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Re: [Marbling] Marbling and marbleizing

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  • David Graham
    Didn t know there was confusion. Always took marbelizing to be exactly what you stated. As for marbling, have always taken it to be transfering a floating
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 17, 2005
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      Didn't know there was confusion.
      Always took "marbelizing" to be exactly what you stated.
      As for marbling, have always taken it to be transfering a floating
      pattern onto paper, cloth, or any other receptive substrate.
      What is the supposed point of confusion?
      Dave Graham

      On 4/17/05, hamburgerbuntpapier_de <hamburgerbuntpapier@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Could it be that the expression 'marblelizing' means to paint 'marble' with the painter's
      > techniques and tools on paper, wood or any material that is cheaper than the real thing?
      > As opposed to the expression 'marbling' for what most members of the list do by taking
      > off floating patterns with a sheet of paper?
      > ...asks yours truly, a non-native-English-speaking German decorated paper-maker who is
      > deep into nomenclature and hopes that one or the other of you has given this a thought or
      > two...
      >
      > Susanne Krause
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
      Paul, is s not confusion, really, just tying up some loose ends. What we re trying to accomplish is a compilation of terms for decorated and decorative papers.
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 18, 2005
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        Paul, is's not confusion, really, just tying up some loose ends. What we're trying to
        accomplish is a compilation of terms for decorated and decorative papers. More loose
        ends than we have anyway is about the last thing we need. Kært barn ha' mange navne...
        translating roughly as: a beloved child has many names!

        Thank you all!

        Susanne Krause

        --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, David Graham <uuglypher@g...> wrote:
        > Didn't know there was confusion.
        > Always took "marbelizing" to be exactly what you stated.
        > As for marbling, have always taken it to be transfering a floating
        > pattern onto paper, cloth, or any other receptive substrate.
        > What is the supposed point of confusion?
        > Dave Graham
        >
        > On 4/17/05, hamburgerbuntpapier_de <hamburgerbuntpapier@t...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Could it be that the expression 'marblelizing' means to paint 'marble' with the
        painter's
        > > techniques and tools on paper, wood or any material that is cheaper than the real
        thing?
        > > As opposed to the expression 'marbling' for what most members of the list do by
        taking
        > > off floating patterns with a sheet of paper?
        > > ...asks yours truly, a non-native-English-speaking German decorated paper-maker
        who is
        > > deep into nomenclature and hopes that one or the other of you has given this a
        thought or
        > > two...
        > >
        > > Susanne Krause
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
      • paulhenrydesign@aol.com
        susanne, I;m not confused at all!! I think you meant David Graham! paul! [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 18, 2005
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          susanne,
          I;m not confused at all!! I think you meant David Graham!

          paul!


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
          Sorry, Paul, how silly of me to get mixed up. That s what comes from doing three things simultaneously. Susanne
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 18, 2005
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            Sorry, Paul, how silly of me to get mixed up. That's what comes from doing three things
            simultaneously.

            Susanne

            --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, paulhenrydesign@a... wrote:
            > susanne,
            > I;m not confused at all!! I think you meant David Graham!
            >
            > paul!
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Graham
            No, Paul; I m not confused either, just wondering why some seem to be, else why the need for this thread? Dave
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 18, 2005
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              No, Paul; I'm not confused either, just wondering why some seem to
              be, else why the need for this thread?
              Dave

