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Re: [Marbling] talk about yer tense surface...

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  • Laura Sims
    Hello Jan, I hope you are fairing well with paints and bath. It sounds like you ve begun your initiation process of research and development...variables
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 26, 2000
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      Hello Jan,

      I hope you are fairing well with paints and bath. It sounds like you've
      begun your initiation process of research and development...variables
      abound. Hopefully you'll get to take Iris's class. Some times Pro-Chem has
      weekend marbling classes.

      You had some questions about silk. Wash your silk first (gentle cycle or by
      hand) with a mild soap to remove any residue from the silk. Note: Do tests
      noils and sueded silks to see if the results are satisfactory before buying
      too much. Taffeta/Thai and douppionni silks may be too stiff. Satisfactory
      for me is if I am able to retain line quality and if the fabric lays evenly
      and prints evenly on the surface. Sometimes it is hard to remove fabric
      sizing that may repel the alum and paint.

      Alum the fabric. Marble it with an acrylic of your choice. Although most
      marblers involved with this community email seem to use carragheenan, I use
      methyl cellulose. The main benefit is that it lasts longer and the surface
      doesn't seem to contaminate as easily with the acrylics. Some acrylics work
      better on it than others. One source is Earth Guild (800-EARTH GU).

      If you are interested in coming to the southeast for an acrylics class I'll
      be teaching a week at John C. Campbell Folk School July 31 to
      Aug. 4 (800-Folk Sch) in Brasstown, NC
      or at Arrowmont in March or June of 2001 (865-436-5860) in Gatlinburg, TN.

      Enjoy the Magic,
      Laura


      >From: Jan Walker <jwalker@...>
      >Reply-To: Marbling@egroups.com
      >To: Marbling@egroups.com
      >Subject: [Marbling] talk about yer tense surface...
      >Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2000 13:00:36 -0400
      >
      >I was trying to adjust some size the other day to match my colors (I know,
      >it is supposed to go the other way around but hey).
      >
      >The size was too thick and I kept adding water. At least, I'm pretty sure
      >it was too thick. Somebody told me that if the size was too thin, it would
      >keep moving after you took out a patterning tool. When I pulled the color
      >into a pattern, it stubbornly flowed back towards where it had come from
      >(the opposite!) so I decided that it was thick. Water is the right thing
      >to add, rather than a surfactant or something else? (This was for marbling
      >with ProChem marbling paints, i.e. acrylics.)
      >
      >Which brings me to the question of the surface tensions. Do you have an
      >intuitive feel for which surface is "more tense" if that is the right
      >question? Or is it just that they are sort of the same surface tension (if
      >you could measure that) but incompatible due to the oil/water thing?
      >
      >I had used some colorless extender as a way of keeping more clear patches
      >open. when I put down color onto it, teeny drops of color leaped sideways
      >off the main drop onto places nearby. Once it even skittered around on the
      >surface before settling down. This is amazing to watch. Is this kind of
      >phenomenon common? If you saw that happening, would you automatically
      >think "Oops throw it all out" or "oops needs more <something>" ??
      >
      >Any thoughts? Trying to build up my intuitions without ever having seen a
      >pro do this. (Anyone giving a workshop in New England?)
      >
      >Thanks for sharing any experiences.
      >Jan Walker
      >Cambridge MA USA
      >
      >

      ________________________________________________________________________
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    • Laura Sims
      Hello Jan, I hope you are fairing well with paints and bath. It sounds like you ve begun your initiation process of research and development...variables
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 26, 2000
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        Hello Jan,

        I hope you are fairing well with paints and bath. It sounds like you've
        begun your initiation process of research and development...variables
        abound. Hopefully you'll get to take Iris's class. Some times Pro-Chem has
        weekend marbling classes.

        You had some questions about silk. Wash your silk first (gentle cycle or by
        hand) with a mild soap to remove any residue from the silk. Note: Do tests
        noils and sueded silks to see if the results are satisfactory before buying
        too much. Taffeta/Thai and douppionni silks may be too stiff. Satisfactory
        for me is if I am able to retain line quality and if the fabric lays evenly
        and prints evenly on the surface. Sometimes it is hard to remove fabric
        sizing that may repel the alum and paint.

