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Re: New composition -- Invocatio (MIDI)

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  • mschulter
    Hello, there John deLaubenfels, and please let me warmly thank you for taking such an interest in my piece, and encourage you to post your retunings -- yes,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 31, 2001
      Hello, there John deLaubenfels, and please let me warmly thank you for
      taking such an interest in my piece, and encourage you to post your
      retunings -- yes, including the one in 12-tET <grin>, a standard lute
      tuning from around 1545 or 1550 on.

      My first guess might be that your impression of the music as "rather
      jarring to my ear horizontally, at times" could be a very understandable
      reaction not to the small adaptive JI adjustments (~5.38 cents), but to
      the enharmonic diesis or fifthtone shifts of 128:125, or about 41.06 cents
      -- 1/31 octave in the almost identical 31-tET model you mention, or about
      38.71 cents.

      This can be startling to listeners in the 16th century or 21st
      century, definitely "xenharmonic," and something that got Vicentino
      very mixed reviews.

      Vincenzo Galilei, for example, a noted lutenist and theorist who wasn't at
      all afraid to take on the musical establishment of the time (much like his
      son, the astronomer Galileo, with the science establishment), concluded
      that "the enharmonic diesis is contrary to the nature of singing and
      disproportionate with our sense of hearing."

      Vicentino, interestingly, gives performers the option of ignoring his
      fifthtone shifts, something which would permit his enharmonic pieces
      to be played on usual 12-note meantone keyboards without the extra
      notes a fifthtone apart.

      Here's a link to my score, where the fifthtone steps are indicated by
      an asterisk (*) raising a note by 128:125 in 1/4-comma meantone, or by
      1/31 octave in 31-tET.

      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MakeMicroMusic/message/143>

      If you're reducing the piece to 12-tET before doing the adaptive
      retuning, then I suspect that in effect you're doing just what
      Vicentino discusses: converting an enharmonic piece with fifthtone
      inflections to one with more familiar diatonic and chromatic steps.

      In fact, quite apart from the adaptive tuning or adaptive JI aspects,
      this kind of playing around with different versions could be a great
      way to let people try out what Renaissance or Xeno-Renaissance music
      is all about. We could have versions of the same piece with or without
      fifthtone shifts or progressions, and with or without adaptive tuning
      or JI as opposed to usual meantone or 31-tET.

      Please post those retunings, and thank you for a dialogue through
      words and music which brings together 16th-century and 21st-century
      approaches to adaptive tuning and JI.

      In peace and friendship,

      Margo
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