has suffered from abrasion.

      I should clarify one thing, and that is there is a difference between
      acrylic resin and acrylic polymer emulsions. Acrylic resins are just that,
      hard inflexible resins. They are manufactured in a wide variety of grades of
      hardness, solvent solubilty and resulting flexibilty. Some are Acryloid
      B67, used by objects conservators for stone etc. and Acryloid B72, used by
      paintings and sometimes paper conservators for consolidation and inpainting
      reapirs. It's basically the main ingredient in products like Krylon Crystal
      Clear. The Library of Congress Research and Testing office tested Krylon
      some years ago, and found this out. It is considered to be pretty stable and
      non-acidic. The solvents in it are another matter however, and proper
      precautions should be observed when using such products.

      (On another note, I recently tried the new "low odor" Krylon, which uses an
      acrylic latex fixative in isopropanol. I wasn't very happy with the
      results. It tended to bead up and not coat as evenly. Latex is generally
      considered to be unstable by conservators as well, as the oils in it break
      down and cause all sorts of problems over time.)

      Acrylic fabric paints and such are resins that have been polymerized. That
      means they have longer molecule chain structures that give it greater
      flexibility, and are dispersed in water. This is known as an Arcrylic
      Polymer Emulsion.

      For further reading, I highly recomend referring to 2 newer volumes onthe
      subject. Many poeple are familiar with ralph Mayer's The Artist's Handbook.
      I find that while much of the information is useful, it is also very dated,
      and hasn't been revised since Mr. Mayer's Death some time ago. So skip that
      one....

      I prefer The painter's Handbook by Mark David Gottsegen, Watson-Guptill, New
      York, 1993 ISBN 0-8230-3003-2. This book has a tremendous ammount of
      information and much is presented in chart reference format. Unfortunatley,
      there are no photos. Another book that I like alot since it has great
      photographs, is The Artist's Handbook by Ray Smith. Knopf, New York 1992.
      ISBN 0-394-55585-6. While these aren't exactly written with mabrling in
      mind at all, they are great resources from which you can thoroughly
      familiarize yourself with a variety of media, processes, and terminology.
      It's very inspiring for doing multi media work.

      Hope this helps,

      Jake Benson
    • irisnevins
      Just catching up....have been on a long overdue vacation.... My copy of Woolnough s is not a marbled cloth one, and in fact was a very beat up copy I rebound
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 9, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        Just catching up....have been on a long overdue vacation....

        My copy of Woolnough's is not a marbled cloth one, and in fact was a very
        beat up copy I rebound with my own papers (I hope old Charlie didn't mind
        too much!). But it does mention that he did a public demonstration of
        bookcloth marbling if I am remembering correctly. I do not know whether it
        had a coating, but in his day they did size then polish papers by machine
        to make them shiny and to protect them, so presume that may have been the
        after treatment of the cloth if they had one.

        Iris Nevins
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.