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RE: [Marbling] handmade papers for mabling

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  • Franklyn Smith
    Hi Tom, Are you including Japanese papers many of which are hand made and marble well, some with and some without alum? I agree with the information from Iris
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 20, 2002
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      Hi Tom,

      Are you including Japanese papers many of which are hand made and marble
      well, some with and some without alum?

      I agree with the information from Iris Nevins and Dedree Drees, but
      would just like to add that the effectiveness of the paper is much
      affected by the type of beating and the fibre content. Soft,
      under-beaten paper, and paper made from linters seem more likely to
      produce the fuzzy effect that Iris Nevins mentions. I have used my own
      handmade paper which had been heavily beaten or have a small percentage
      of flax fibre and both seem to be more receptive to marbling with sharp,
      clear lines. Tim Barrett's papers marble well but are expensive so I
      only use them for cover papers. I am sure that you could get information
      from Tim.

      I am sure that you know that Hand Papermaking did a portfolio of
      decorated paper on handmade paper some years ago. I vaguely recall that
      some of these were marbled.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: leech541@... [mailto:leech541@...]
      Sent: December 19, 2002 6:00 AM
      To: Marbling@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Marbling] handmade papers for mabling

      Hello Marblers,

      I've agreed to write an article for Hand Papermaking Magazine about
      marbling,
      and i would like to get a sense of what other marblers think about
      marbling
      on handmade papers. Any particular successes, failures, joys or
      frustrations?
      Technical problems? Too expensive? Too scary? I know of only a few of
      you
      (hello Marjorie Tomchuk) who do it regularly, as part of their work.
      Others -
      Susan Martin and Dana and Ingrid at Moth Marblers from time to time. I
      know
      many of you have experimented, and would love to hear your thoughts.

      Wishing you a happy holiday season, and Peace

      tom Leech



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    • mpmh60201 <milena@interaccess.com>
      I agree with the previous message about hm papers. However, I ve also had exceptional results with very cheap hm papers from India and Tibet. The type of
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 21, 2002
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        I agree with the previous message about hm papers.
        However, I've also had exceptional results with very cheap hm papers
        from India and Tibet. The type of pigment and marbling size must be
        taken into consideration. Concentrated acrylics on carragheenan made
        with distilled water work the best for me on both purchased hm's and
        those which I have (poorly) made.
        Supreme results are guaranteed on the expensive hm's from Japan.
        Also- consider the level of expertise of the person doing the
        marbling. Hm paper variables can compound problems for a novice.
      • athena_2547 <athena_2547@yahoo.com>
        Although I am fairly new to the practice of marbling and only have a few months accumulated experience to speak of, my mother has been marbling on her own hand
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 27, 2002
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          Although I am fairly new to the practice of marbling and only have a
          few
          months accumulated experience to speak of, my mother has been
          marbling
          on her own hand made paper for at least 4 years now with success. Her
          lines
          are crisp and her colors turn out bold. I think that by using her own
          paper
          (usually abaca with some koozo fibers) she is able to give her work a
          more
          organic feel. In my experience of late i have found that kozo papers
          work
          wonderfully and yes the light brown of the paper effects some of the
          colors,
          but they blend, and since i make verry thin papers which are semi
          transparent
          it gives it this wonderful stained glass quality and works well when
          applied
          with methyl cellulouse to other handmades of different color and
          fiber. It
          seems that the key thing in marbling on handmades is knowing what
          kind of
          size was added to the pulp (if any) when the sheet was pulled. I have
          been
          using formation aid with the kozo, aluming the paper, and marbling
          with water
          based color on carageen. I will continue to experiment with different
          papers
          and marbling, as this is my area of interest, so if anyone knows of
          any
          reasources on the topic please let me know
          ~Melinda

          --- In Marbling@yahoogroups.com, leech541@a... wrote:
          > Hello Marblers,
          >
          > I've agreed to write an article for Hand Papermaking Magazine about
          marbling,
          > and i would like to get a sense of what other marblers think about
          marbling
          > on handmade papers. Any particular successes, failures, joys or
          frustrations?
          > Technical problems? Too expensive? Too scary? I know of only a few
          of
          you
          > (hello Marjorie Tomchuk) who do it regularly, as part of their
          work. Others -
          > Susan Martin and Dana and Ingrid at Moth Marblers from time to
          time. I
          know
          > many of you have experimented, and would love to hear your thoughts.
          >
          > Wishing you a happy holiday season, and Peace
          >
          > tom Leech
        • James M Mahoney
          Hi, Tom - I am an artist and was a papermaker first, and actually started marbling because I thought it would be wonderful on my own paper. And I continue to
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 27, 2002
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            Hi, Tom -

