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RE: [Marbling] Digest Number 796

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  • tomas viavant
    re maebling on canvas: i have been oil marbling fir several years, i marble both on paper and canvas. hiwever it has been a long time since i marbled on
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 28 6:25 PM
      re maebling on canvas: i have been oil marbling fir several years, i
      marble both on paper and canvas. hiwever it has been a long time since i
      marbled on canvas. for a long time i did not use any thickener in the
      water. just 20 nule tean boxax. 1/4 cup per gallon. first heat one quart
      water to boiling, stir in borax, add to water and let cool. my first
      painti ngs on canvas were done with commercial enemals. i wiuld skim from
      a can of enamel the oil floaring on top and then use that oil to thin the
      colors i used. i later was told by a chemist at a paint company that this
      oil is nostly soya resin. i mixed the light color enemals half resin and
      half enemal. tjhe enemals differed with each manufacturer. i found that
      the cheapest enemals worked the best. the more expensive ones have a lot
      of dryer in them and they dry on the water before i could nake a design.
      about five years ago (maybe seven) i started using printing inks to
      make my colors. ny best results were 1/3 printing ink, 1/3 soya alkyd resin
      60 percent,and 1/3 tung oil base fueniture stain.I raise the humidity in ny
      studio with A hunidifier. i now use a thicxkener besides the borax.
      quite often every thing or one thing goes wrong a nd i ha ve to start
      over from scratch. I dont know if any of this information will be of usae
      to anyone, but as i am now pushing 80, i may as well pass it on to any one
      interested in experimenting with oil marbling.
      should you wish to see some of my marbli ng take a look at
      www.oilonwater.co

      tomas d'aquin aquinastomas_@...


      >From: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
      >Reply-To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
      >To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [Marbling] Digest Number 796
      >Date: 28 Jul 2004 14:18:38 -0000
      >
      >
      >There are 7 messages in this issue.
      >
      >Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Marbling on Canvas
      > From: "enigmaticmatrix" <Weshabak@...>
      > 2. humidity and marbling
      > From: "del.mary.stubbs" <mdstubbs@...>
      > 3. Re: Marbling on Canvas
      > From: "Sonja Idema" <sdidema@...>
      > 4. Re: Marbling on Canvas
      > From: Gail MacKenzie <gailmackenzi@...>
      > 5. Re: humidity and marbling
      > From: "Guffey" <dguff@...>
      > 6. Nedim S�nmez
      > From: "hamburgerbuntpapier_de"
      ><hamburgerbuntpapier@...>
      > 7. Re: humidity and marbling
      > From: "hamburgerbuntpapier_de"
      ><hamburgerbuntpapier@...>
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 1
      > Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 18:22:58 -0000
      > From: "enigmaticmatrix" <Weshabak@...>
      >Subject: Marbling on Canvas
      >
      >I am totally addicted to marbling. I wish I had the knowledge to
      >answer all the questions about marbling to help others. But I don't.
      >People have been marbling for eons...
      >
      >As far as oil marbling goes, I tried it with the liquid oils also,
      >and got the oil slick on the water also. I tried thinning the tube
      >oils with mineral spirits, but they either made a big oil slick on
      >the water or turned into little "boogers" and sank. Anyhow, I did
      >give up because the fumes started to get to me.
      >
      >Which brings out my next point. Marbling with acrylic paints and
      >watercolors is NOT toxic(as far as I know). Everybody's body is
      >different, so I'm not saying that it's not possible for you to have a
      >reaction. The methyl cel and carrageenan are used in certain foods.
      >Acrylic paints are safe as long as you use caution while using them.
      >
      >The only thing I can tell you, especially if you have a lot of money
      >invested in this art-form (as I do) is to experiment.
      >
      >I have wanted to marble on canvas for years, and actually tried it
      >once about 10 years ago. That was my failure, I only tried it once.
      >So, guess what I did? After TEN YEARS!!!! I marbled a piece of canvas
      >yesterday. It didn't turn out the way I wanted it to, (it looked
      >terrible) but I'm going to try again.
      >
      >It came out kinda interesting, but not all that good. It had lots of
      >hesitation marks and air bubbles in it. When I rinsed it, the color
      >rinsed away in unattractive splotches and left intense areas, and
      >pale patches on the canvas.
