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Re: bubbles

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  • sixshort
    Dear Tom, Last August you mentioned that you were trying your Indian handmade papers again, and that you would let me know the results. How did you get on?
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 18, 2002
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      Dear Tom, Last August you mentioned that you were trying your Indian
      handmade papers again, and that you would let me know the results.
      How did you get on? from Joan Ajalah--- In Marbling@y...,
      leech541@a... wrote:
      > Dear Joan, This is getting interesting. Now i remember having a
      similar
      > problem years ago when i used the Indian handmades. I think i must
      not be
      > nearly as persistent as you. I just put them aside and avoided
      them, thinking
      > the problem was with the me. Too bad, because they are such a good
      buy.
      > Anyway, i'm going to be doing some marbling today and will give
      them a try.
      >
      > I have some thoughts about what the problem might be though. First,
      i'm
      > curious about why you submerge the paper in the first place. Is
      that to get
      > the bubbles out? When I alum i use a spray bottle and a sponge.
      Maybe 2 or
      > even 3 applications of alum, sponged in well would work (?). I
      think a long
      > soak in water (water being the universal solvent) might be worth a
      try. Like
      > at least overnight, as if you were soaking it for etching, and as
      long as a
      > couple of days, with a rinse once in while thrown in for good
      measure. The
      > Indian papers i've used for printmaking are tough as can be, and
      you could
      > probably hit them with a fire hose and they would stay in one piece.
      >
      > Anyway, after thoroughly soaking them you would want to dry them
      flat before
      > aluming and marbling. And then try to marble with them while still
      damp and
      > limp from the aluming. Once they have dried out you would probably
      have to
      > really wrestle with them.
      >
      > My guess as to the source of the problem is that it comes from the
      sizing. It
      > is probably applied to the various papers you mentioned in
      different ways,
      > but if it is a surface sizing it could easily have trapped air in
      the fibers.
      > Less likely would be bleach or caustic soda, because they would
      have been
      > diluted and evenly distributed throughout the sheet. If the
      chemical used as
      > internal sizing is applied directly to the sheet, as a surface
      size, it
      > would be extremely tough and probably spotty.
      >
      > This does bring to mind the wonderful and no doubt funniest book
      ever
      > written about marbling - Henry Morris' "The World's Worst Marbled
      Papers." It
      > used Indian handmade papers, marbled with the worst collection of
      bubbles,
      > spots, dust and other flaws imaginable. It never occured to me
      that some of
      > the flaws could be attributed to the paper, but i'll bet that is
      the case.
      >
      > Anyway, that's all for now. I'll let you know what happens with my
      marbling
      > today. tom
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