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Ironing paper

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  • nwdreamr
    I am so glad I have found this group! Is it too much to ask to achieve perfectly flat paper after ironing, and putting under weights overnight? I have a
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 10, 2002
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      I am so glad I have found this group!

      Is it too much to ask to achieve perfectly flat paper after ironing,
      and putting under weights overnight? I have a specific need for 65
      lb card stock to be perfectly flat after the marbling, drying and
      ironing. I am wanting to create original greeting cards with a
      photo on marbled paper but am very disappointed with the end result
      of attempting to flatten my cardstock.

      Thank you so much for your help.

      jan
    • tkuroda
      Dear jan I am doing press marble papers using hard cover books, 3~4 days. But ironing is extrawork for press. I think, it is better not to ironing paper befor
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 10, 2002
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        Dear jan
        I am doing press marble papers using hard cover books, 3~4 days. But
        ironing is extrawork for press. I think, it is better not to ironing paper
        befor press.
        Sensui wrote
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "nwdreamr" <nwdreamr@...>
        To: <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2002 7:07 AM
        Subject: [Marbling] Ironing paper


        > I am so glad I have found this group!
        >
        > Is it too much to ask to achieve perfectly flat paper after ironing,
        > and putting under weights overnight? I have a specific need for 65
        > lb card stock to be perfectly flat after the marbling, drying and
        > ironing. I am wanting to create original greeting cards with a
        > photo on marbled paper but am very disappointed with the end result
        > of attempting to flatten my cardstock.
        >
        > Thank you so much for your help.
        >
        > jan
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • hamburgerbuntpapier_de
        As a restorer, I m all against ironing dry paper (meaning paper after the production process is completed) except in a case of emergency. Hydrogen bridges in
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 11, 2003
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          As a restorer, I'm all against ironing dry paper (meaning paper after
          the production process is completed) except in a case of emergency.
          Hydrogen bridges in the paper are easily destroyed by ironing it, which
          diminishes elasticity and therefore enhances chances of the paper to
          "break" during further processing as well as during ageing. Better
          leave sheets in the press, gently!! Or if you don't own a press, make
          exact piles, put them in layers of not more than 25 - 30 sheets under
          boards, place a brick on the uppermost board and forget all about it
          for a day or two. Gentle pressure does the trick much better than tons
          of weight.

          Susanne Krause
        • irisnevins
          Great info. I have a big heavy paper cutter.....it sits on top of the boards holding the papers, overnight they are pretty flat. Iris Nevins Message text
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 12, 2003
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            Great info. I have a big heavy paper cutter.....it sits on top of the
            boards holding the papers, overnight they are pretty flat.
            Iris Nevins


            Message text written by INTERNET:Marbling@yahoogroups.com
            >
            As a restorer, I'm all against ironing dry paper (meaning paper after
            the production process is completed) except in a case of emergency.
            Hydrogen bridges in the paper are easily destroyed by ironing it, which
            diminishes elasticity and therefore enhances chances of the paper to
            "break" during further processing as well as during ageing. Better
            leave sheets in the press, gently!! Or if you don't own a press, make
            exact piles, put them in layers of not more than 25 - 30 sheets under
            boards, place a brick on the uppermost board and forget all about it
            for a day or two. Gentle pressure does the trick much better than tons
            of weight.

            Susanne Krause
            <
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