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The oldest datable suminagashi, and other links

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  • Jake Benson
    Hello everyone, I ve been wanting to share a few links with everyone. This is taken from a list of links that I ve compiled for the Society of Marbling site
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 9, 2004
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      Hello everyone,

      I've been wanting to share a few links with everyone. This is taken
      from a list of links that I've compiled for the Society of Marbling
      site (these will be presented in the near future), but couldn't wait to
      share these as they are intrinsic to marbling history.

      The Visual Media Center, under the auspices of the Department of Art
      History and Archaeology at Columbia University features various art
      images in a visual database. They have mounted images from a Japanese
      manuscript entitled 三十六人集 Sanjurokunin Kashu, or 36 Eminent Poets. It
      dates to 1112 CE, which is during the Heian period, and contains
      examples of what are called waka or tanka, a poem of exactly 31
      syllables. This valuable manuscript is kept at the 西本願寺 Nishi Honganji
      temple in Kyoto . Numbers 5, 6, and 7 are from this manuscript, and
      feature several styles of decorative papers. Number 6 features one of
      the oldest datable example of suminagashi marbling. It is the oldest
      known example of marbling in any form, in any country, at this time.
      The information relating to these pages are also the most detailed
      descriptions of these pieces I have read to date. It actually mentions
      WHO THE POETS WERE for the first time in English. Of course, more work
      must be done to be able to accurately understand the entire manuscript,
      and the context in which is was created. Click underneath the image to
      view larger images. The largest images have fairly decent resolution.

      Other examples from this manuscript can be seen in Anne Chambers book
      Suminagashi, Thames and Hudson, 1992. There are some detail shots in
      that book.

      http://www.mcah.columbia.edu/cgi-bin/dbcourses/item?skip=30100

      and a detail

      www.mcah.columbia.edu/dbcourses/delbanco/large/AH_0304_216_20.jpg

      The next site is a commercial press photography site, but happens to
      feature a photograph that is important in relation to the manuscript
      mentioned above. Click on the bottom “next” button, 6 times. It is a
      photograph of the revival of a traditional ceremony for the reciting of
      waka poems at the 西本願寺 Nishi Honganji temple in Kyoto. It is an
      interesting demonstration of the ceremony in which these poems were
      traditionally recited. And shows how books like the sanjurokunin kashu
      were meant to be used. The caption says that this ceremony at the
      temple after a 100 year lapse.

      www.nni.nikkei.co.jp/FR/INFOCUS/infocus_04_01_2.html

      The Kyoto National Museum Site features a suminagashi sample book,
      referred to in Japanese as Suminagashizomekirehonchô. Click on the
      thumbnail images at the top of the screen to view two very interesting
      historic examples.

      http://www3.kyohaku.go.jp/knm/eng/
      detail.php?menu=00&page=1&no=0000005845&recno=1&hit=1

      Enjoy!


      Jake Benson



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