      >
      >If anyone else tries marbling on canvas, let me know how it works for
      >you.
      >
      >I believe the main thing about the art of marbling is to not give up.
      >
      >Donna
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 2
      > Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 14:01:31 -0500
      > From: "del.mary.stubbs" <mdstubbs@...>
      >Subject: humidity and marbling
      >
      >Hi everyone -
      >
      >I have been curious about this for a long time.....
      >
      >I understand how dry air affects marbling, as it can actually dry the
      >paints
      >out while on the bath.
      >
      >However, what I have not been able to asses, is how high humidity affects
      >marbling. I use carageenan, and mostly Golden acrylics.
      >
      >Thanks! Mary Celine Thouin (Stubbs)
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 3
      > Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 13:08:14 -0600
      > From: "Sonja Idema" <sdidema@...>
      >Subject: Re: Marbling on Canvas
      >
      >I just taught a marbling class at a college at the beginning of this month
      >and the students and I experimented with a lot of different media to
      >marble. We tried heavy duty painter's canvas cut into pieces and that when
      >soaking it in alum, it gave off a putrid odor...somewhat like uric acid
      >(okay, like someone couldn't get to the bathroom in time!!)
      >We also found that when we marbled it, it did the same thing that you found
      >happen..."the color rinsed away in unattractive splotches and left intense
      >areas, and pale patches on the canvas".
      >We also marbled pieces in various thicknesses from that thick canvas to a
      >sheer fine quilter's cotton and 100% silk scarves.
      >We found that the thinner the material, the more defined and intense the
      >marbling was.
      >I'm not sure if that helps or not, but it sure showed us a thing or two!
      >Sonja (in Canada)
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: enigmaticmatrix
      > To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 12:22 PM
      > Subject: [Marbling] Marbling on Canvas
      >
      >
      > I am totally addicted to marbling. I wish I had the knowledge to
      > answer all the questions about marbling to help others. But I don't.
      > People have been marbling for eons...
      >
      > As far as oil marbling goes, I tried it with the liquid oils also,
      > and got the oil slick on the water also. I tried thinning the tube
      > oils with mineral spirits, but they either made a big oil slick on
      > the water or turned into little "boogers" and sank. Anyhow, I did
      > give up because the fumes started to get to me.
      >
      > Which brings out my next point. Marbling with acrylic paints and
      > watercolors is NOT toxic(as far as I know). Everybody's body is
      > different, so I'm not saying that it's not possible for you to have a
      > reaction. The methyl cel and carrageenan are used in certain foods.
      > Acrylic paints are safe as long as you use caution while using them.
      >
      > The only thing I can tell you, especially if you have a lot of money
      > invested in this art-form (as I do) is to experiment.
      >
      > I have wanted to marble on canvas for years, and actually tried it
      > once about 10 years ago. That was my failure, I only tried it once.
      > So, guess what I did? After TEN YEARS!!!! I marbled a piece of canvas
      > yesterday. It didn't turn out the way I wanted it to, (it looked
      > terrible) but I'm going to try again.
      >
      > It came out kinda interesting, but not all that good. It had lots of
      > hesitation marks and air bubbles in it. When I rinsed it, the color
      > rinsed away in unattractive splotches and left intense areas, and
      > pale patches on the canvas.
      >
      > If anyone else tries marbling on canvas, let me know how it works for
      > you.
      >
      > I believe the main thing about the art of marbling is to not give up.
      >
      > Donna
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 4
      > Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 12:24:05 -0700
      > From: Gail MacKenzie <gailmackenzi@...>
      >Subject: Re: Marbling on Canvas
      >
      > After years of working on fabric...and having more and more problems: I
      >have decided that fabrics are going through the same changes as paper has
      >been undergoing. Meaning that more and different finishes and fillers are
      >being used. So, Now I prewash everything. I presoak for 1-2 hours with
      >cold water in the washing machine with about 1 tablespoon of Simple Green
      >to
      >a tub full of cold water. Spin, refill and rinse, spin, refill and rinse
      >than line or machine dry depending on the fabric. I hope this is helpful
      >Best wishes, Gail
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 5
      > Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 14:51:36 -0700
      > From: "Guffey" <dguff@...>
      >Subject: Re: humidity and marbling
      >
      >Hi
      >
      >I don't know about anyone else, but I have my best results when the
      >humidity
      >is high, especially a cool rainy day. But then I have the advantage of
      >living in a very temperate climate where year round temperature is around
      >65
      >degrees (hottest official record of 86 degrees!) so I can't say how hot
      >weather and high humidity affect marbling. I use blender carraghean and
      >Liquitex acrylics with very fine results.
