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  • susaglenn
    Hi, Gina, I m sorry, but I have been at this full time for 2 years & I have discovered a lot of things about it, but nothing is particularly simple about any
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 25, 2002
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      Hi, Gina,
      I'm sorry, but I have been at this full time for 2 years & I have
      discovered a lot of things about it, but nothing is particularly
      simple about any of it except for all of the components taken
      individually. So your request for a simple method stumps me. My
      advice is to get every marbling book you can get your hands on &
      study them. Study the archives here; there is a wealth of good
      advice for free. Get yourself a tray (dimensions determined by what
      you want to do), some paint (type determined by what you are after),
      some size (methylcel or carrageenan - there's good & bad about both,
      you choose), the various accoutrements, and have a go at it. Even at
      the beginning the process is very addicting and wonderful. And
      frustrating. You will learn by doing. Good luck!
      Susa Glenn

      - In Marbling@y..., "glb662002" <burgessg@b...> wrote:
      > Just thought that I would introduce myself to the group.
      > My name is Gina, I am married mother of one 12year old girl. I
      have
      > been a stamper for about two years now and have just come to the
      > point of making my own paper and hopefully marbling as well!
      > However, I need all the advise I can get. At this point I would
      like
      > to use any KISS methods anyone has till I get the hang of it.
      > TTFN
      > Gina
    • jemiljan
      I wonder for those who want to try marbling for the very first time if recommending a Boku Undo Suminagashi kit would be a good idea. It really seems to me
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 25, 2002
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        I wonder for those who want to try marbling for the very first time if
        recommending a Boku Undo Suminagashi kit would be a good
        idea. It really seems to me the most easy method of marbling,
        and you really don't have to make anything up. Paper is an issue
        though.

        I would love to hear if there is a cheaper paper that works well
        with these colors. Soon i will punge into the world of arts
        education, and this really seems to me the most suitable
        method for elementary school art teachers. It would be
        interesting to hear comments from others who have taught or
        demonstrated marbling in a school setting.

        Jake Benson
      • dkmaurer1@aol.com
        Hello All, You beat me to it. Iwas going to respond that suminagashi using Boku Undo dyes is the way to go! It is easy and foolproof if you follow the
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 25, 2002
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          Hello All,

          You beat me to it. Iwas going to respond that suminagashi using Boku Undo
          dyes is the way to go! It is easy and foolproof if you follow the
          instructions using one drop of photoflo to adjust a teaspoon of color and
          stir well each time you apply the color. Forget the instructions in the box
          of Boku Undo colors. I sell all the supplies for suminagashi and use and
          recommend Loew-Cornell Oriental rice paper. It is $13.75 for forty-eight
          12X18sheets. Not bad, really...... Charcoal papers and unsized HMP also
          usually work well. Mohawk Superfine (more expensive)is also great. Go to my
          website www.dianemaurer.com to see examples of suminagashi which looks very
          little like traditional marbling but is beautiful in its own right --
          especially the double-image designs. I'll be demonstrating suminagashi at the
          IMG if you get a chance to stop by. I'd be happy to e-mail an instruction
          sheet to anyone interested.

          Best,
          Diane Maurer
          www.dianemaurer.com
        • James M Mahoney
          Jake, in reply to your inquiry about suminagashi vs. traditional marbling in a school setting - Well, I guess I am the other side of the coin, Diane (hi!). I
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 25, 2002
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            Jake, in reply to your inquiry about suminagashi vs. traditional marbling
            in a school setting -

            Well, I guess I am the other side of the coin, Diane (hi!). I have both
            demonstrated and taught marbling in the elementary school setting, from
            kindergarten through 5th grade. I will preface my opinion with the
            statement that I really love both of these styles, so hopefully my
            feelings have nothing to do with outcomes. I have found that the
            suminagashi is much easier for set-up and supplies (and I love your Boku
            Undo colors, Diane); however, I have not found these little ones
            (particularly the lower grades) to have the dexterity and the
            "gentleness" in application that makes the suminagashi successful; it
            doesn't seem to hold their attention as well - perhaps because the
            patterns and colors on the paper are much lighter and delicate. All the
            kids I have worked with, from kindergarten on up, have been successful
            and have been mesmerized by the traditional marbling - they love it! The
            great thing is that they are each and every one successful - instant
            gratification - and they have something in their hands they have created
            that is beautiful to them! Before taking it into the school setting, I
            tried it out first on my grandsons, at the time aged 3 to 9 yrs. old,
            with great success and very few problems. True, it does involve a little
            more to do it the traditional way, but I adapted several steps and found
            it workable with kids everywhere from a carpeted Barnes & Noble bookstore
            to classrooms to school ground art fairs. I would be glad to share
            particulars with anyone who's interested.

