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Patterns similar to marbling

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  • Jake Benson
    Brent is right to think of marbling patterns seen in some forms of glass making. Art historian Woodman Taylor pointed this out (I think during the Harvard
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 5, 2005
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      Brent is right to think of marbling patterns seen in some forms of glass making. Art
      historian Woodman Taylor pointed this out (I think during the Harvard 1986 symposium?).
      He noticed many patterns in marbling are similar to those found in ancient Egyptian core-
      form glass.

      Here is a great web site for this kind of ancient glass:

      http://www.touregypt.net/historicalessays/lifeinEgypt12.htm

      This summer I saw some small heart motifs in some later Ptolemaic examples in the Freer
      gallery at the Smithsonian.

      In addition to this Woodman found a reference made by some Japanese scholars who had
      noticed similarities between patterns in suminagashi and T'ang dynasty pottery.
      Unfortunately I cannot find an image for this on the web.

      I will add to this the patterns of what is some times called "Watered" or "Damascus" steel

      One contemporary metalworker who makes this steel can be seen here:

      http://www.artmetal.com/project/Gallery/Fiorini_W/

      scroll down to the bottom.

      The patterns are similar to a kind of marbled pattern found in polymer clays, very popular
      for making jewelry these days.... this too has ancient roots. Here are some sample of an
      artist making pens in the Japanese mokume gane technique

      http://www.skygrazer.com/polymerclay/gallery/pen1e.htm

      And finally, we must give credit what I think is the most ubiquitous form of surface-
      marbling, (or at least the most delicious, unless you are lactose intolerant or vegan).

      The marbled cheesecake.

      http://www.cheesecakealy.com/main.htm

      Of course some people have also misunderstood some of this information. I have now
      seen paper marbling attributed to Ancient Egypt and dated to 2,000 years ago, which of
      course, did not happen. Whether or not marbled paper was made in the T'ang dynasty
      cannot be proven either, although the source for Su Yi-Jian's account may date to that
      time....

      Marbled Cheesecakes? who knows? Is this French?

      Jake
    • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
      The etcher Caroline Saltzwedel developed an etching technique that resembles those 19th century marbling techniques done directly on the paper. She marbles
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 5, 2005
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        The etcher Caroline Saltzwedel developed an etching technique that resembles those 19th
        century marbling techniques done directly on the paper. She 'marbles' directly on the
        etching plate. Most exciting! Her website is www.hirundo-press.com if you want to have a
        look.
        Susanne Krause
      • IRIS NEVINS
        I have a friend who has these old roman and Egytian core glass things or even fragments for sale if anyone interested. Please email me if you want his address.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 6, 2005
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          I have a friend who has these old roman and Egytian core glass things or even fragments for sale if anyone interested. Please email me if you want his address.
          irisnevins
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Jake Benson<mailto:handbindery@...>
          To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2005 8:20 PM
          Subject: [Marbling] Patterns similar to marbling




          Brent is right to think of marbling patterns seen in some forms of glass making. Art
          historian Woodman Taylor pointed this out (I think during the Harvard 1986 symposium?).
          He noticed many patterns in marbling are similar to those found in ancient Egyptian core-
          form glass.

          Here is a great web site for this kind of ancient glass:

          http://www.touregypt.net/historicalessays/lifeinEgypt12.htm<http://www.touregypt.net/historicalessays/lifeinEgypt12.htm>

          This summer I saw some small heart motifs in some later Ptolemaic examples in the Freer
          gallery at the Smithsonian.

          In addition to this Woodman found a reference made by some Japanese scholars who had
          noticed similarities between patterns in suminagashi and T'ang dynasty pottery.
          Unfortunately I cannot find an image for this on the web.

          I will add to this the patterns of what is some times called "Watered" or "Damascus" steel

          One contemporary metalworker who makes this steel can be seen here:

          http://www.artmetal.com/project/Gallery/Fiorini_W/<http://www.artmetal.com/project/Gallery/Fiorini_W/>

          scroll down to the bottom.

          The patterns are similar to a kind of marbled pattern found in polymer clays, very popular
          for making jewelry these days.... this too has ancient roots. Here are some sample of an
          artist making pens in the Japanese mokume gane technique

          http://www.skygrazer.com/polymerclay/gallery/pen1e.htm<http://www.skygrazer.com/polymerclay/gallery/pen1e.htm>

          And finally, we must give credit what I think is the most ubiquitous form of surface-
          marbling, (or at least the most delicious, unless you are lactose intolerant or vegan).

          The marbled cheesecake.

          http://www.cheesecakealy.com/main.htm<http://www.cheesecakealy.com/main.htm>

          Of course some people have also misunderstood some of this information. I have now
          seen paper marbling attributed to Ancient Egypt and dated to 2,000 years ago, which of
          course, did not happen. Whether or not marbled paper was made in the T'ang dynasty
          cannot be proven either, although the source for Su Yi-Jian's account may date to that
          time....

          Marbled Cheesecakes? who knows? Is this French?

          Jake








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        • Gail MacKenzie
          ... Fascinating and wonderful...thanks for the site!! [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 6, 2005
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            > www.hirundo-press.com

            Fascinating and wonderful...thanks for the site!!


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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