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RE : [Marbling] Marbling in Switzerland - thank you Jake!

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  • MARLENE
    Hello everyone, Thanks a million for all this good advice, I was in Germany for the weekend and seized the opportunity to investigate the marbling equipment
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 30, 2002
      Hello everyone,

      Thanks a million for all this good advice,

      I was in Germany for the weekend and seized the opportunity to
      investigate the marbling equipment they have in Munich. It seems it has
      also gone out of fashion there but I eventually found a Deka set (the
      size powder is still a mystery though) I’m looking forward to testing.

      I’ll say more when I have read the book I’ve ordered ("The Ultimate
      Marbling Handbook" by Diane Maurer-Mathison). I had to order by chance
      since there wasn’t anything at all at my local bookshops.



      Tried Pebeo again and tests are better but sometimes the paint just
      “peels” off the paper when the sheet or fabric is being rinsed (???).

      A still very determined Marlene ;-)

      -----Message d'origine-----
      De : Jake Benson [mailto:jemiljan@...]
      Envoyé : jeudi, 26. septembre 2002 22:04
      À : Marbling list
      Objet : [Marbling] Marbling in Switzerland



      Greetings, everyone!

      I wanted to throw in my 2 cents.

      I agree that looking for distributors of food suppliers for carragheenan
      is
      a good place to start- but you may find you have to test the various
      strengths to arrive at a successful method- so hard work and patience
      just
      as Milena said.

      At the Ascona bookbinding school, which Vi mentioned, they do proffer a
      type
      of marbling which is referred to "Ascona Marbling". It is done with a
      type
      of oil color floated on a fairly viscous size, which appears to me to be
      a
      cellulose ether of some sort- It may be Methyl cellulose, but also could
      be
      ethulose (Sold under a brand name of Tylose). Since the oil colors
      react
      very strongly compared to acrylic and from water colors, the tougher
      size
      seems to be a good balance. Anne Chambers also told me once that she
      found
      Ethulose a better size for acrylics.

      Ironically, I had always noticed a resemblance between Tini Miura's
      "Oleaugraphs" and the style of marbling using the "Ascona Method". I
      knew
      that Tini had studied in Ascona with the master binder Hugo Peller (in
      1963). At the IMG, I asked her about this, and if she learned the
      marbling
      there. She replied that she had developed the marbling on her own, and
      had
      actually taught Hugo's Wife how to do it at that time .... And from that
      emerged the so-called "Ascona Style".

      A) you can contact the Ascona school and get their kit. They also sell
      quality bookbinding tools and supplies.

      B) you can search dairy suppliers (no shortage of that in Switzerland!)
      for
      carragheenan, but may have to try several varieties.

      C) Karli Frigge and Geert Van Daal in Holland both used cooked moss-
      maybe
      dried Irish Moss can be found in a health food store?

      D) Marie Ange Doizy in France mentions using Guar gum. This is also an
      additive to foods. Ingrid Weimann told me that Christopher Weimann used
      Guar Gum, with acrylic colors. I also think Michel Duval used a Gum
      bath
      with oil colors. Suppliers in Paris could be Rouge et Plé
      (Bookbinding),
      Sennelier (art supplies and high quality pigments), or perhaps a
      bookbinding
      supplier such as Jullien Leather can refer you to sources.

      E) Nedim Sönmex in Germany has developed a line of "Sönmez Marbling
      Colors"- a type of water color, which he told me is based on Halfer's
      formulas. These appeared very nice and consistent, and would be
      suitable
      for traditional work. I am not sure if he is selling them to his
      students
      or not. He also uses carragheenan powder. As he is Germany, perhaps
      this
      is another source to chase. Personally, I make my own colors from dry
      pigments and have used a number of pigments available from the german
      company Kremer Pigmente. Kremer sells other supplies like Methyl
      Cellulose
      that can be used as a size with acrylics. Schminke also makes
      excellent,
      finely ground pigments, but I like Dr. Kremer's quantity prices.

      Everyone's name is listed in the directory that is aviable from Marie
      Palowoda.

      Most important of all, please let us all know WHAT you find in the end,
      as
      these kinds of questions appear periodically. We need to develop an
      awareness of supplies available in different countries around the
      world...


      Happy Hunting!

      Jake Benson


      Benson's Hand Bindery
      Fine Custom Bookbinding & Conservation
      Hand Marbled Papers
      1319 B Summerville Ave.
      Columbia S.C. 29201
      Phone: 803.799.1853
      jemiljan@...








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