            Just my own experience with kids and the processes - hope others will
            also share theirs.

            Monita Mahoney (Greer, SC)

            On Thu, 25 Jul 2002 18:32:16 -0000 "jemiljan" <jemiljan@...>
            writes:
            > I wonder for those who want to try marbling for the very first time
            > if
            > recommending a Boku Undo Suminagashi kit would be a good
            > idea. It really seems to me the most easy method of marbling,
            > and you really don't have to make anything up. Paper is an issue
            > though.
            >
            > I would love to hear if there is a cheaper paper that works well
            > with these colors. Soon i will punge into the world of arts
            > education, and this really seems to me the most suitable
            > method for elementary school art teachers. It would be
            > interesting to hear comments from others who have taught or
            > demonstrated marbling in a school setting.
            >
            > Jake Benson
            >
            >
            > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
          • Carol Scott
            Dear All, I too have had a great deal of experience teaching little ones both styles of marbling.and agree with James Mahoney, that more success is with the
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 26, 2002
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              Dear All,

              I too have had a great deal of experience teaching little ones both
              styles of marbling.and agree with James Mahoney, that more success is
              with the traditional method.His reasons are so accurately and elequently
              stated. One tip that I use at the grade school level is to set up
              each group of tanks with 4 or 5 colors. I then let individuals choose
              3 or 4 of those colors for their individual sheets. I get the most
              milage out of these colors by letting the kids use different colors of
              papers.

              Carol Scott

              James M Mahoney wrote:

              > Jake, in reply to your inquiry about suminagashi vs. traditional
              > marbling
              > in a school setting -
              >
              > Well, I guess I am the other side of the coin, Diane (hi!). I have
              > both
              > demonstrated and taught marbling in the elementary school setting,
              > from
              > kindergarten through 5th grade. I will preface my opinion with the
              > statement that I really love both of these styles, so hopefully my
              > feelings have nothing to do with outcomes. I have found that the
              > suminagashi is much easier for set-up and supplies (and I love your
              > Boku
              > Undo colors, Diane); however, I have not found these little ones
              > (particularly the lower grades) to have the dexterity and the
              > "gentleness" in application that makes the suminagashi successful; it
              > doesn't seem to hold their attention as well - perhaps because the
              > patterns and colors on the paper are much lighter and delicate. All
              > the
              > kids I have worked with, from kindergarten on up, have been successful
              >
              > and have been mesmerized by the traditional marbling - they love it!
              > The
              > great thing is that they are each and every one successful - instant
              > gratification - and they have something in their hands they have
              > created
              > that is beautiful to them! Before taking it into the school setting,
              > I
              > tried it out first on my grandsons, at the time aged 3 to 9 yrs. old,
              > with great success and very few problems. True, it does involve a
              > little
              > more to do it the traditional way, but I adapted several steps and
              > found
              > it workable with kids everywhere from a carpeted Barnes & Noble
              > bookstore
              > to classrooms to school ground art fairs. I would be glad to share
              > particulars with anyone who's interested.
              >
              > Just my own experience with kids and the processes - hope others will
              > also share theirs.
              >
              > Monita Mahoney (Greer, SC)
              >
              > On Thu, 25 Jul 2002 18:32:16 -0000 "jemiljan"
              > <jemiljan@...>
              > writes:
              > > I wonder for those who want to try marbling for the very first time
              > > if
              > > recommending a Boku Undo Suminagashi kit would be a good
              > > idea. It really seems to me the most easy method of marbling,
              > > and you really don't have to make anything up. Paper is an issue
              > > though.
              > >
              > > I would love to hear if there is a cheaper paper that works well
              > > with these colors. Soon i will punge into the world of arts
              > > education, and this really seems to me the most suitable
              > > method for elementary school art teachers. It would be
              > > interesting to hear comments from others who have taught or
              > > demonstrated marbling in a school setting.
              > >
              > > Jake Benson
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              ADVERTISEMENT

              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • tmarthad
              ... Boku Undo ... color and ... in the box ... use and ... eight ... also ... Go to my ... looks very Diane, I have used the Oriental Rice Paper before but
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 29, 2002
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                --- In Marbling@y..., dkmaurer1@a... wrote:
                > Hello All,
                >
                > You beat me to it. Iwas going to respond that suminagashi using
                Boku Undo
                > dyes is the way to go! It is easy and foolproof if you follow the
                > instructions using one drop of photoflo to adjust a teaspoon of
                color and
                > stir well each time you apply the color. Forget the instructions
                in the box
                > of Boku Undo colors. I sell all the supplies for suminagashi and
                use and
                > recommend Loew-Cornell Oriental rice paper. It is $13.75 for forty-
                eight
                > 12X18sheets. Not bad, really...... Charcoal papers and unsized HMP
                also
                > usually work well. Mohawk Superfine (more expensive)is also great.
                Go to my
                > website www.dianemaurer.com to see examples of suminagashi which
                looks very

