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Re: [MaineTwoFooters] Mass meet / Mid Hudson meet

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  • Wesley Ewell
    Whitman is scheduled for Saturday, November 10th from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM. -Wes Ewell ... From: william cole To:
    Message 1 of 27 , Sep 23, 2007
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      Whitman is scheduled for Saturday, November 10th from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.  -Wes Ewell

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: william cole <billcwithonec@...>
      To: MaineTwoFooters@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2007 12:00:01 PM
      Subject: [MaineTwoFooters] Mass meet / Mid Hudson meet

      looking for dates (links???) for the Whitman (MA) 2
      foot meet and the Mid-Hudson Maxi Meet (NY)
      Thanx.
      Bill

      Bc

      LOandS@yahoogroups. com
      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
      "...Tis the set of the sail and not the gale
      Which determines the way they go. ...."
      -EWW
      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
      70x7, Matthew 18:21-22
      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
      http://www.aflcio. org/corporatewat ch/paywatch/ ceou/database. cfm#S


    • edfillion448@cs.com
      Hi Bill, The Mid-Hudson meet is Friday Oct 26 and Sat the 27th. Do you need directions? I hope to see you there. Ed Fillion, Deerfield River Laser, West
      Message 2 of 27 , Sep 23, 2007
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        Hi Bill,

        The Mid-Hudson meet is Friday Oct 26 and Sat the 27th. Do you need directions? I hope to see you there.

        Ed Fillion, Deerfield River Laser, West Springfield, MA

        william cole <billcwithonec@...> wrote:

        >looking for dates (links???) for the Whitman (MA) 2
        >foot meet and the Mid-Hudson Maxi Meet (NY)
        >Thanx.
        >Bill
        >
        >Bc
        >
        >LOandS@yahoogroups.com
        >~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
        >"...Tis the set of the sail and not the gale
        >Which determines the way they go. ...."
        >-EWW
        >~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
        >70x7, Matthew 18:21-22
        >~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
        >http://www.aflcio.org/corporatewatch/paywatch/ceou/database.cfm#S
        >
      • jdevos99@aol.com
        Strong depot, I assume you mean the 1900 depot, was similar to the Phillips depot before the later was lengthened. One newspaper reported that Strong was two
        Message 3 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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          Strong depot, I assume you mean the 1900 depot, was similar to the Phillips depot before the later was lengthened. One newspaper reported that Strong was two feet longer than the 1900 Phillips depot (before it was lengthened). Another reported that it was the "same size." The interior of the Phillips depot station is described in the newspapers - the Strong depot is not described to the best of my knowledge. I can provide room descriptions of Phillips but not the layout or sizes of the rooms. The existing depot in Phillips has been substantially modified on the interior and probably is not of much use for the modeler.
           
          Jerry DeVos




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        • DAVID PROVAN
          Thanks Jerry and everyone else who replied. I am interested in a typical layout in the absence of specific details. With nothing inside the building it looks
          Message 4 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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            Thanks Jerry and everyone else who replied. I am interested in a "typical" layout in the absence of specific details. With nothing inside the building it looks very bare.
             
            David

            jdevos99@... wrote:
            Strong depot, I assume you mean the 1900 depot, was similar to the Phillips depot before the later was lengthened. One newspaper reported that Strong was two feet longer than the 1900 Phillips depot (before it was lengthened). Another reported that it was the "same size." The interior of the Phillips depot station is described in the newspapers - the Strong depot is not described to the best of my knowledge. I can provide room descriptions of Phillips but not the layout or sizes of the rooms. The existing depot in Phillips has been substantially modified on the interior and probably is not of much use for the modeler.
             
            Jerry DeVos




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          • Trevor Marshall
            ... Hi David: While none of this is based on the real Strong station, if you re looking for a simple yet plausible interior I would suggest you do the
            Message 5 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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              On Sep 24, 2007, at 9:51 AM, DAVID PROVAN wrote:
              Thanks Jerry and everyone else who replied. I am interested in a "typical" layout in the absence of specific details. With nothing inside the building it looks very bare.
               
              David

              Hi David:

              While none of this is based on the real Strong station, if you're looking for a simple yet plausible interior I would suggest you do the following.

              Look at where the chimneys are on the roof of the Strong depot. That's where the interior walls should be, because those brick chimney tops imply a brick chimney underneath. So, add some partitions at each end, under the chimneys, to create three rooms.

