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Re: [Marbling] NYPL digital collection

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  • paulhenrydesign@aol.com
    try this link it s long but....
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 21, 2006
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      try this link

      it's long but....


      _http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=339175&imageID=491530&parent_id=244729&word=&snum=&s=¬word=&d=&c=&f=&sSc
      ope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&total=7&num=0&imgs=12&pNum=&pos=1_
      (http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=339175&imageID=49153
      0&parent_id=244729&word=&snum=&s=¬word=&d=&c=&f=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&to
      tal=7&num=0&imgs=12&pNum=&pos=1)


      paul

      www.paulhenrydesign.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • katherine coddington
      The Tiger s Eye piece is item 64, on the 6th page of thumbnails. The links seem to get chopped up by Yahoo so if you cut and paste the whole thing they might
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 21, 2006
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        The Tiger's Eye piece is item 64, on the 6th page of thumbnails. The links seem to get chopped up by Yahoo so if you cut and paste the whole thing they might work.

        There are many others worth seeing if you have the time. William Augustus Spencer was an American book collector who lived in Paris and seemed to have commissioned a number of beautiful bindings while he was there. He especially supported a binder by the name of Jean Stroobants, who used the most amazing marbled paper in his binding. If you search that him in the "names" you will see what I mean. He does not seem to have done the Tiger's Eye marbling, but as his leather bindings are very plain (compared to a number of the French bindings) and it is the marbling that is spectacular, I wonder if he was the marbler as well.

        Katherine


        Lavinia Adler <laviniaa@...> wrote:
        I'd really llike to see that beautiful example of marbling, but haven't
        time to go through all the books. Do you remember which title it was in?

        Lavinia

        On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 14:05:56 -0000 "katherine coddington"
        <kcoddington@...> writes:

        > there is one Tiger's eye that is amazing (should be called God's
        > eye).
        > The specific link for that one is too complicated to post here, but
        > go to the main page:
        >
        http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/explore/dgexplore.cfm?topic=ar
        ts



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      • Lavinia Adler
        Thanks! It worked... and what a wonderful marbled design it is. ... _http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&s
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 21, 2006
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          Thanks! It worked... and what a wonderful marbled design it is.

          On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:17:51 EST paulhenrydesign@... writes:
          > try this link
          >
          > it's long but....
          >
          >
          >
          _http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&s
          trucID=339175&imageID=491530&parent_id=244729&word=&snum=&s=¬word=&d=&
          c=&f=&sSc
          > ope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&total=7&num=0&imgs=12&pNum=&pos=1_
          >
          (http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&s
          trucID=339175&imageID=49153
          >
          0&parent_id=244729&word=&snum=&s=¬word=&d=&c=&f=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabe
          l=&to
          > tal=7&num=0&imgs=12&pNum=&pos=1)
          >
          >
          > paul
          >
          > www.paulhenrydesign.com
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • sixshort
          Hi Katherine, Thanks for a very interesting collection of late 19th and early 20thC bindings and endpapers. It takes forever to go through all the examples.
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 23, 2006
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            Hi Katherine, Thanks for a very interesting collection of late 19th
            and early 20thC bindings and endpapers. It takes forever to go
            through all the examples. If anyone wants to see a few excellent
            examples, I have noted "Les Chevalier des Touches" (Tiger Eye); "Au
            Petit bonheur - comedie en un acte" (Figure 8 across a non pareil
            pattern); "Estampes at livres"; "Francesco Cenci e la sua famiglia"-
            (which shows a number of different styles of marbling in the
            endpapers).

            There are several beautiful examples of oil marbling as well as the
            above combed patterns,( "Flingot") and some gorgeous stylus patterns
            with added Spanish laying of the paper (Histoire de mes Betes).

