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Re: [Marbling] Digest Number 682

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  • Linda AA Hall
    I am a fabric marbler and needed to ask your expert advice. I purchased some pickling alum from a Mennonite grocery store and I was wondering if there is any
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 29, 2003
      I am a fabric marbler and needed to ask your expert advice. I purchased
      some pickling alum from a Mennonite grocery store and I was wondering if
      there is any difference between presoaking fabric for marbling with that
      or with the alum I purchased from the dyehouse. My college age son
      helped me do some chemistry experiments to see if both alums were the
      same or different. We couldn't remember what to do after we got started
      (his chemistry class was 3 years ago) so we tried several things. First
      we burned both and they both bubbled. Then we put spoonfuls for each
      alum into 2 separate containers of bleach, vinegar, ammonia, water,
      alcohol. I think it was the alcohol that made the pickling alum rubbery.
      Anyway, at the end of the experiments we decided that we have no idea if
      they are the same or different in chemical composition. My last marbling
      session seemed washed out with color not being what it should be but then
      I was using several months old methyl cel. I use 20 gallons of methyl
      cel and don't marble all the time as I am a quilter, teacher, etc. so I
      usually marble all at once and then not for awhile. Is pickling alum the
      same and therefore interchangeable with marbling alum? The cost and
      shipping makes the pickling alum more affordable.

      Thanks,

      Linda Hall
    • J Dolphin
      WOW! Another Great question on properties. I certainly hope the fabric folk can help out here! Jill ... From: Linda AA Hall To:
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 29, 2003
        WOW! Another Great question on properties. I certainly hope the fabric folk
        can help out here!
        Jill
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Linda AA Hall" <Lindah40@...>
        To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, November 29, 2003 7:36 PM
        Subject: Re: [Marbling] Digest Number 682


        > I am a fabric marbler and needed to ask your expert advice. I purchased
        > some pickling
      • G. Dixon
        Pickling alum is Potassium aluminum sulfate. It can be used, at least for paper which is what I have used it for. Aluminum sulfate is the traditional mordant
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 30, 2003
          Pickling alum is Potassium aluminum sulfate. It can be used, at least for paper which is what I have used it for. Aluminum sulfate is the traditional mordant for dyers, and I think is also better for paper marbling.
          Garrett Dixon----- Original Message -----
          From: J Dolphin
          To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, November 29, 2003 8:59 PM
          Subject: Re: [Marbling] Digest Number 682


          WOW! Another Great question on properties. I certainly hope the fabric folk
          can help out here!
          Jill
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Linda AA Hall" <Lindah40@...>
          To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, November 29, 2003 7:36 PM
          Subject: Re: [Marbling] Digest Number 682


          > I am a fabric marbler and needed to ask your expert advice. I purchased
          > some pickling



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        • Gail MacKenzie
          ... Just off the very top of my head, and at the end of my days traveling....I¹d say they are probably the same. The pickling alum would be food grade and
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 1, 2003
            > I am a fabric marbler and needed to ask your expert advice. I purchased
            > some pickling alum from a Mennonite grocery store and I was wondering if
            > there is any difference between presoaking fabric for marbling with that
            > or with the alum I purchased from the dyehouse. My college age son
            > helped me do some chemistry experiments to see if both alums were the
            > same or different. We couldn't remember what to do after we got started
            > (his chemistry class was 3 years ago) so we tried several things. First
            > we burned both and they both bubbled. Then we put spoonfuls for each
            > alum into 2 separate containers of bleach, vinegar, ammonia, water,
            > alcohol. I think it was the alcohol that made the pickling alum rubbery.
            > Anyway, at the end of the experiments we decided that we have no idea if
            > they are the same or different in chemical composition. My last marbling
            > session seemed washed out with color not being what it should be but then
            > I was using several months old methyl cel. I use 20 gallons of methyl
            > cel and don't marble all the time as I am a quilter, teacher, etc. so I
            > usually marble all at once and then not for awhile. Is pickling alum the
            > same and therefore interchangeable with marbling alum? The cost and
            > shipping makes the pickling alum more affordable.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Linda Hall
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            >
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            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
            > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .

            Just off the very top of my head, and at the end of my days traveling....I¹d
            say they are probably the same. The pickling alum would be food grade and
            ³cleaner² AlSO4 is what you want and there are many levels of
            purity....which makes no difference for alumming for marbling because the
            impurities are insoluble. Happy post Thanksgiving!!


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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