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[Marbling] "aluming" paper; indigo

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  • irisnevins
    Overall, I found indigo, though it stayed on for me to be very rubby when dry, requiring a fixative. I only make paints now from pigments that leave minimal
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 16, 2003
      Overall, I found indigo, though it stayed on for me to be very "rubby" when
      dry, requiring a fixative. I only make paints now from pigments that leave
      minimal if any rub. Bookbinders will hate you for this! Indigo always
      offset onto the opposing sheet, got all over their hands and smeared.

      As for alum.....I was never taught to marble so did it my own way. I hated
      stopping to alum when I wanted to marble, so I tried aluming ahead....days
      ahead. The trick is they must be totally dry before stacking, I mean the
      room they are stored in must bee at least under 55% humidity....preferably
      50% or less. I have stored them for years and they still work. I find they
      work better than damp papers for me.

      With the current buffer problem, my Classic Linen works better dry than
      freshly alumed. I am blasting the theory here on alum needing to be freshly
      done and damp....have been doing it this way for nearly 26 years. The
      secret is keeping the paper dry. I run a dehumidifier all summer. Winter,
      no problemo.

      I wonder......if both sides of the paper are equally
      buffered.....ah....another experiment for next week. And I will try to wash
      some down first. Maybe a bucket and separate sponge with plain water
      first.....or wet and squeegee off. However, since I alum sometime 250
      sheets in a session I may just lose my mind over this.
      Iris Nevins
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