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Re: [Marbling] drains

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  • irisnevins
    I am with you Gail... I think many people are worried about the cadmiums. We need to remember this was going to be banned from art supplies a while back, and
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 11, 2006
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      I am with you Gail... I think many people are worried about the cadmiums. We need to remember this was going to be banned from art supplies a while back, and Don Guyot was intrumental in preventing that from happening, proving it was inert once in the ground and caused no harm. We also need to realize that it isn't some horrible chemical but a naturally occuring element. I even was once given a bottle of coloidal liquid vitamins that came dripping down some glacial rocks or some such, and they even listed cadmium as one of the minerals in the mix and it was being sold quite legally. I didn't take it, I figured I have accidentally absorbed enough cads already, mainly while making paint from powdered pigments, even through a mask.

      I use primarily natural pigments and carrageenan, and do dump down the drain into my own septic system, and live surrounded by almost 55 acres. While I wouldn't want to pour any proven toxic junk down my drains that would cause harm, I don't believe this causes harm. I don't know about alum, but I believe it is naturally occurring as well, but I only ever make what I need and cut it real close and don't tend to have any left to speak of going down any drains, I just use the solution til it's gone.

      I would imagine something like Drano would be more dangerous, it's lye based isn't it? Not sure. I use turpentine in miniscule amounts, maybe a few drop's worth may come off while washing a brush. If any of our materials were proven dangerous then I would be more worried, I don't believe they are though, not for water color or acrylic marbling anyway. Not sure about oil, but artist have been pouring oil paints down drains for ages....don't know what if any effects have occurred say in a large city over a hundred years or so.

      Iris Nevins

      <<<<<<> Not quite so Patri, when one lives on 165 acres. When the dumped ³stuff²
      > eventually seeps through the earth¹s layers to the aquifer, it is quite
      > filtered and harmless.
      >>>>>
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Gail MacKenzie<mailto:gailmackenzi@...>
      To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2006 12:17 PM
      Subject: Re: [Marbling] drains


      > One member just wrote "my drains go nowhere". I rather doubt that. Most
      > drains either go out to a leeching field or into a dry well. Either way,
      > the dumped "stuff" eventually seeps through the earths layers to the
      > aquifer. Not good.
      > Patri
      >
      > Not quite so Patri, when one lives on 165 acres. When the dumped ³stuff²
      > eventually seeps through the earth¹s layers to the aquifer, it is quite
      > filtered and harmless.
      >
      >
      > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
      >
      > * Visit your group "Marbling <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling>> " on
      > the web.
      > *
      >
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      Yahoo! Groups Links









      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
      It is the amount and the way of contact that count. Tens of thousands of substances have (at least) two faces. Highly toxic substances (incl. nuclear matter)
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 13, 2006
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        It is the amount and the way of contact that count. Tens of thousands of substances have
        (at least) two faces. Highly toxic substances (incl. nuclear matter) can heal - or kill,
        depending on how much is applied how and when. Many of them don't hurt the proverbial
        fly in tiny dilutions but, as they cannot be got rid of one way or another, will do so in the
        long run; and by 'in the long run' I mean decades or centuries. So the only way to help
        save not only our health but also our world for the generations to come would be to avoid
        anything that is doubtful.

        Susanne Krause

        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "irisnevins" <irisnevins@v...> wrote:
        >
        > I am with you Gail... I think many people are worried about the cadmiums. We need to
        remember this was going to be banned from art supplies a while back, and Don Guyot was
        intrumental in preventing that from happening, proving it was inert once in the ground
        and caused no harm. We also need to realize that it isn't some horrible chemical but a
        naturally occuring element. I even was once given a bottle of coloidal liquid vitamins that
        came dripping down some glacial rocks or some such, and they even listed cadmium as
        one of the minerals in the mix and it was being sold quite legally. I didn't take it, I figured I
        have accidentally absorbed enough cads already, mainly while making paint from
        powdered pigments, even through a mask.
        >
        > I use primarily natural pigments and carrageenan, and do dump down the drain into my
        own septic system, and live surrounded by almost 55 acres. While I wouldn't want to pour
        any proven toxic junk down my drains that would cause harm, I don't believe this causes
        harm. I don't know about alum, but I believe it is naturally occurring as well, but I only ever
        make what I need and cut it real close and don't tend to have any left to speak of going
        down any drains, I just use the solution til it's gone.
        >
        > I would imagine something like Drano would be more dangerous, it's lye based isn't it?
        Not sure. I use turpentine in miniscule amounts, maybe a few drop's worth may come off
        while washing a brush. If any of our materials were proven dangerous then I would be
        more worried, I don't believe they are though, not for water color or acrylic marbling
        anyway. Not sure about oil, but artist have been pouring oil paints down drains for
        ages....don't know what if any effects have occurred say in a large city over a hundred
        years or so.
        >
        > Iris Nevins
        >
        > <<<<<<> Not quite so Patri, when one lives on 165 acres. When the dumped ³stuff²
        > > eventually seeps through the earth¹s layers to the aquifer, it is quite
        > > filtered and harmless.
        > >>>>>
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Gail MacKenzie<mailto:gailmackenzi@s...>
        > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2006 12:17 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Marbling] drains
        >
        >
        > > One member just wrote "my drains go nowhere". I rather doubt that. Most
        > > drains either go out to a leeching field or into a dry well. Either way,
        > > the dumped "stuff" eventually seeps through the earths layers to the
        > > aquifer. Not good.
        > > Patri
        > >
        > > Not quite so Patri, when one lives on 165 acres. When the dumped ³stuff²
        > > eventually seeps through the earth¹s layers to the aquifer, it is quite
        > > filtered and harmless.
        > >
        > >
        > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        > >
        > > * Visit your group "Marbling <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling<http://
        groups.yahoo.com/group/Marbling>> " on
        > > the web.
        > > *
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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