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creolin

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  • Jake Benson
    Garret s outline of Hauptmann s method is most excellent, but I would like = to add my 2 cents:Creolin is brand-name for a disinifectant made from coal tar
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 25, 2004
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      Garret's outline of Hauptmann's method is most excellent, but I would like =
      to add my
      2 cents:

      Creolin is brand-name for a disinifectant made from coal tar extract, not p=
      henol.
      However, the product sold today in my mind is nothing like what used to be =
      obtained.
      I think it has a lot more soap and a lot less coal tar. it still stinks to=
      high heaven, but
      is WAY too powerful a dispersant to add to marbling colors.

      Other countries still widely employ coal tar as a disnifectant. In Egypt a=
      nd Turkey I
      saw it used in lavatories, and it was often thick, black, and very foul (th=
      ough now
      people can afford less smelly stuff to use at home, it is still often used =
      in public
      areas)! I wondered if such products may be used in Mexico, and perhaps ava=
      ilable at
      Los tiendas hispanos (spanish grocers) here in the US. I have seen Coal Ta=
      r USP
      offered, but haven't had time to experiment.

      As far as toxicity is concerned, ALL of these recipes are hazardous in one =
      way or
      another. Hauptmann's recipe is highly caustic and should be handled with e=
      xtreme
      caution. Potash in particular is exothermic when made into solution. Coal=
      tar is a
      proven carcinogen. I recommend that use use chemical protection such as gl=
      oves,
      goggles, and a mask or respirator when handling such materials. Please con=
      sult
      Monoa Rossol's excellent book on hazards to the artist about what you shoud=
      l be
      concerned about.


      Finally , I would like to mention something that I have observed over the y=
      ears, and
      that is most older examples of tiger eye or sun-spot patterns that I have s=
      een seem
      to be very aggressive towards the paper. I have seen the spots burning thr=
      ough the
      back side of the sheet. Since most of the recipes contain some form of cau=
      stic, I may
      be that an excessively high a ph that is the problem. Of course it could =
      also be due
      to other factors, or a synergistic result of a harsh solution on a poor qua=
      lity paper. It
      could also result from other additives opr residues to the color- perhaps a=
      n oil in the
      creolin or coal -tar....

      Anyone else observed this?

      Someone should translate the very thorough essays written by Paul Adam abou=
      t this
      pattern in the Archiv für Buchenbinderei (around 1915-1920- my copy is sti=
      ll packed
      away after moving) . He examined many methods and shows the effects of eac=
      h
      chemical in solution. An abridged version of this was published in a small=
      pamphlet
      entitled Die marmorienkunst (off the top of my head) that he wrote on marbl=
      ing in
      1928, but the longer article is in the Archiv...

      Regards,

      Jake Benson

      ps:

      I've moved, new address, and email below

      Bensons Hand Bindery
      1027 brookwood circle
      West Columbia, SC 29169
      (803) 926-5544
      handbindery@...
    • irisnevins
      Hi Jake.... I used creosote at one time for a decent if not perfect sunspot, it stained the back of the paper. It had to be 20 years ago and they are still OK,
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 25, 2004
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        Hi Jake....

        I used creosote at one time for a decent if not perfect sunspot, it stained
        the back of the paper. It had to be 20 years ago and they are still OK,
        except for the stain, which is grease like.

        I use garden potash now, it's 60% potash and looks like 40% dirt! But it
        makes a real nice sunspot, a little differnt from the hauptman recipe, but
        in ways I like it better.....so the tradition evolves a bit, eh? Garret
        Dixon sells the regular potash.....but yes, it's caustic, I used some
        yesterday, it got in a paper cut, I thought I'd hit the roof. My garden
        potash, I barely feel anything from it.

        Iris Nevins
        www.marblingpaper.com
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