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Splatters,Methyl.Spirits,Varnish

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  • Milena Hughes
    To All- Be very careful with meth. spirits- it s a cancer causing agent which accumulates in the body. Even just a bit is too much! Why not use a plastic drop
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 28, 2002
      To All-
      Be very careful with meth. spirits- it's a cancer causing agent which
      accumulates in the body. Even just a bit is too much! Why not use a
      plastic drop cloth under and around your tank area? Depending on the
      thickness, it can be wiped clean with a scrub sponge. (Elbow grease is
      healthier!). An old clean shower curtain works well, too. I have
      eliminated much splattering by using brushes to apply the paints and
      inks. It takes a bit of practice, but well worth the effort. When
      varnishing marbled wood- take extra care with the sanding between coats
      of varnish so as not to remove any of the pattern. Varnishing marbled
      wood items IS NOT same as varnishing furniture, but the results can be
      just as spectacular. -Milena
    • J Dolphin
      This post starts to make me think. I don t think hazards of marbling has ever been addressed here. It s not like there are international standards and
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 28, 2002
        This post starts to make me think. I don't think hazards of marbling has
        ever been addressed here. It's not like there are international standards
        and regulations for practising. I would welcome one and All to input what
        they know to be dangerous, what might be a hazard, what would be tolerable
        to do on occasion. I am certain responses to this would benefit us all.
        Thanks
        Jill
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Milena Hughes" <milena@...>
        To: "Marbling Group" <Marbling@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, April 28, 2002 12:17 PM
        Subject: [Marbling] Splatters,Methyl.Spirits,Varnish


        > To All-
        > Be very careful with meth. spirits- it's a cancer causing agent which
        > accumulates in the body. Even just a bit is too much! Why not use a
        > plastic drop cloth under and around your tank area? Depending on the
        > thickness, it can be wiped clean with a scrub sponge. (Elbow grease is
        > healthier!). An old clean shower curtain works well, too. I have
        > eliminated much splattering by using brushes to apply the paints and
        > inks. It takes a bit of practice, but well worth the effort. When
        > varnishing marbled wood- take extra care with the sanding between coats
        > of varnish so as not to remove any of the pattern. Varnishing marbled
        > wood items IS NOT same as varnishing furniture, but the results can be
        > just as spectacular. -Milena
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • V. Wilson
        Might as well add my pennyworth .. Like Milena, I use a large plastic sheet to prevent paint stains on the floor surface. I bought a queen bed size mattress
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 28, 2002
          Might as well add my pennyworth ..

          Like Milena, I use a large plastic sheet to prevent paint stains on the
          floor surface. I bought a queen bed size mattress cover (used for storage
          purposes) which I opened out to make a very large sheet. On top of this I
          use a painters drop sheet, because water on plastic becomes very
          slippery. At the end of marbling I simply launder the drop sheet. I do
          not like the idea of dried paint on the drop sheet due to the risk of
          paint dust particles becoming airborne. If the plastic sheet becomes
          stained, I simply take it outside and hose it. This system works well for me.

          Vi Wilson


          4/28/02 -0500, you wrote:
          >To All-
          >Be very careful with meth. spirits- it's a cancer causing agent which
          >accumulates in the body. Even just a bit is too much! Why not use a
          >plastic drop cloth under and around your tank area? Depending on the
          >thickness, it can be wiped clean with a scrub sponge. (Elbow grease is
          >healthier!). An old clean shower curtain works well, too. I have
          >eliminated much splattering by using brushes to apply the paints and
          >inks. It takes a bit of practice, but well worth the effort. When
          >varnishing marbled wood- take extra care with the sanding between coats
          >of varnish so as not to remove any of the pattern. Varnishing marbled
          >wood items IS NOT same as varnishing furniture, but the results can be
          >just as spectacular. -Milena
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • vienna_plush
          I couldn t verify that Methanol (I assume we are talking of the simplest of all alcohols, CH3OH) is carcinogenic and it probably is a question of definition
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 29, 2002
            I couldn't verify that Methanol (I assume we are talking of the
            simplest of all alcohols, CH3OH) is carcinogenic and it probably is a
            question of definition whether a substance is called carcinogenic or
            not. Actually this substance can damage our health and is in fact
            toxic with a lethal dose of something between 5 and 100 grams (I
            quote a medical information source here).
            Methanol is popularly known for turning people blind, as it is part
            of the fusel substances this affects the consumer of cheap bootleg
            liquor. First indications of methanol poisoning would be nausea,
            headache and dizziness, later impaired vision and dyspnea, leading to
            unconsciousness. Organs affected are eye, liver, kidney and heart.
            In fact ethanol is a perfect solvent in a household when water is
            less effective, ethanol or ethyl alcohol (C2H5OH) will often do the
            quite same. This substance is toxic, too, but to a lesser extent -
            ethyl alcohol is what we all know as "alcohol" in wine or beer.
            In my opinion the most dangerous substances we marblers are
            surrounded are some of the pigments we use. They may be toxic because
            they are a chemical compound of a heavy metal (lead) or other toxic
            substances used. Be careful with the dust as someone else recommended
            before. It is always a question of the dose. I trust that laws and
            regulations, and especially for you in the US the product liability
            regulations, protect us "consumers" to a useful extent from being
            affected by whatsoever as long as we are watchful.

            Regards,
            Clemens Swatonek


            --- In Marbling@y..., "J Dolphin" <jdolphin@s...> wrote:
            > This post starts to make me think. I don't think hazards of
            marbling has
            > ever been addressed here. It's not like there are international
            standards
            > and regulations for practising. I would welcome one and All to
            input what
            > they know to be dangerous, what might be a hazard, what would be
            tolerable
            > to do on occasion. I am certain responses to this would benefit us
            all.
            > Thanks
            > Jill
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "Milena Hughes" <milena@i...>
            > To: "Marbling Group" <Marbling@y...>
            > Sent: Sunday, April 28, 2002 12:17 PM
            > Subject: [Marbling] Splatters,Methyl.Spirits,Varnish
            >
            >
            > > To All-
            > > Be very careful with meth. spirits- it's a cancer causing agent
            which
            > > accumulates in the body. Even just a bit is too much! Why not
            use a
            > > plastic drop cloth under and around your tank area? Depending on
            the
            > > thickness, it can be wiped clean with a scrub sponge. (Elbow
            grease is
            > > healthier!). An old clean shower curtain works well, too. I have
            > > eliminated much splattering by using brushes to apply the paints
            and
            > > inks. It takes a bit of practice, but well worth the effort.
            When
            > > varnishing marbled wood- take extra care with the sanding between
            coats
            > > of varnish so as not to remove any of the pattern. Varnishing
            marbled
            > > wood items IS NOT same as varnishing furniture, but the results
            can be
            > > just as spectacular. -Milena
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > >
            > >
          • sixshort
            -Hi Milena, Thanks for the info re methylated spirits - I was unaware that it is cancer causing. Are the fumes the problem, or is it skin contact? I hardly
            Message 5 of 5 , May 1, 2002
              -Hi Milena, Thanks for the info re methylated spirits - I was unaware
              that it is cancer causing. Are the fumes the problem, or is it skin
              contact? I hardly ever need to use it, and wear latex gloves, but
              would still like to know more about metho. Heaven help the old metho
              drinkers! Joan
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