Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Better Links

Expand Messages
  • Jake Benson
    Dear Susanne- and everyone else, Richard Wolfe certainly thinks that the use of marbling on these notes was a type of security device akin to a watermark that
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 8, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear Susanne- and everyone else,

      Richard Wolfe certainly thinks that the use of marbling on these notes
      was a type of security device akin to a watermark that confirmed the
      authenticity of the note to the bearer. However there is a little bit
      of a mystery about how and where it was done and by whom. For the
      notes that were printed by Bache, the grandson of Ben Franklin, it is
      said that Franklin supplied the paper. The marbling on that note is on
      the reverse side, and then printed over top, not just a border as seen
      here.

      Sometimes a link as it appears in the message has been cut off. I try
      and add brackets to the from and back, as this helps to preserve the
      format, but not always. You can copy and paste teh entire link, and
      sometimes this works better. However, I will explain how you can get
      to the images from the home pages.

      For the piece from the Museum of Iran:

      http://www.nationalmuseumofiran.com/en/col/1/gallery/pages/4376(34).htm

      The home page is :

      www.nationalmuseumofiran.com

      sometimes I find it easier to load the home page, then add the rest of
      the link once it is loaded in address bar.

      /en/col/1/gallery/pages/4376(34).htm

      The Divan of Anvari can be found by going to:

      http://www.artmuseums.harvard.edu/home_content.html

      On the bar across the screen, click on the link for "museums". A
      drop-down list will appear. Click on "Collections Online". This will
      bring up a screen from which you can search all of the collections. I
      typed in "Divan of Anvari" in the box under "Title". 28 images (not 50
      as first mmentioned) of this marvelous manuscript appear. The link I
      tried to send to the group is the second one that pops up, featuring a
      painting by the artist BASAWAN. Click on the link. Then click on the
      image to enlarge it. Not a bad image, though not as detailed as the
      Japanese e-museum. The marbling is very pale on these leaves, but it
      is easier to see some of it on the leaves that are without painting and
      feature only calligraphy. It does not specifically say it,

      As I mentioned befroe, this manuscript is important to our history due
      to the sheer volume of marbled papers used, and the manner in which
      both the paintings and calligrapy are executed directly over the
      marbled paper surface. I have observed this more often in pieces from
      India, and then to a lesser extent from Iran. I just found a book
      containing an image of an Ottoman example, but I have not encountered
      paintings directly over marbling from Ottoman Turkey before, as usually
      marbling is used as a border and adhered to a finished painting.

      and for Gail- thanks for your repsonse, though i must confess I am
      still just a student plunking along, here. For many years I thought
      the lotus sutra depicted in Ann Chambers book was an actual fan- and
      just a single item, not an entire book...and I've told other people as
      much in classes and workshops. The vague description given is
      misleading. It just says "fan-shaped sutra". So it is nice to learn
      that there are more- a lot more! and I'm still learning. It seems
      that every time I dive into this ocean there are luminous precious
      pearls waiting to be found and then scattered for everyone to see.


      I mentioned the Japanese book Ocho No Bijutsu. I got a copy through
      interlibrary loan. Here is the full citation:

      Ocho no bijutsu : Genji monogatari emaki to sanjurokunin kashu / henshu
      shippitsu Shirahata Yoshi. Published: Tokyo : Gakushu Kenkyusha, 1977.
      Shohan. 210 p. : ill. (some color, some folded), maps ; 38 cm.

      Refer to numbers 43, 79, and 83. Number 43 is black and white. It
      features a nature scene. The suminagashi is like the water, which
      flows around painted rocks and hills. It is really lovely and a very
      successful composition. The overall effect makes the suminagashi
      really looks like flowing water. The other paintings are scenes of
      Heian court life.

      Enjoy!

      Jake
    • Gail MacKenzie
      Jake, I spent a day, about 10 years ago, in the Philadelphia Historical Societies reading room, and, somehow, had access to Franklin¹s accounting diaries. He
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 8, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Jake, I spent a day, about 10 years ago, in the Philadelphia Historical
        Societies reading room, and, somehow, had access to Franklin¹s accounting
        diaries. He listed everything he brought, from whom and how much. There
        were several entries about marbled paper purchases and commissions and
        supplies. I wish I remember more clearly. Gail


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jake Benson
        Richard Wolfe has long wanted to establish a connection between marbling in= the US and Ben Franklin...but is reticent to do so given a paucity of evidence.
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 8, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Richard Wolfe has long wanted to establish a connection between marbling in=
          the US and
          Ben Franklin...but is reticent to do so given a paucity of evidence. Yet I=
          have often
          wondered if these marbled sheets were imported or not befor ethey were prin=
          ted upon.
          The $20 note seems to me like it would have to have been done "in house", b=
          ut I cannot
          say for certain.

          But you are saying that there were comissions for marbling in this book? s=
          o it may well be
          that he was making some amount of it- or his shop was. Would you remember =
          if the
          supplies were actually marbling supplies? colors and gum? Thanks for tell=
          ing me about
          this source though! I will do my best to find it.



          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, Gail MacKenzie <gailmackenzi@s...> wrote:
          > Jake, I spent a day, about 10 years ago, in the Philadelphia Historical
          > Societies reading room, and, somehow, had access to Franklin¹s accounting=

          > diaries. He listed everything he brought, from whom and how much. There=

          > were several entries about marbled paper purchases and commissions and
          > supplies. I wish I remember more clearly. Gail
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gail MacKenzie
          Jake, When I return to Philadelphia in February, I wouldn¹t mind at all going back and making notes on the various entries about marbled paper purchases and
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 8, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Jake, When I return to Philadelphia in February, I wouldn¹t mind at all
            going back and making notes on the various entries about marbled paper
            purchases and supplies. I went looking for information because I am also
            intrigued by the history of the marbled borders on the early continental
            currency notes. Regards, Gail


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.