      >
      >D. Guffey
      >Eureka, CA
      >
      >
      >
      >----- Original Message -----
      >From: "del.mary.stubbs" <mdstubbs@...>
      >To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
      >Sent: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 12:01 PM
      >Subject: [Marbling] humidity and marbling
      >
      >
      > > Hi everyone -
      > >
      > > I have been curious about this for a long time.....
      > >
      > > I understand how dry air affects marbling, as it can actually dry the
      >paints
      > > out while on the bath.
      > >
      > > However, what I have not been able to asses, is how high humidity
      >affects
      > > marbling. I use carageenan, and mostly Golden acrylics.
      > >
      > > Thanks! Mary Celine Thouin (Stubbs)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 6
      > Date: Wed, 28 Jul 2004 08:17:10 -0000
      > From: "hamburgerbuntpapier_de" <hamburgerbuntpapier@...>
      >Subject: Nedim S�nmez
      >
      >Good news about Nedim - I have been told by a collector who contacted
      >Nedim he is not
      >obliged to sell his collection after all.
      >
      >Susanne Krause
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >Message: 7
      > Date: Wed, 28 Jul 2004 08:39:18 -0000
      > From: "hamburgerbuntpapier_de" <hamburgerbuntpapier@...>
      >Subject: Re: humidity and marbling
      >
      >Hi Dolores-
      >
      >Both humidity and temperatures give helping hands to chemical reactions,
      >sl=
      >owing or
      >quickening them.
      >I find the affects vary a lot with the patterns I make and the techniques
      >I=
      > use. Paste paper
      >making is at its best with humidity above 70% and temperature below 25�C
      >(p=
      >aste dries
      >slower and with less effects on the base paper), while sprinkling has its
      >h=
      >eyday below 50%
      >and 18�C (airborn paints don't meet up with millions of droplets on their
      >w=
      >ay down to the
      >sheet). My 'coldest' pattern is called 'Snowballs', I do it only on cold,
      >d=
      >ry, windless winter's
      >days with the window open; and a woolen sweater beneath the overalls. Last
      >=
      >summer was
      >exceptionally hot with temperatures round about 30�C and humidity below
      >50%=
      > for weeks.
      >I did not produce one single sheet during those weeks, the same applied to
      >=
      >my marbling
      >colleague.
      >
      >A marbler from Mexico told he has a humidifier going while he marbles.
      >
      >I've heard colleagues talking about having air conditioning installed, but
      >=
      >I am not sure
      >about the wiseness of the idea. Apart from the cost, air conditioning
      >tends=
      > to produce
      >drafts, and that's about the last thing one needs.
      >
      >Paper decorating is done in various techniques in many places world wide,
      >t=
      >herefore the
      >techniques seem to be adaptable to many climates. Provided the decorators
      >a=
      >re pigheaded
      >and patient.
      >
      >Susanne Krause
      >
      >--- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, "Guffey" <dguff@h...> wrote:
      > > Hi
      > >
      > > I don't know about anyone else, but I have my best results when the
      >humid=
      >ity
      > > is high, especially a cool rainy day. But then I have the advantage of
      > > living in a very temperate climate where year round temperature is
      >around=
      > 65
      > > degrees (hottest official record of 86 degrees!) so I can't say how hot
      > > weather and high humidity affect marbling. I use blender carraghean and
      > > Liquitex acrylics with very fine results.
      > >
      > > D. Guffey
      > > Eureka, CA
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "del.mary.stubbs" <mdstubbs@p...>
      > > To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 12:01 PM
      > > Subject: [Marbling] humidity and marbling
      > >
      > >
      > > > Hi everyone -
      > > >
      > > > I have been curious about this for a long time.....
      > > >
      > > > I understand how dry air affects marbling, as it can actually dry the
      > > paints
      > > > out while on the bath.
      > > >
      > > > However, what I have not been able to asses, is how high humidity
      >affec=
      >ts
      > > > marbling. I use carageenan, and mostly Golden acrylics.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks! Mary Celine Thouin (Stubbs)
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >

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