                Diane, I have used the Oriental Rice Paper before but have lost my
                source. Please send me your catalog of that and other supplies.
                Martha MTDATPW@AOL>Com Thanks
                > little like traditional marbling but is beautiful in its own right -
                -
                > especially the double-image designs. I'll be demonstrating
                suminagashi at the
                > IMG if you get a chance to stop by. I'd be happy to e-mail an
                instruction
                > sheet to anyone interested.
                >
                > Best,
                > Diane Maurer
                > www.dianemaurer.com
              • molliann@aol.com
                Jake, about suminagashi with kindergarten and up - It has been part of my art curriculum for several years. Until this year I used speedball ink and assorted
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 9, 2002
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                  Jake, about suminagashi with kindergarten and up - It has been part of my art
                  curriculum for several years. Until this year I used speedball ink and
                  assorted acrylics and photo flo dispersant with varied success. This past
                  year, I used the boku inks with much more consistant results.
                  As someone has already mentioned, that horrible cheap manilla paper really
                  works quite well. If your budget allows, also use Diane's Rice paper. I gave
                  the students the manilla first and then the delicate rice paper later in the
                  session. The rice paper was harder for the younger students to handle but the
                  colors on the rice paper are more vivid.
                  The younger students (kindergarten - second grade) have trouble controlling
                  the the bamboo brushes and the ink. This past year, I gave them pencils to
                  dip in the ink and placed the ink in baby food jars. Each color ink had its
                  own color of pencil - blue pencil - blue ink. I also limited the colors.
                  Beginning with black and dispersant and slowly adding additional colors- up
                  to three - black, blue and red.
                  I set the classroom up with two students to a tank (large plastic containers
                  from Wal-mart). I have taught up to 24 students at one time using this
                  method.- many classes are kindergarten.
                  Suminagashi is a great marbling project for students - it is not expensive,
                  it introduces them to marbling, and they love it. Good luck!
                • mpmh60201
                  Not quite sure what some of you are teaching the young ones. Please! If you are teaching suminagashi...DO IT RIGHT and don t insult the many generations of the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 10, 2002
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                    Not quite sure what some of you are teaching the young ones.
                    Please! If you are teaching suminagashi...DO IT RIGHT and don't insult
                    the many generations of the revered Hiroba family. Getting the colors
                    to float on water does not mean that it is "suminagashi". Even some
                    of the most exquisite current book samples are (much) more
                    contemporary versions of this ancient craft. Perhaps, at such a young
                    age, these students should be taught basic "Marbling on Water" (or
                    Marbling 101?) rather than calling it suminagashi. I'm thinking that
                    the technique is REALLY GETTING WATERED DOWN, and doesn't, in the
                    least, resemble true suminagashi. Treat yourselves to a fine example
                    of this exquisite Japanese paper by ordering a lovely sheet from
                    Aiko's Art Materials and Supplies in Chicago (USA). Aiko Nakane (now
                    retired) was the first person to import Japanese papers in the USA
                    many, many years ago. The shop is at 3347 N. Clark Street, Chicago,
                    IL, 60657 (773.404.5600), a treat to visit...a "must" if you come to
                    the windy city!...filled with treasures beyond description when it
                    comes to handmade Japanese papers.

                    By the way, a pad or roll of Sumi-e, or Shoji paper is quite
                    reasonable at most art supply stores. Students of oriental brush
                    painting use it all the time. The Shoji is stronger and can be
                    handled with ease. Some sumi-e rolls have long fibers in the pulp and
                    this prevents tearing when wet. Handmade Japanese papers have enabled
                    me to create scrolls that are five to seven feet long. The papers
                    often look very delicate, but are actually quite strong. Papers made
                    in India and Thailand also work well and are a little more reasonable
                    in price. These are usually large sheets and can be cut down to fit
                    small trays.

                    I have been teaching suminagashi for about eighteen years, only after
                    getting my papers approved by Aiko. There is much interest at ALL age
                    levels, and I'm currently instructing a summer class in delicately
                    beautiful "advanced suminagashi" (students must already know the
                    basics). The oldest participant is 80 years young. It is her third
                    class and she hasn't missed one session of it! How wonderful it would
                    be if a few of the "wee" ones out there continue to learn for many
                    more years. Who knows, with much encouragement...perhaps a new
                    "Master" might emerge! Keep introduc
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