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Intro

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  • elpmet56
    Hello, and thank you for permission to join your group. I can not say my papers have been lucretive but I do have some binders who favor my style.
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 23, 2006
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      Hello, and thank you for permission to join your group. I can not say
      my papers have been lucretive but I do have some binders who favor my
      style. Unfortunately I am not sure what to do about laser print copies
      of my work. At least one of my binders buys originals and then makes
      copies. I have two concerns with his practice: 1. Will laser copies
      last 2. I get no money on the copies. If anyone can tell me how they
      prevent such nonsense I'd love to know about it. Note, I do not want
      to destroy what little business comes my way in the process. In the
      mean time I am slowly working my way through the past posts. Cheers to
      all! Jennifer
    • Lavinia Adler
      Hello, Jennifer -- If you go to the Yahoo groups site and get into the Marblers group area, you can search for copyright (box at the top of the screen) and
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 24, 2006
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        Hello, Jennifer --
        If you go to the Yahoo groups site and get into the Marblers' group
        area, you can search for "copyright" (box at the top of the screen) and
        find some messages related to that subject. I'm not sure how helpful
        they'll be, 'cause I don't have time to look through them now, but you'll
        probably get some useful info.

        Lavinia
        > ...
        >Unfortunately I am not sure what to do about laser print
        > copies
        > of my work. At least one of my binders buys originals and then makes
        > copies. I have two concerns with his practice: 1. Will laser copies
        > last 2. I get no money on the copies. If anyone can tell me how they
        > prevent such nonsense I'd love to know about it. Note, I do not
        > want
        > to destroy what little business comes my way in the process. In the
        > mean time I am slowly working my way through the past posts. Cheers
        > to
        > all! Jennifer
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Sue
        Hi Jennifer I haven¹t posted before, as I just dabble in marbling a bit and was looking for info. However I am an illustrator, so I do know a bit about having
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 25, 2006
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          Hi Jennifer

          I haven¹t posted before, as I just dabble in marbling a bit and was looking
          for info. However I am an illustrator, so I do know a bit about having
          artwork reproduced.

          When you create a piece of artwork, the copyright automatically belongs to
          you, unless you assign it in writing to someone else. A lot of people think
          that if they buy a painting say, they can do what they like with it. Maybe
          this is what the binder thinks. But what they have bought is the actual
          artwork, but not the right to reproduce it ‹ that is still yours unless you
          have specifically sold it to them.

          I think what I would do is assume they have copied the work out of ignorance
          rather than knowingly trying to cheat you. I would then say that you have
          discovered that they have copied it, and would they like a license to
          reproduce it so they are no longer breaking the law? The license will cover
          them for an agreed usage, e.g. endpapers, an agreed territory, e.g. North
          America, for an agreed period, e.g. 3 years. What you charge them for the
          license depends mainly on how much they are likely to use it ‹ if they are
          going to use it to cover a range of stationary products for a big high
          street store, then you would charge a lot more than if they were just using
          it for endpapers for a small circulation book. My guess would be that you
          should charge anything from £50 for minimal usage up to £1000 for something
          that would be very widely used. (Sorry, I am in UK, I don¹t know about
          dollars).

          You could sell them copyright instead of a license, then you can no longer
          reproduce that piece yourself, and they can do whatever they want with it,
          including selling it on, but that would only be right at the top end of the
          price range.

          I know there are a few variations between US and UK copyright laws, US
          generally being a bit less kind to creators, but they work on the same
          principle.

          Why not ask a US based textile designers group or an illustrators group for
          their take on the situation? They might give you a better idea of reasonable
          fees too.

          Best wishes

          Sue



          On 23/4/06 7:44 pm, "elpmet56" <elpmet56@...> wrote:

          > Hello, and thank you for permission to join your group. I can not say
          > my papers have been lucretive but I do have some binders who favor my
          > style. Unfortunately I am not sure what to do about laser print copies
          > of my work. At least one of my binders buys originals and then makes
          > copies. I have two concerns with his practice: 1. Will laser copies
          > last 2. I get no money on the copies. If anyone can tell me how they
          > prevent such nonsense I'd love to know about it. Note, I do not want
          > to destroy what little business comes my way in the process. In the
          > mean time I am slowly working my way through the past posts. Cheers to
          > all! Jennifer
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          >
          > * Visit your group "Marbling <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling> " on
          > the web.
          > *
          > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > * Marbling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:Marbling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
          > *
          > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
          > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .
          >
          >
          >
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • irisnevins
          I have been behind on posts and saw this. if it is one of your customers doing this, I would have a lawyer for a very small fee write a cease and desist letter
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 25, 2006
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            I have been behind on posts and saw this. if it is one of your customers doing this, I would have a lawyer for a very small fee write a cease and desist letter (or else you will take further action for copyright infringement). It doesn't sound as though they are selling them commercially? If you want to maintain a relationship, I would personally write a letter saying it has come to your attention that they are doing this and that the sale of your paper to them does NOT transfer copyright privileges. If they would like to do this they must pay you at least royalties or a fee per year. As mentioned below, say you are sure they did not understand the law, but you are the owner of the image.

