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needed words from lessons learned

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  • jazzcatsclifton@cs.com
    I am so delighted to be able to be a part of this group and eavesdrop on the superstars of marbling. I have a favor to ask of you. I have studied twice at
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 19 10:44 AM
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      I am so delighted to be able to be a part of this group and eavesdrop on the
      superstars of marbling. I have a favor to ask of you. I have studied twice
      at Arrowmont with Mimi Schleicher. Both times were wonderful experiences. I
      am now getting anxious to be able to do this work on my own, in my own
      locale. So, I am writing a grant to have Mimi join me at a local artists'
      retreat so that she can guide me in my early stages in my own environment.

      I know that many of you slugged it out in your own kitchens with very little
      assistance.
      However, if I can avoid the heartache and take advantage of other lessons
      learned, I am going to go for it. The favor I would like to ask of any of
      you who would be willing is to write a sentence or two explaining why
      studying with a mentor in my own environment would be advantageous. I fear
      that the grants panel won't understand why a few "how to" books, a video and
      my past Arrowmont experience shouldn't be enough to get me started. I am an
      artist but I also have a more than full-time job as an arts administrator.
      This is the first time I have written a grant to benefit me personally. It
      would be so wonderful to get it. I am trying to make the best of my
      resources - financial and time.

      If any of you have words of wisdom that I could share with the panel, you
      could respond to me personally or to the group. Many thanks, in advance.

      Debbie
      jazzcatsclifton@...
    • Gail MacKenzie
      Hello Debbie, This may sound a bit silly, but I know it to be the absolute truth. Successful, professional high quality marbling results depend not only upon
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 19 11:08 AM
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        Hello Debbie, This may sound a bit silly, but I know it to be the absolute
        truth. Successful, professional high quality marbling results depend not
        only upon the artist and the pigments. Humidity, barometric pressure and
        temperature besides water quality are important variables. You have to be
        able to master and understand the variables in your own environment before
        you can successfully expand. Best wishes, Gail MacKenzie


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • V. Wilson
        I concur with other postings to the list. The best teacher is what you experience in your own particular/peculiar environment. It is wonderful to have a
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 20 8:18 PM
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          I concur with other postings to the list. The best teacher is what you
          experience in your own particular/peculiar environment. It is wonderful to
          have a mentor, as I did/do in Don Guyot, but the bottom line is he was
          not/is not there every time I marble/d; he could not see the problem I was
          having and in the end it was up to me to find the solution. It is also true
          that those things learned the hard way, are what you remember the best, and
          they are also the most rewarding.
          Good luck!

          Vi Wilson
        • sixshort
          -I agree with Vi, who has been my invaluable mentor for the past three years. It helps greatly to have someone to discuss your marbling with - someone who can
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 22 6:42 AM
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            -I agree with Vi, who has been my invaluable mentor for the past
            three years. It helps greatly to have someone to discuss your
            marbling with - someone who can make suggestions and observations,
            but the art of marbling is a process, something that evolves
            gradually. Even the most highly skilled marbling teacher such as Mimi
            can only teach what you can absorb in a given time. The process of
            marbling seems to me to be more of practice, observation, study and
            help from others who are more skilled, rather than one of
            concentrated tuition. I wish you well in your endeavours to obtain a
            grant, and would be interested to hear how you progress if you do
            succeed. For some reason I regard marbling as somewhat arcane, with
            elements of chance and mystery, so for me the journey is far more
            fascinating than the end results. Joan Ajala-- In Marbling@y..., "V.
            Wilson" <rondelay@a...> wrote:
            > I concur with other postings to the list. The best teacher is what
            you
            > experience in your own particular/peculiar environment. It is
            wonderful to
            > have a mentor, as I did/do in Don Guyot, but the bottom line is he
            was
            > not/is not there every time I marble/d; he could not see the
            problem I was
            > having and in the end it was up to me to find the solution. It is
            also true
            > that those things learned the hard way, are what you remember the
            best, and
            > they are also the most rewarding.
            > Good luck!
            >
            > Vi Wilson
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