Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

talk about yer tense surface...

Expand Messages
  • Jan Walker
    I was trying to adjust some size the other day to match my colors (I know, it is supposed to go the other way around but hey). The size was too thick and I
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 14, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      I was trying to adjust some size the other day to match my colors (I know,
      it is supposed to go the other way around but hey).

      The size was too thick and I kept adding water. At least, I'm pretty sure
      it was too thick. Somebody told me that if the size was too thin, it would
      keep moving after you took out a patterning tool. When I pulled the color
      into a pattern, it stubbornly flowed back towards where it had come from
      (the opposite!) so I decided that it was thick. Water is the right thing
      to add, rather than a surfactant or something else? (This was for marbling
      with ProChem marbling paints, i.e. acrylics.)

      Which brings me to the question of the surface tensions. Do you have an
      intuitive feel for which surface is "more tense" if that is the right
      question? Or is it just that they are sort of the same surface tension (if
      you could measure that) but incompatible due to the oil/water thing?

      I had used some colorless extender as a way of keeping more clear patches
      open. when I put down color onto it, teeny drops of color leaped sideways
      off the main drop onto places nearby. Once it even skittered around on the
      surface before settling down. This is amazing to watch. Is this kind of
      phenomenon common? If you saw that happening, would you automatically
      think "Oops throw it all out" or "oops needs more <something>" ??

      Any thoughts? Trying to build up my intuitions without ever having seen a
      pro do this. (Anyone giving a workshop in New England?)

      Thanks for sharing any experiences.
      Jan Walker
      Cambridge MA USA
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.