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paints

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  • Marie Palowoda
    jan, in my frustration with the paint companies endless changing of their formulas i have begun a study of paint making. from what i have learned so far, your
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 8, 2000
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      jan,
      in my frustration with the paint companies endless changing of their formulas i have begun a study of paint making. from what i have learned so far, your assumption that alcohol is a wetting agent , differing from the surfactant roll of the ox gall is correct.
      in response to your question about the difference between acrylic and watercolor paints. acrylic paints are those paints in which the vehicle is an acrylic resin.  watercolor and goauche (opaque watercolor)  are paints of which the liquid is a water dispersion of the binding material, usually gum arabic.
      in addition to the chemical and molecular differences in paint formulas marbling surfactants, etc., inconsistent information in books can also stem from the fact that the marbling process is vitally affected by the environment, ie. temperature, humidity.  what works for one marbler/author may not work for another marbler.  the information given in books or by other means is not to be taken as method set in stone but as a starting place with which to experiment and fine tune to achieve one's own working method. 
      as to your fabric paint questions i don't know if there is a significant difference beween acrylic marbling paints and acrylic fabric marbling paints in general.  i have seen differing methods of 'setting' acrylic paints on fabric by various paint manufacturer's which would be a factor dependant upon each manufacturer's paint formulas. some of these paints are general acrylics and some are specific fabric acrylics. i have seen both types sold and recommended in catalogs selling paints for fabric.  i have also used both types and have found brands of each type that i like just fine. 
      my only experience with watercolor on fabric was with traditional suminagashi inks and they washed out.  it would certainly be worth more research.  figuring out what works is half the fun.
      good luck,
      marie  
    • Susan Rex
      I am new to the list and have spent some time reading archives but didn t seem to find the answer to my question. I see reference to Golden and Liquitex
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 24, 2002
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        I am new to the list and have spent some time reading archives but didn't
        seem to find the answer to my question. I see reference to Golden and
        Liquitex acrylic paints. Are these marbling paints or are these the same
        acrylics that are used for painting pictures? If they are painters
        arcylics, then with the liquitex do you use thick, medium or thin viscosity
        and adjust them as necessary? The same question applies to the water colour
        paints used for paper. Are these artists paints and is there a brand name
        that is quite reliable and available in Canada?

        I did try a sample with the irridescent Setacolor but realized my paint was
        either too thick or my size not thick enough. However, the results I did
        get were quite thrilling. I use quite a bit of setacolor, for other
        projects, and was wondering if anyone has tried Pebeo's marbling colors.

        One last question. What about the hand of the fabric? Does the acrylic
        paint have much of an effect on the hand of silk scarves? I wouldn't be as
        concerned with the hand of cotton.

        Susan - Medicine Hat, Ab
      • Jan Bond
        Hi Susan, I use the Pebeo marbling colors, as well as the Pebeo Setacolor irridescents, and I really like them. The marbling colors don t need any additives,
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 24, 2002
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          Hi Susan,

          I use the Pebeo marbling colors, as well as the Pebeo Setacolor
          irridescents, and I really like them. The marbling colors don't need any
          additives, but the irridescents need to be thinned. I usually mix them
          about 1 to 1 with distilled water. Some of the irridescents are quite
          pale, but others work well. The gold and copper are really nice.

          I tried Liquitex--you mix the regular artist acrylics with Liquitex Marble
          Ease marbling medium. The Marble Ease is quite toxic smelling, and has
          warnings about inhaling it. I loved the brilliance of the colors, and the
          Liquitex seemed to work on more papers than the Pebeo. But, when it dried
          the colors were really dull. I did salvage some of the papers by varnishing
          them with an acrylic medium. I haven't tried Liquitex on fabric.

          Jan
          Vancouver, BC

          At 10:35 AM 2/24/2002 -0800, you wrote:
          >I am new to the list and have spent some time reading archives but didn't
          >seem to find the answer to my question. I see reference to Golden and
          >Liquitex acrylic paints. Are these marbling paints or are these the same
          >acrylics that are used for painting pictures? If they are painters
          >arcylics, then with the liquitex do you use thick, medium or thin viscosity
          >and adjust them as necessary? The same question applies to the water colour
          >paints used for paper. Are these artists paints and is there a brand name
          >that is quite reliable and available in Canada?
          >
          >I did try a sample with the irridescent Setacolor but realized my paint was
          >either too thick or my size not thick enough. However, the results I did
          >get were quite thrilling. I use quite a bit of setacolor, for other
          >projects, and was wondering if anyone has tried Pebeo's marbling colors.
          >
          >One last question. What about the hand of the fabric? Does the acrylic
          >paint have much of an effect on the hand of silk scarves? I wouldn't be as
          >concerned with the hand of cotton.
          >
          >Susan - Medicine Hat, Ab
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
        • Sandy Thomas
          Hi Susan, I have marbled on several different cottons. I find the hand to not be much affected by the paints as only a very thin layer is adsorbed. The rest
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 24, 2002
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            Hi Susan,

            I have marbled on several different cottons. I find the "hand" to not be
            much affected by the paints as only a very thin layer is adsorbed. The rest
            rinses off. The briliance on fabric was directly affected by the smoothness
            of the fabric. A 200 count muslin looked very sharp. A previosly dyed and
            brushed fabric looked dull. Many fabrics that are colored by the
            manufacturer will not take the paint!!! If you take a white fabric and dye
            it yourself it will probaply be fine. Something in the colorfasting process
            repells the paint I think.
            I have a beautiful silk scarf that I bought from a marbler that is very soft
            and pliant. I do not believe the paint affected the 'hand' of the silk at
            all.

            sandy in Fremont Ca.
          • Gail MacKenzie
            Hi! I used to do the street craft show in Fremont, and Palo Alto and Mountain View..etc. Check the label: have you got one of my scarves?? I¹d like to hear
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 26, 2002
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              Hi!

              I used to do the street craft show in Fremont, and Palo Alto and Mountain
              View..etc. Check the label: have you got one of my scarves?? I¹d like to
              hear from you..how is it holding up, the colors and when you got it.

              Best wishes, Gail MacKenzie



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