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Re: drying rack, was very large trays

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  • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
    Hi John, do you want hang up your sheets, or do you prefer to dry them lying flat? For hanging, I use the normal collapsible drying racks for laundry, the
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 18, 2006
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      Hi John,

      do you want hang up your sheets, or do you prefer to dry them lying flat?

      For hanging, I use the normal collapsible drying racks for laundry, the variety that has
      enamelled rods instead of lines, plus ordinary clothes pegs. Sounds rather profane but
      works perfectly and can be put into a dark and quiet corner when you're through for the
      day, and it's cheap.

      For laying them flat, my husband has designed a folding rack for me that is fixed to the
      wall and can make itself next to invisible when it is not needed. Gives a certain amount of
      work while building it, preferably by a person who knows how to glue and saw wood and
      how to drill wide wholes.

      Susanne Krause

      --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "angchengsiew" <angchengsiew@...> wrote:
      >
      > Since we are on the subject of equipment, I appreciate suggestions for
      > drying rack in a very small space. Pictures would be even better,
      > please place them in the photo album section.
      >
    • carylhanc@aol.com
      Hi! I purchased an umbrella-type clothes pole from a local hardware store (it was a special order). It folds up like an umbrella and lives in its box
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 18, 2006
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        Hi!
        I purchased an "umbrella-type" clothes pole from a local hardware store (it
        was a special order). It folds up like an umbrella and lives in its box
        (about 8"x8"x65") when not in use. I bought some cinder blocks (the cube shape,
        not rectangular) with the single hole to support the pole. Since the pole is
        smaller than the hole in the cinder block, I stuff the hole with hunks of
        styrofoam to stabilize the pole. The clothespole opens up to about 48" on a
        side, and has maybe 10 lines strung between the 4 support arms. I have a heavy
        fabric painters' drop cloth that I put beneath the pole, and when that gets
        gloppy with size or paint, it goes in the washing machine. The pole cost about
        $50, the cinder blocks about $1 each, and the drop cloth about $10. Oh,
        yes, and a couple of packages of clothespins!

        I like this because, depending on the weather, I can put the pole up on my
        deck, or in my laundry room or garage.
        HTH!
        Caryl Hancock, Indianapolis


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • irisnevins
        I use those metal strips for shelving, and have one on one wall, then an opposite wall. They have holes in them. Every sixth row or so I tie a nylon line, thin
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 18, 2006
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          I use those metal strips for shelving, and have one on one wall, then an opposite wall. They have holes in them. Every sixth row or so I tie a nylon line, thin one from one end to the other. In a space, maybe I am guessing 6 x 10 feet I can dry 144 papers. If I am crazy enough to do that many in one day ...and have been...there is room. I drip into plastic pans, keep moving them under newly done papers. You have to check the papers don't stick together though, they are pretty close. You get used to it! I hang with clothes pins. Been doing this 28 years this way!

          Iris NEvins
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: carylhanc@...<mailto:carylhanc@...>
          To: angchengsiew@...<mailto:angchengsiew@...> ; Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2006 10:13 AM
          Subject: Re: [Marbling] Re: drying rack, was very large trays


          Hi!
          I purchased an "umbrella-type" clothes pole from a local hardware store (it
          was a special order). It folds up like an umbrella and lives in its box
          (about 8"x8"x65") when not in use. I bought some cinder blocks (the cube shape,
          not rectangular) with the single hole to support the pole. Since the pole is
          smaller than the hole in the cinder block, I stuff the hole with hunks of
          styrofoam to stabilize the pole. The clothespole opens up to about 48" on a
          side, and has maybe 10 lines strung between the 4 support arms. I have a heavy
          fabric painters' drop cloth that I put beneath the pole, and when that gets
          gloppy with size or paint, it goes in the washing machine. The pole cost about
          $50, the cinder blocks about $1 each, and the drop cloth about $10. Oh,
          yes, and a couple of packages of clothespins!

          I like this because, depending on the weather, I can put the pole up on my
          deck, or in my laundry room or garage.
          HTH!
          Caryl Hancock, Indianapolis


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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        • angchengsiew
          Dear Susanne, I usually hang my papers. The collapsible laundary rack you describe is what I have at the moment. Its quite cumbersome since it has 3 folds(one
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 19, 2006
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            Dear Susanne,
            I usually hang my papers. The collapsible laundary rack you describe
            is what I have at the moment. Its quite cumbersome since it has 3
            folds(one middle and two wings?). Maybe I should look at other more
            compact models.