            I am an artist and was a papermaker first, and actually started marbling
            because I thought it would be wonderful on my own paper. And I continue
            to enjoy marbling on my handmade paper. I use Golden Fluid acrylics and
            methyl cel. I do find the marbling looks different on different
            "compositions" of paper. I do not, with exceptions, use any sizing - my
            papers are usually waterleaf papers. This does make the process
            different in that I cannot leave the paper on the marbling surface for
            any length of time, and I cannot work with really large pieces of paper.
            I do not like the effect I get marbling on papers that contain other
            materials (flower petals, onion skins, natural fibers added, etc.) as I
            feel it confuses the eye and detracts from both the look of the paper and
            the look of the marbling. Most of the paper I make is all cotton, but I
            also make linen paper. I do find clear and precise patterns on both
            (when I do traditional patterns) but the linen has a beautiful crispness
            to it, both in the hand of the paper and in the look of the patterns
            (most often, I do the experimental or art marbling rather than patterns).
            I do love the linen papers! I use specific colors (from Twinrocker)
            when coloring my papers, and I much prefer to marble on the colored
            papers than on white (to me it gives an added depth to the colors). My
            linen papers are always a delicate color - never white, as I purchase the
            linen fibers, cut them up and make the pulp from those.

            If you have any particular questions, I will be happy to respond with
            whatever knowledge I have.

            By the way, I saw your exhibit at the Museum of Papermaking in Atlanta -
            your work was wonderful and I enjoyed it very much. The additional
            exhibit of old marbled papers was so very interesting. I wonder if you
            remember the piece against the back wall (behind the staircase) in which
            the marbling was broken up into very angular and "square" shapes. Can
            you tell me how that was accomplished? I've never seen a piece anything
            like that one and I'm very curious. And thanks for the demonstrations
            you gave at the Gathering - I have enjoyed working with some of the ideas
            you gave me! (and some are still rumbling around in my head waiting to
            work their way out!)

            Monita Mahoney


            On Thu, 19 Dec 2002 06:00:16 EST leech541@... writes:
            > Hello Marblers,
            >
            > I've agreed to write an article for Hand Papermaking Magazine about
            > marbling,
            > and i would like to get a sense of what other marblers think about
            > marbling
            > on handmade papers. Any particular successes, failures, joys or
            > frustrations?
            > Technical problems? Too expensive? Too scary? I know of only a few
            > of you
            > (hello Marjorie Tomchuk) who do it regularly, as part of their work.
            > Others -
            > Susan Martin and Dana and Ingrid at Moth Marblers from time to time.
            > I know
            > many of you have experimented, and would love to hear your
            > thoughts.
            >
            > Wishing you a happy holiday season, and Peace
            >
            > tom Leech
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • sixshort <sixshort@yahoo.com.au>
            Hi Tom, I too began with papermaking, and then fell headlong into the ocean of marbling, from which I have not yet quite surfaced. I found that my own handmade
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 28, 2002
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              Hi Tom, I too began with papermaking, and then fell headlong into the
              ocean of marbling, from which I have not yet quite surfaced. I found
              that my own handmade paper, made from cotton linter or recycled
              paper,marbled well using watercolour paints or gouaches on un-alumed
              papers. I liked the silky texture of these papers, but the colours
              were rather faded, no doubt due to the absence of alum.
              Purchased "handmade" papers from India, made from recycled T-shirts,
              and other machine "handmade" papers were another kettle of fish. No
              matter what preparation I tried, the paints peeled off the papers as
              they were lifted from the size - what I referred to as "bubbles" in
              previous correspondence. I have not yet tried Jake Benson's
              suggestion to re-hydrate the papers overnight between damp sheets of
              blotting paper, with weights on top, then to alum and marble the
              papers. I too will be very interested to hear of others' success or
              failure in marbling handmade papers. Joan Ajala
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