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RE: [Marbling] re: covering up sections

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  • irisnevins
    Oh....I never do either...the sequencing or taking notes. Absolutely find notes the most useless and confusing things in marbling....I mean you do the same
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 23, 2003
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      Oh....I never do either...the sequencing or taking notes. Absolutely find
      notes the most useless and confusing things in marbling....I mean you do
      the same exact thing again another day and it's totally different.

      I just wing it....it may take a few tries in the beginning to get it right
      for that particular marbling day, but then I just go with it. Some days my
      red wants to go before blue, or vice versa,,,,just to get the same result
      as before. Notes just made my life difficult, I tossed them after my first
      year.

      Iris Nevins




      <<<<<<<<Let me try to explain better:
      The purpose was so that you didn't have to write down the colors or the
      sequence of your throws. Lets presume you are making a bouquet pattern,
      and using a 10" X 20" tray. First you throw your colors, whether it be
      2 colors or 20. Then you put a piece of stiff paper which hovers over
      the carraghean surface over a 4" of the width of the tray . Note that
      it is not making contact with the thrown colors. Then you proceed to
      rake and comb one direction, but after each direction, you continue to
      move the hovering paper over another 4". When you are done you remove
      the hovering paper, and make a contact print which documents the
      sequence of your colors and the sequence of your raking and combing
      patterns all the way to the final design. I hope this is clearer. I
      either read this in Ink and Gall, or from the SF gathering.

      Thanks Iris for sharing your experience about making editioned papers.
      Yes, by that I mean making a zillion papers that all look the same.

      Here is a small, but helpful hint on drying papers. I use to drape my
      papers exactly in half over a pvc pipe to dry, but I found that there
      was always a wet bead at the bottom of the paper, which took much longer
      to dry. To expedite the drying procedure I now hang my papers over the
      pvc pipe but slightly off kilter, so that the bottom of the edge of the
      paper points at about 10 degrees down hill. Now the water runs downhill
      and the papers dry much faster. Gosh it only took me a decade to figure
      that one out.

      Carol Scott>>>>>>
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