            Thanks for all other suggestions.

            --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "hamburgerbuntpapier_de"
            <studio@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi John,
            >
            > do you want hang up your sheets, or do you prefer to dry them lying
            flat?
            >
            > For hanging, I use the normal collapsible drying racks for laundry,
            the variety that has
            > enamelled rods instead of lines, plus ordinary clothes pegs. Sounds
            rather profane but
            > works perfectly and can be put into a dark and quiet corner when
            you're through for the
            > day, and it's cheap.
            >
            > For laying them flat, my husband has designed a folding rack for me
            that is fixed to the
            > wall and can make itself next to invisible when it is not needed.
            Gives a certain amount of
            > work while building it, preferably by a person who knows how to
            glue and saw wood and
            > how to drill wide wholes.
          • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
            Yes, they are cumbersome, and anyway the wings are useless for bigger formats ( I use 70 x 50cm, that is ca. 27.5 x 20 inch). I simply get hold of an iron-saw
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 19, 2006
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              Yes, they are cumbersome, and anyway the wings are useless for bigger formats ( I use 70
              x 50cm, that is ca. 27.5 x 20 inch). I simply get hold of an iron-saw and saw off the wings,
              makes the racks much more handy. When you use not only the rods but also the frame of
              the racks, there is room for 20 sheets per rack. As 80 to 85 full-size sheets are what I can
              do per day when the pattern and the weather gods allow, 4 racks are what I need. They
              last for years.

              Susanne

              --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "angchengsiew" <angchengsiew@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear Susanne,
              > I usually hang my papers. The collapsible laundary rack you describe
              > is what I have at the moment. Its quite cumbersome since it has 3
              > folds(one middle and two wings?). Maybe I should look at other more
              > compact models.
              >
              > Thanks for all other suggestions.
              >
              > --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "hamburgerbuntpapier_de"
              > <studio@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi John,
              > >
              > > do you want hang up your sheets, or do you prefer to dry them lying
              > flat?
              > >
              > > For hanging, I use the normal collapsible drying racks for laundry,
              > the variety that has
              > > enamelled rods instead of lines, plus ordinary clothes pegs. Sounds
              > rather profane but
              > > works perfectly and can be put into a dark and quiet corner when
              > you're through for the
              > > day, and it's cheap.
              > >
              > > For laying them flat, my husband has designed a folding rack for me
              > that is fixed to the
              > > wall and can make itself next to invisible when it is not needed.
              > Gives a certain amount of
              > > work while building it, preferably by a person who knows how to
              > glue and saw wood and
              > > how to drill wide wholes.
              >
            • Dolores Guffey
              This is how I dry my marbled paper, a method we used in a Don Guyot class and I ve used ever since as it literally takes up no space. You need a piece of
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 19, 2006
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                This is how I dry my marbled paper, a method we used in a Don Guyot class
                and I've used ever since as it literally takes up "no space." You need a
                piece of Masonite slightly larger than the paper size you are marbling. Lean
                it upright on the floor (I put newspaper underneath to catch any drips).
                Now, hang two sheets of newspaper on the board anchored with clothespins and
                attached your rinsed marbled paper to this with the clothespins then attach
                two more sheets of newspaper. Continue to sandwich the marbled papers
                between 2 sheets of newspaper until you have about 10 sheets of marbled
                paper, at which time you can take them off as a stack and put flat down on a
                surface until you are finished for the day. I put them on the floor in
                front of my refrigerator (overnight) and as the fridge cyles off & on warm
                air blows across the paper. In the morning the papers are nice and dry. At
                the end of your marbling session re-stack the marbled papers with only 1
                sheet of newspaper between them and let dry flat for 24 hours (the only
                space needed is the flat surface taken up by the stack of papers).

                NOW, a word of caution. Newsprint has changed over the years depending on
                what the printer is using... oil based ink, water based ink, or soy based
                ink. It is best to use the oldest newspapers you've saved (rather than
                "today's" paper) so that whatever ink used is as dry as can be. I keep a
                stack of newspapers that are at least a month old to use for marbling. If,
                by chance, a piece of newpaper sticks on your marbled paper, it can be
                removed by gently using an eraser to rub over the newsprint...but, only
                after the paper is thoroughly dry.