            It doesn't sound as if this person will license the image from you, he may either apologize and say he will not do it again, or you may lose a customer if he gets angry, but I know it would bother me so much I wouldn't care if I lost the customer.

            I stamp all my papers on the back saying sale of this work doesn't transfer copyright or reproduction priveleges. If usage is desired they must get written permission. You can make up a similar stamp and things will be clear.

            Not to defend the binder, but truly many people don't know or think about it. They think they bought the paper, they own the image, period. It never occurs to them, and surprisingly more than you think, they will be nice about it. So I would contact them yourself first, if that doesn't work, a cease and desist letter from a lawyer usually scares them. It should be very cheap to get this. If you don't want to spend the money you can look up form letters either in computer programs that have wills and other documents or maybe on the web. I would add that your attorney advised you to send this letter. Send it registered mail. Give them a week to respond and say if you do not hear from them you will have to take further action.

            You do not need to have a registered copyright or a copyright number, though it does carry some clout.

            iris nevins
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Sue<mailto:sue_hagerty@...>
            To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2006 12:28 PM
            Subject: Re: [Marbling] Intro


            Hi Jennifer

            I haven¹t posted before, as I just dabble in marbling a bit and was looking
            for info. However I am an illustrator, so I do know a bit about having
            artwork reproduced.

            When you create a piece of artwork, the copyright automatically belongs to
            you, unless you assign it in writing to someone else. A lot of people think
            that if they buy a painting say, they can do what they like with it. Maybe
            this is what the binder thinks. But what they have bought is the actual
            artwork, but not the right to reproduce it < that is still yours unless you
            have specifically sold it to them.

            I think what I would do is assume they have copied the work out of ignorance
            rather than knowingly trying to cheat you. I would then say that you have
            discovered that they have copied it, and would they like a license to
            reproduce it so they are no longer breaking the law? The license will cover
            them for an agreed usage, e.g. endpapers, an agreed territory, e.g. North
            America, for an agreed period, e.g. 3 years. What you charge them for the
            license depends mainly on how much they are likely to use it < if they are
            going to use it to cover a range of stationary products for a big high
            street store, then you would charge a lot more than if they were just using
            it for endpapers for a small circulation book. My guess would be that you
            should charge anything from £50 for minimal usage up to £1000 for something
            that would be very widely used. (Sorry, I am in UK, I don¹t know about
            dollars).

            You could sell them copyright instead of a license, then you can no longer
            reproduce that piece yourself, and they can do whatever they want with it,
            including selling it on, but that would only be right at the top end of the
            price range.

            I know there are a few variations between US and UK copyright laws, US
            generally being a bit less kind to creators, but they work on the same
            principle.

            Why not ask a US based textile designers group or an illustrators group for
            their take on the situation? They might give you a better idea of reasonable
            fees too.

            Best wishes

            Sue



            On 23/4/06 7:44 pm, "elpmet56" <elpmet56@...<mailto:elpmet56@...>> wrote:

            > Hello, and thank you for permission to join your group. I can not say
            > my papers have been lucretive but I do have some binders who favor my
            > style. Unfortunately I am not sure what to do about laser print copies
            > of my work. At least one of my binders buys originals and then makes
            > copies. I have two concerns with his practice: 1. Will laser copies
            > last 2. I get no money on the copies. If anyone can tell me how they
            > prevent such nonsense I'd love to know about it. Note, I do not want
            > to destroy what little business comes my way in the process. In the
            > mean time I am slowly working my way through the past posts. Cheers to
            > all! Jennifer
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            > * Visit your group "Marbling <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling>> " on
            > the web.
            > *
            > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > * Marbling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com>
            > <mailto:Marbling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe<mailto:Marbling-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>>
            > *
            > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
            > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/<http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>> .
            >
            >
            >
            >




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