              On 4/18/05, paulhenrydesign@... <paulhenrydesign@...> wrote:
              >
              > susanne,
              > I;m not confused at all!! I think you meant David Graham!
              >
              > paul!
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
              Why the need for this thread? This group is a good thing not just for marblers but also for marbling and, as a sidestep, for other techniques of making
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 19, 2005
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                Why the need for this thread?
                This group is a good thing not just for marblers but also for marbling and, as a sidestep,
                for other techniques of making decorated paper. I am a professional decorated paper-
                maker and a member of an international group of specialists that has been established for
                the purpose of compiling something in the kind of a multilingual (thesaurus or handbook
                or... not decided upon yet) on decorated and decorative papers. As you have perceived by
                now, English is not my native language, so any doubles or uncertainties about English -
                and, if it comes to that, American - terms have to be cleared up by talking to the
                craftsmen using them.
                There are very few decorating techniques that have one name only. That means clearing
                up as much as possible as closely as possible: who is using / has been using this term
                when and for what?, and if it is only for declaring a term false (on which grounds?) and
                giving the correct word. And to this very purpose, I have asked the group as a whole - in
                addition to what the others of our 'task force' say. Believe me, there have been many times
                when I have heard one technique or pattern named in ten ways by five people. It is this
                confusion we mean to tackle.

                This has grown to a length I did not intend. If there are more questions, please contact me
                off-list. Otherwise, the thread will really be questionable!

                Susanne Krause

                --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, David Graham <uuglypher@g...> wrote:
                > No, Paul; I'm not confused either, just wondering why some seem to
                > be, else why the need for this thread?
                > Dave
                >
                > On 4/18/05, paulhenrydesign@a... <paulhenrydesign@a...> wrote:
                > >
                > > susanne,
                > > I;m not confused at all!! I think you meant David Graham!
                > >
                > > paul!
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
              • Jake Benson
                I beleive the root of the misnomer marblizing is actually quite old, and was used on a in an old English marbling publication possibly going back to the 19th
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 19, 2005
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                  I beleive the root of the "misnomer" marblizing is actually quite old, and was used on a in
                  an old English marbling publication possibly going back to the 19th century. Right now, I
                  don't have time to check, but I think Pleger (1914) may have been one of them. I'll be
                  looking for this over the summer, as I know I have seen it...

                  Many people responded to my Q & A (to be posted shortly) that they thought "marblize" is
                  incorrect. Yet if some literature in the past has used the term, is it really so? We may
                  prefer to call it "marbling" and to use the verb "marble" rather than "marblizing" and
                  "marblize", but I'm not 100% certain that this is incorrect, just a preference on our part. I
                  don't find that any one term is consistently used by those who paint "faux marbling' or
                  'marblizing" either. So I think to define one word for one method and one for the other is
                  convenient, and helps to distinguish them apart, but they are not necessarily universal or
                  absolute.

                  That said, I do prefer to call it "marbling" and us the verb "to marble", in English...

                  Jake Benson
                • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
                  Yes. What it boils down to is a blend of correctness, preference and acceptance. The historical root of a term is one thing, understanding what the other
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 19, 2005
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                    Yes. What it boils down to is a blend of correctness, preference and acceptance. The
                    historical root of a term is one thing, understanding what the other person means today
                    quite another.

                    Susanne Krause

                    --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Jake Benson" <handbindery@b...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I beleive the root of the "misnomer" marblizing is actually quite old, and was used on a
                    in
                    > an old English marbling publication possibly going back to the 19th century. Right now,
                    I
                    > don't have time to check, but I think Pleger (1914) may have been one of them. I'll be
                    > looking for this over the summer, as I know I have seen it...
                    >
                    > Many people responded to my Q & A (to be posted shortly) that they thought "marblize"
                    is
                    > incorrect. Yet if some literature in the past has used the term, is it really so? We may
                    > prefer to call it "marbling" and to use the verb "marble" rather than "marblizing" and
                    > "marblize", but I'm not 100% certain that this is incorrect, just a preference on our part.
                    I
                    > don't find that any one term is consistently used by those who paint "faux marbling' or
                    > 'marblizing" either. So I think to define one word for one method and one for the other
                    is
                    > convenient, and helps to distinguish them apart, but they are not necessarily universal
                    or
                    > absolute.
                    >
                    > That said, I do prefer to call it "marbling" and us the verb "to marble", in English...
                    >
                    > Jake Benson
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