                Happy Marbling,

                d. guffey
              • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
                Hi Dolores, this I find rather uncomfortable to think about. While the drying process is taken good care of, another aspect is left out of consideration:
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 19, 2006
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                  Hi Dolores,

                  this I find rather uncomfortable to think about. While the drying process is taken good
                  care of, another aspect is left out of consideration: printing inks is only the smaller
                  problem compared to the fact that newsprint is very acidic paper. Wetting it like in
                  sandwiching it with freshly marbled sheets will make the acid wander into the marbled
                  paper. Why bother about selecting base paper of conservation grade quality when
                  acidifying it later? My restorer's soul hurts.

                  Susanne Krause

                  --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Dolores Guffey" <dguff@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > This is how I dry my marbled paper, a method we used in a Don Guyot class
                  > and I've used ever since as it literally takes up "no space." You need a
                  > piece of Masonite slightly larger than the paper size you are marbling. Lean
                  > it upright on the floor (I put newspaper underneath to catch any drips).
                  > Now, hang two sheets of newspaper on the board anchored with clothespins and
                  > attached your rinsed marbled paper to this with the clothespins then attach
                  > two more sheets of newspaper. Continue to sandwich the marbled papers
                  > between 2 sheets of newspaper until you have about 10 sheets of marbled
                  > paper, at which time you can take them off as a stack and put flat down on a
                  > surface until you are finished for the day. I put them on the floor in
                  > front of my refrigerator (overnight) and as the fridge cyles off & on warm
                  > air blows across the paper. In the morning the papers are nice and dry. At
                  > the end of your marbling session re-stack the marbled papers with only 1
                  > sheet of newspaper between them and let dry flat for 24 hours (the only
                  > space needed is the flat surface taken up by the stack of papers).
                  >
                  > NOW, a word of caution. Newsprint has changed over the years depending on
                  > what the printer is using... oil based ink, water based ink, or soy based
                  > ink. It is best to use the oldest newspapers you've saved (rather than
                  > "today's" paper) so that whatever ink used is as dry as can be. I keep a
                  > stack of newspapers that are at least a month old to use for marbling. If,
                  > by chance, a piece of newpaper sticks on your marbled paper, it can be
                  > removed by gently using an eraser to rub over the newsprint...but, only
                  > after the paper is thoroughly dry.
                  >
                  > Happy Marbling,
                  >
                  > d. guffey
                  >
                • John Ang
                  By sandwiching the freshly marbled paper between newspaper, wouldn t the marbled paper stick to the newspaper after it is dry since there would be some size
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 20, 2006
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                    By sandwiching the freshly marbled paper between
                    newspaper, wouldn't the marbled paper stick to the
                    newspaper after it is dry since there would be some
                    size remaining on the marbled paper,unless one rinses
                    the marbled paper throughly with water which I do not
                    normally do)

                    --- Dolores Guffey <dguff@...> wrote:

                    > This is how I dry my marbled paper, a method we used
                    > in a Don Guyot class
                    > and I've used ever since as it literally takes up
                    > "no space." You need a
                    > piece of Masonite slightly larger than the paper
                    > size you are marbling. Lean
                    > it upright on the floor (I put newspaper underneath
                    > to catch any drips).
                    > Now, hang two sheets of newspaper on the board
                    > anchored with clothespins and
                    > attached your rinsed marbled paper to this with the
                    > clothespins then attach
                    > two more sheets of newspaper. Continue to sandwich
                    > the marbled papers
                    > between 2 sheets of newspaper until you have about
                    > 10 sheets of marbled
                    > paper, at which time you can take them off as a
                    > stack and put flat down on a
                    > surface until you are finished for the day. I put
                    > them on the floor in
                    > front of my refrigerator (overnight) and as the
                    > fridge cyles off & on warm
                    > air blows across the paper. In the morning the
                    > papers are nice and dry. At
                    > the end of your marbling session re-stack the
                    > marbled papers with only 1
                    > sheet of newspaper between them and let dry flat for
                    > 24 hours (the only
                    > space needed is the flat surface taken up by the
                    > stack of papers).


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                  • Santure, Lynn A
                    I balance yard stinks across my bath tub from the shower curtain rod to the tile on the other side. (The tile stops there so there is a little ledge between
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 20, 2006
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                      I balance yard stinks across my bath tub from the shower curtain rod to the
                      tile on the other side. (The tile stops there so there is a little ledge
                      between the tile and the wall). I then use cloths pins to hang my sheets
                      from the yard sticks. The inevitable dripping gets washed away in the tub
                      when I turn the water on.
                    • Laura Sims
                      John, When I used Don s method in the past I had to make sure the newspapers were about 6 months old to insure that the print was completely dry. Best, Laura
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 20, 2006
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                        John,

                        When I used Don's method in the past I had to make
                        sure the newspapers were about 6 months old to insure
                        that the print was completely dry.