        Alum the fabric. Marble it with an acrylic of your choice. Although most
        marblers involved with this community email seem to use carragheenan, I use
        methyl cellulose. The main benefit is that it lasts longer and the surface
        doesn't seem to contaminate as easily with the acrylics. Some acrylics work
        better on it than others. One source is Earth Guild (800-EARTH GU).

        If you are interested in coming to the southeast for an acrylics class I'll
        be teaching a week at John C. Campbell Folk School July 31 to
        Aug. 4 (800-Folk Sch) in Brasstown, NC
        or at Arrowmont in March or June of 2001 (865-436-5860) in Gatlinburg, TN.

        Enjoy the Magic,
        Laura


        >From: Jan Walker <jwalker@...>
        >Reply-To: Marbling@egroups.com
        >To: Marbling@egroups.com
        >Subject: [Marbling] talk about yer tense surface...
        >Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2000 13:00:36 -0400
        >
        >I was trying to adjust some size the other day to match my colors (I know,
        >it is supposed to go the other way around but hey).
        >
        >The size was too thick and I kept adding water. At least, I'm pretty sure
        >it was too thick. Somebody told me that if the size was too thin, it would
        >keep moving after you took out a patterning tool. When I pulled the color
        >into a pattern, it stubbornly flowed back towards where it had come from
        >(the opposite!) so I decided that it was thick. Water is the right thing
        >to add, rather than a surfactant or something else? (This was for marbling
        >with ProChem marbling paints, i.e. acrylics.)
        >
        >Which brings me to the question of the surface tensions. Do you have an
        >intuitive feel for which surface is "more tense" if that is the right
        >question? Or is it just that they are sort of the same surface tension (if
        >you could measure that) but incompatible due to the oil/water thing?
        >
        >I had used some colorless extender as a way of keeping more clear patches
        >open. when I put down color onto it, teeny drops of color leaped sideways
        >off the main drop onto places nearby. Once it even skittered around on the
        >surface before settling down. This is amazing to watch. Is this kind of
        >phenomenon common? If you saw that happening, would you automatically
        >think "Oops throw it all out" or "oops needs more <something>" ??
        >
        >Any thoughts? Trying to build up my intuitions without ever having seen a
        >pro do this. (Anyone giving a workshop in New England?)
        >
        >Thanks for sharing any experiences.
        >Jan Walker
        >Cambridge MA USA
        >
        >

        ________________________________________________________________________
        Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
      • J Dolphin
        Laura, do you teach this course every summer? Or more than once a year? Thanks Jill
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 26, 2000
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          Laura, do you teach this course every summer? Or more than once a year?
          Thanks
          Jill
          >If you are interested in coming to the southeast for an acrylics class I'll
          >be teaching a week at John C. Campbell Folk School July 31 to
          >Aug. 4 (800-Folk Sch) in Brasstown, NC
          >or at Arrowmont in March or June of 2001 (865-436-5860) in Gatlinburg, TN.
          >
          >Enjoy the Magic,
          >Laura
        • Laura Sims
          Jill, I apologize for taking so long to reply. I ve been marbling madly to get ready for a show. I will be at the Folk School in 2001 May 4-6 and July 29-
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 13, 2000
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            Jill,

            I apologize for taking so long to reply. I've been marbling madly to get
            ready for a show. I will be at the Folk School in 2001 May 4-6 and July 29-
            August 4... 1-800-FOLK SCH

            Best, Laura


            >From: "J Dolphin" <jdolphin@...>
            >Reply-To: Marbling@egroups.com
            >To: <Marbling@egroups.com>
            >Subject: Re: [Marbling] talk about yer tense surface...
            >Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 16:30:33 -0400
            >
            >Laura, do you teach this course every summer? Or more than once a year?
            >Thanks
            >Jill
            > >If you are interested in coming to the southeast for an acrylics class
            >I'll
            > >be teaching a week at John C. Campbell Folk School July 31 to
            > >Aug. 4 (800-Folk Sch) in Brasstown, NC
            > >or at Arrowmont in March or June of 2001 (865-436-5860) in Gatlinburg,
            >TN.
            > >
            > >Enjoy the Magic,
            > >Laura
            >
            >

            ________________________________________________________________________
            Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
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