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  • Milena Hughes
    Practiced by a novice, suminagashi is the most simplistic form of marbling, yet can be quite deceiving! With focused study, (and patience) one can learn brush
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 26, 2002
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      Practiced by a novice, suminagashi is the most simplistic form of marbling,
      yet can be quite deceiving! With focused study, (and patience) one can
      learn brush control, line variance, plus color harmony and composition to
      create a beautiful and delicate sheet of suminagashi on Japanese papers.
      The lines should not be smeared or running, rather they should be sharp and
      balanced well between the non-color. Using the colors as they come from the
      Boku Undo kit can be extremely garish....try mixing a few. Boku Undo colors
      are dyes rather than pigments and will transfer to most any paper (and
      silk)...I 've even used high gloss tag board with excellent results. Diane
      Maurer's marbling books and supplies enable even the most inept to obtain
      good results without too much effort. Be sure to use good brushes with
      SHARP points.

      There is a small dedicated group of artists who study the technique with me
      in the Chicago area. These are usually twelve hour weekend workshops or
      four weekly sessions of three hours. We will begin a course in Advanced
      Suminagashi next week, practicing "Pebbles in the Creek", "Cloth in the
      Wind" (names I have given to patterns that can be repeated and look very
      similar each time) plus additional masking techniques. A note of caution:
      using the "one teaspoon of color to one drop of wetting agent" formula will
      deplete your Boku Undo kit quite rapidly unless you are planning to work at
      one session for a long period of time. Sometimes it is best (for adults)
      to experiment using only a few drops of color and one drop of diluted
      wetting agent....testing just as one does in traditional marbling. When the
      formula is working, one can create very large papers, scrolls, and fabrics
      of unique images. It is well worth the time and effort!

      Also- I have had many phone calls from frustrated teachers who have had
      disastrous results with children because...they did not know how to create
      (let alone teach) suminagashi in the correct manner. It is pleasing to read
      that there have been excellent results from those of you who KNOW WHAT YOU
      ARE DOING!


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