                        Best,
                        Laura

                        --- John Ang <angchengsiew@...> wrote:

                        > By sandwiching the freshly marbled paper between
                        > newspaper, wouldn't the marbled paper stick to the
                        > newspaper after it is dry since there would be some
                        > size remaining on the marbled paper,unless one
                        > rinses
                        > the marbled paper throughly with water which I do
                        > not
                        > normally do)
                        >
                        > --- Dolores Guffey <dguff@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > This is how I dry my marbled paper, a method we
                        > used
                        > > in a Don Guyot class
                        > > and I've used ever since as it literally takes up
                        > > "no space." You need a
                        > > piece of Masonite slightly larger than the paper
                        > > size you are marbling. Lean
                        > > it upright on the floor (I put newspaper
                        > underneath
                        > > to catch any drips).
                        > > Now, hang two sheets of newspaper on the board
                        > > anchored with clothespins and
                        > > attached your rinsed marbled paper to this with
                        > the
                        > > clothespins then attach
                        > > two more sheets of newspaper. Continue to
                        > sandwich
                        > > the marbled papers
                        > > between 2 sheets of newspaper until you have about
                        > > 10 sheets of marbled
                        > > paper, at which time you can take them off as a
                        > > stack and put flat down on a
                        > > surface until you are finished for the day. I put
                        > > them on the floor in
                        > > front of my refrigerator (overnight) and as the
                        > > fridge cyles off & on warm
                        > > air blows across the paper. In the morning the
                        > > papers are nice and dry. At
                        > > the end of your marbling session re-stack the
                        > > marbled papers with only 1
                        > > sheet of newspaper between them and let dry flat
                        > for
                        > > 24 hours (the only
                        > > space needed is the flat surface taken up by the
                        > > stack of papers).
                        >
                        >
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                      • irisnevins
                        John...when I teach everyone takes home wet and mainly non-rinsed papers.... my paints if you work right need no rinsing.... so many are still wet at the end.
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 20, 2006
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                          John...when I teach everyone takes home wet and mainly non-rinsed papers.... my paints if you work right need no rinsing.... so many are still wet at the end. They layer in newspaper to go home, and there were never any complaints about sticking, however they are still a little damp when they peel the paper off I think. Then they lay them around a room to totally dry.

                          I have seen Don Guyot at a class do this, and though rinsed, I was amazed they don't seem to stick either. I find it easier and quicker to hang and drip over buckets.
                          iris nevins
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: John Ang<mailto:angchengsiew@...>
                          To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Monday, February 20, 2006 4:57 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Marbling] Re: drying rack, was very large trays


                          By sandwiching the freshly marbled paper between
                          newspaper, wouldn't the marbled paper stick to the
                          newspaper after it is dry since there would be some
                          size remaining on the marbled paper,unless one rinses
                          the marbled paper throughly with water which I do not
                          normally do)

                          --- Dolores Guffey <dguff@...<mailto:dguff@...>> wrote:

                          > This is how I dry my marbled paper, a method we used
                          > in a Don Guyot class
                          > and I've used ever since as it literally takes up
                          > "no space." You need a
                          > piece of Masonite slightly larger than the paper
                          > size you are marbling. Lean
                          > it upright on the floor (I put newspaper underneath
                          > to catch any drips).
                          > Now, hang two sheets of newspaper on the board
                          > anchored with clothespins and
                          > attached your rinsed marbled paper to this with the
                          > clothespins then attach
                          > two more sheets of newspaper. Continue to sandwich
                          > the marbled papers
                          > between 2 sheets of newspaper until you have about
                          > 10 sheets of marbled
                          > paper, at which time you can take them off as a
                          > stack and put flat down on a
                          > surface until you are finished for the day. I put
                          > them on the floor in
                          > front of my refrigerator (overnight) and as the
                          > fridge cyles off & on warm
                          > air blows across the paper. In the morning the
                          > papers are nice and dry. At
                          > the end of your marbling session re-stack the
                          > marbled papers with only 1
                          > sheet of newspaper between them and let dry flat for
                          > 24 hours (the only
                          > space needed is the flat surface taken up by the
                          > stack of papers).


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