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Discussion on alum

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  • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
    Now this is exciting - is it really the oil paint that soakes through the paper? Is it not rather the oil soaking through, and the oily smudge looks like
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 9, 2003
      Now this is exciting - is it really the oil paint that soakes through
      the paper? Is it not rather the oil soaking through, and the oily
      smudge looks like paint? Pigments are not soluble, they adhere to the
      surface of whatever they are painted on, so: how can they soak through?
      Paper in not like a sieve, isn't it? I'd like to know about that,
      please. Has your teacher given you more information?

      Susanne Krause
    • Dolores Guffey
      In looking at my older sheets of oil marbling, I do note that it is an oily residue which flows to the back of the paper. Depending upon the type of paper
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 9, 2003
        In looking at my older sheets of oil marbling, I do note that it is an oily residue which flows to the back of the paper. Depending upon the type of paper used, some is much more noticeable than others. The oil paints totally attach to the surface of the paper, so no alum is needed. It is a much messier form of marbling, especially the diluting of the oil paints with paint thinner, and the clean up is more difficult.

        It is my understanding that when using acrylics (and also watercolors) there is a chemical bonding which takes between the alum solution on the paper and the pigments in the paints and this is what keeps the colors from washing off when you rinse the paper.

        D. Guffey

        -----Original Message-----
        From: hamburgerbuntpapier_de [mailto:hamburgerbuntpapier@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2003 11:52 AM
        To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Marbling] Discussion on alum


        Now this is exciting - is it really the oil paint that soakes through
        the paper? Is it not rather the oil soaking through, and the oily
        smudge looks like paint? Pigments are not soluble, they adhere to the
        surface of whatever they are painted on, so: how can they soak through?
        Paper in not like a sieve, isn't it? I'd like to know about that,
        please. Has your teacher given you more information?

        Susanne Krause






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      • James M Mahoney
        Yes, it really is the oil paint that soaks through the paper. I painted in oils for many years before moving into watercolor and acrylics. Oil paint is
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 9, 2003
          Yes, it really is the oil paint that soaks through the paper. I painted
          in oils for many years before moving into watercolor and acrylics. Oil
          paint is pigment color that is dissolved in an oil base, therefore when
          the oil soaks through the paper it is both the oil and the pigment that
          has combined - you will see both the oil and the color of the pigment
          (because they are now one substance) on the paper, whether it is front or
          back.
          Monita
          On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 19:52:14 -0000 "hamburgerbuntpapier_de"
          <hamburgerbuntpapier@...> writes:
          > Now this is exciting - is it really the oil paint that soakes through
          >
          > the paper? Is it not rather the oil soaking through, and the oily
          > smudge looks like paint? Pigments are not soluble, they adhere to
          > the
          > surface of whatever they are painted on, so: how can they soak
          > through?
          > Paper in not like a sieve, isn't it? I'd like to know about that,
          > please. Has your teacher given you more information?
          >
          > Susanne Krause
          >
          >
          >
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