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  • Jake Benson
    Hello Everyone, Dr. Annemarie Schimmel has passed away. She was a world-famous Islamic scholar, writing about the Persian poetry of Mevlana Jelaluddin Rumi,
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 6, 2003
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      Hello Everyone,

      Dr. Annemarie Schimmel has passed away. She was a world-famous Islamic
      scholar, writing about the Persian poetry of Mevlana Jelaluddin Rumi, the
      role of women in Islam, and the meaning of calligraphy and symbolic imagery
      in Muslim poetry to a Western audience. She also touched on the subject of
      ebru (she used the term abri, which she translated to mean ³clouded²) in her
      publications. In 1986 she gave a lecture on Sufism and Marbling at the
      Harvard marbling symposium, which was largely consisted of her (unpublished)
      translation of the ³Ebruname² written by the late master Mustafa Düzgünman
      (unfortunatley, this lecture was not recorded, and I don¹t think she
      publicly lectured on the topic again- if someone knows that she did, PLEASE
      let me know). She also identified Indo-Persian poems that made passing
      reference to marbling. She published this information in 2 of her books,
      ³Calligraphy and Islamic Culture², and ³A Two-Colored Brocade: Imagery in
      Persian Poetry². She also wrote an introduction for Hikmet Barutçugil¹s
      book ³Ebru: The Dream of Water².

      Here¹s the link to the obituary from the Boston Globe,

      http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/034/obituaries/Annemarie_Schimmel_sought_t
      o_bridge_Islam_gap+.shtml


      Annemarie Schimmel; sought to bridge Islam gap


      By Scott S. Greenberger, Globe Staff, 2/3/2003

      Annemarie Schimmel's classes on Indo-Muslim culture transfixed Harvard
      students for a quarter-century, and no wonder: She often lectured with her
      eyes closed, reciting long passages of mystical Urdu or Persian poetry from
      memory -- along with the accession and death dates of every king she
      mentioned.


      Dr. Schimmel, who started Harvard's studies on Indo-Muslim culture and was
      one of the world's most influential scholars of Islam, died Jan. 26 in Bonn.
      She was 80.

      ''She was just a remarkable scholar. You rarely meet such a person in the
      academic world, a person of such tremendous heart and spiritual insight as
      well as such vast learning,'' Diana Eck, a professor of comparative religion
      at Harvard, said yesterday. ''This is the very reason she was known and
      admired throughout the world.''

      Dr. Schimmel, who was born in Erfurt, Germany, in 1922, was fascinated by
      Islamic history and culture from childhood. She began studying Arabic when
      she was 15; within four years, she had earned a doctorate in Islamic
      languages and civilization from the University of Berlin.

      She received a second doctorate at the University of Marburg five years
      later and became a professor of Arabic and Islamic studies at the University
      of Bonn. She also taught -- in Turkish -- at the University of Ankara.

      Dr. Schimmel came to Harvard in 1967, becoming the university's first
      professor of Indo-Muslim culture in 1970. Her primary focus during her 25
      years at Harvard was Sufism, or Islamic mysticism. Even prominent Sufis
      praised her as one of the world's preeminent experts on their tradition and
      history. She left the university to return to Germany in 1992.

      The author of more than 50 books and hundreds of articles and lectures, Dr.
      Schimmel won the prestigious Peace Prize of the German Book Trade in 1995.
      The citation for that award hailed her search for ''a synthesis of Islam and
      the modern'' -- but the choice was not without controversy. About 200 German
      intellectuals protested the award, accusing Dr. Schimmel of supporting the
      death sentence the Iranian government ordered against British author Salman
      Rushdie.

      Dr. Schimmel denied the charge, saying that she merely expressed
      understanding about how some Muslims might have been upset by Rushdie's
      portrayal of Islam in ''The Satanic Verses.''

      At her acceptance speech, Dr. Schimmel said she rejected ''the sinister holy
      war against Rushdie, but also simplistic Western preconceptions that equate
      Islam with intolerance.''

      The prize would be both a crowning achievement and a painful episode in her
      career. ''It seems to me my life's work, which was devoted to an
      understanding between East and West, has been destroyed,'' she said as
      protests mounted.

      Dr. Schimmel later denounced Islamic extremists, saying terrorists and some
      fundamentalists ''utilize Islam more or less as a catchword and have very
      little in common with its religious foundations.''. ''At least I have not
      discovered in the Koran or in the Traditions anything that orders or allows
      terrorism or the taking of hostages,'' she said. ''On the contrary, the
      Golden Rule is valid everywhere in the world of Islam.''

      Harvard will hold a memorial service for Dr. Schimmel, but details have not
      been completed.

      This story ran on page C12 of the Boston Globe on 2/3/2003.
      © Copyright 2003 Globe Newspaper Company.



      Jake Benson


      Benson's Hand Bindery
      Fine Custom Bookbinding & Conservation
      Hand Marbled Papers
      1319 B Summerville Ave.
      Columbia S.C. 29201
      Phone: 803.799.1853
      jemiljan@...






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    • mpmh60201 <milena@interaccess.com>
      So sorry to hear of this passing. She was a great scholar and friend of Ebru/Abri marbling. Haven t heard of another lecture by her on the subject either.
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 7, 2003
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        So sorry to hear of this passing.
        She was a great scholar and friend of Ebru/Abri marbling.
        Haven't heard of another lecture by her on the subject either.
      • Jake Benson
        Greetings everyone, I just learned today that Mr. Sarvan Digamber, a marbler in Jaipur working in the traditional Indian manner passed away three months ago.
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 9, 2005
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          Greetings everyone,

          I just learned today that Mr. Sarvan Digamber, a marbler in Jaipur
          working in the traditional Indian manner passed away three months ago.
          It is not clear to me if his sons have continued with his work. Mr.
          Digamber was featured in Alexandra Soteriou's beautiful book Gift of
          the Conquerors. The methods he used were very much a continuation of
          the Indian Abri traditions. He employed fenugreek for his size,
          mordanted handmade papers with alum prior to marbling, and made all of
          his colors from pigment. All of these methods are described in the
          18th century manuscript Persian manuscript Khulusat al Mujarrbat
          (Quintessence of Perscriptions). He also made rudimentary combs using
          thorns from the acacia tree. While we not just his work to be of the
          high standards that some profess today, nevertheless, his work was a
          very authentic, ad fully preserved a historical marbling tradition in
          the region.

          Jake Benson
          Benson's Hand Bindery
          Fine Custom Bookbinding, Conservation, & Hand Marbled Papers
          Jake Benson, Proprietor
          1027 Brookwood Circle
          West Columbia, SC 29169
          (803) 926-5544
          handbindery@...

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