            If anyone has the time, it is worth looking at all the examples.
            Happy computering, Joan Ajala


            "F--- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "katherine coddington"
            <kcoddington@...> wrote:
            >
            > Being in Canada, I don't check out all the US sites, but a friend
            just
            > sent me a link to the New York Public Library Digital Collection
            and
            > suggested that the bindings in the Spencer Collection were
            > interesting. There are some marbled papers that are just
            beautiful --
            > there is one Tiger's eye that is amazing (should be called God's
            eye).
            > The specific link for that one is too complicated to post here,
            but
            > go to the main page:
            > http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/explore/dgexplore.cfm?
            topic=arts
            >
            > Scroll down to the "French 19th-Century Bindings in the Collection
            of
            > William A. Spencer" about half-way down the page: it is definately
            > worth the browse.
            >
          • Jake Benson
            Thanks for sharing that information about the NYPL web site. The Spencer collection at NYPL is home to some very interesting and unique works of marbling.
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 23, 2006
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              Thanks for sharing that information about the NYPL web site. The Spencer collection at
              NYPL is home to some very interesting and unique works of marbling. Last summer I was
              able to visit and see a small two small Japanese manuscripts that were made with
              suminagashi paper. The first was Jap MS 1-48-1, a copy of Shokubutsu ze-no-doku
              (Pictures of Plants). c. 1700. (neglected to note the pagination, binding stucture- I believe
              it is a pamphlet wrapper). It is described as "an herbal for the care of man or beast". The
              outer paper wrapper of the book was an example of suminagashi that was applied over a
              piece of kumogami or "cloud paper". This is a kind of decorative paper made during the
              paper-making process. Basically, Indigo blue pulp fibers are poured in and produce soft
              mottled bands of blue within the sheet. Kumogami was often used for tanzaku by poets.

              The way the marbling was applied was juxtaposed to the pattern of kumogami-a band of
              blue in the kumogami. The distance and juxtaposition of arcs within the suminagashi
              pattern and the kumogami banding effectively rendered the aesthetic sense of a kind of
              abstract landscape. Or better yet, perhaps a "seascape" of ocean waves and clouds. I have
              never seen suminagashi combined with kumogami before, so this was very intriguing to
              me and visually quite stunning.

              the second item was a Japanese booklet decorated with suminagashi. The item number
              for this book is JAP 88-1 (may also be 1-88-1). It is a copy of Kindai Shuka, which is
              described as "an ancient anthology".

              It is a kind of two-section style of binding. I looked up the style in the book by Kojiro
              Ikegami, but I didn't see anything exactly like it. It is similar to the ledger or receipt book;
              only two sections are sewn together, through the folds, instead of just one. They are sewn
              at four sewing holes, and I think the thread makes a “figure eight” pattern through both of
              the sections. In through the top, out the hole to the bottom, out the hole, back to the top,
              turn around at the end, and so on. After asking japanese book conservator Kiyoshi imai
              about the specific style of binding, he replied that it might possibly have been something
              of a "one-off' booklet that was made after the scholar who wrote took their notes.

              The outer folios of both of the sections were wrapped with 2 laminated suminagashi
              papers. Hence the pattern on the front cover did not match the back of the cover, nor
              were they conjoined. The pattern seen on the first section was composed of a more
              traditional suminagashi pattern over a paper that had been printed in an abstract pattern
              using silver colored pigment (possibly tin? It was not tarnished like silver and looked very
              dull)

              The pattern on the back cover was very unusual variation of a more common pattern. It
              was of a long narrow horizontal oval of concentric blue and black rings. Only in this case
              the outermost band was stylized in a manner reminiscent to combing seem in Islamic and
              Western forms of marbling. The hair was used to tool only in a short depth- to the next
              band, and that was all. This was repeated around the entire circumference of the oval.
              After observing the pattern I theorize that the marbler may have used a single (horse?) hair
              to accomplish this. So I will have to try out my theory and see if I can reproduce the
              pattern.

              As a result of the way that the pattern was applied to the paper, and then the way that the
              paper was used in the binding, you only see half of the oval as a result on the back cover.
              The application had a very unusual aesthetic about it, unlike other examples of
              suminagashi I have seen applied in books and manuscripts.

              There is more to write about what is in the Spencer collection, but I have to stop here for
              now. Unfortunately these images are not featured on the NYPL web site. There is also a
              collection of decorated papers that I had no time to go through. Has anyone else on this
              list possibly taken the time to rummage through those boxes NYPL? Care to share with us
              what you saw?

              Jake Benson
            • Jake Benson
              Here s a link to an image of what is called kumogami in japanese- cloud paper used for a calligraphy scroll: http://www2u.biglobe.ne.jp/~taniguti/D-043b.htm
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 23, 2006
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                Here's a link to an image of what is called kumogami in japanese- "cloud paper" used for a
                calligraphy scroll:

                http://www2u.biglobe.ne.jp/~taniguti/D-043b.htm
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