              The center room is your waiting room, so make it nice with some wood wainscoting up to chair-rail height. The walls above can be lath'n'plaster (use sheet styrene and you've got it.

              You'll need to add some waiting benches, overhead lamps, etc., to this room.

              The room with the bay windows is the station agent's office. It'll need desks, filing cabinets, a ticket window on the wall between the office and waiting room, and so on. Also, a telephone, possibly a safe (to secure the receipts from tickets and express parcels) and so on. If you google "depot interior" you may get some ideas for this.

              The third room - with the freight doors - is the (wait for it!) freight room! It does not need a door between it and the waiting room. It can also have exposed framing on the interior walls. You'll want a scale to weigh express packages.

              I'd put a good wooden floor down in all three rooms.

              The waiting room and office should each have a coal or wood stove. These do not need to be against the wall - they can be in the middle of each room - with the metal chimney going from stove up to near the ceiling, then over to the wall where the brick chimney would be.

              You'll need someplace to keep the coal/wood - either a small bin inside the freight house, or a pile of wood outside the station, or a small coal bin outside the station.

              As I said earlier, NONE of this is based on what was actually in the Strong station - I'm just suggesting what I would expect to find in ANY station of the period.

              There are many sources for typical station details in O. Builders In Scale offers nice white metal castings for tables, chairs, safes, telephones, filing cabinets and other goodies you might expect to find inside an agent's office. Another good place to start would be Western Scale Models, which offers an office interior for a stamp mill. You can find both of these via Google.

              Cheers!

              - Trevor in Toronto

              Visit my Somerset & Piscataquis Counties Railroad
              - a freelanced Maine two-footer in O scale -


            • DAVID PROVAN
              Thanks Trevor, Lots of ideas there. I found a couple of pictures of depot interiors in The Last Steam Railroad in America and a very complete description of
              Message 6 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                Thanks Trevor,
                 
                Lots of ideas there. I found a couple of pictures of depot interiors in The Last Steam Railroad in America and a very complete description of Fairlee Vt. depot on the B&M on Google.
                 
                Under the agent's end partition wall there is a door opening so there would be no support for the chimney.I seem to recall that a stove could be fitted between both rooms so that is what I will probably do. I presume there would be no stove in the baggage end(?) but it doesn't matter anyway as I have fixed the doors closed. On the other hand, maybe there would be a stove in each of the three compartments, otherwise why have two chimneys?
                 
                Regards
                 
                David
                 
                 

                Trevor Marshall <tpmarshall@...> wrote:
                On Sep 24, 2007, at 9:51 AM, DAVID PROVAN wrote:
                Thanks Jerry and everyone else who replied. I am interested in a "typical" layout in the absence of specific details. With nothing inside the building it looks very bare.
                 
                David

                Hi David:

                While none of this is based on the real Strong station, if you're looking for a simple yet plausible interior I would suggest you do the following.

                Look at where the chimneys are on the roof of the Strong depot. That's where the interior walls should be, because those brick chimney tops imply a brick chimney underneath. So, add some partitions at each end, under the chimneys, to create three rooms.

                The center room is your waiting room, so make it nice with some wood wainscoting up to chair-rail height. The walls above can be lath'n'plaster (use sheet styrene and you've got it.

                You'll need to add some waiting benches, overhead lamps, etc., to this room.

                The room with the bay windows is the station agent's office. It'll need desks, filing cabinets, a ticket window on the wall between the office and waiting room, and so on. Also, a telephone, possibly a safe (to secure the receipts from tickets and express parcels) and so on. If you google "depot interior" you may get some ideas for this.

                The third room - with the freight doors - is the (wait for it!) freight room! It does not need a door between it and the waiting room. It can also have exposed framing on the interior walls. You'll want a scale to weigh express packages.

                I'd put a good wooden floor down in all three rooms.

                The waiting room and office should each have a coal or wood stove. These do not need to be against the wall - they can be in the middle of each room - with the metal chimney going from stove up to near the ceiling, then over to the wall where the brick chimney would be.

                You'll need someplace to keep the coal/wood - either a small bin inside the freight house, or a pile of wood outside the station, or a small coal bin outside the station.

                As I said earlier, NONE of this is based on what was actually in the Strong station - I'm just suggesting what I would expect to find in ANY station of the period.

                There are many sources for typical station details in O. Builders In Scale offers nice white metal castings for tables, chairs, safes, telephones, filing cabinets and other goodies you might expect to find inside an agent's office. Another good place to start would be Western Scale Models, which offers an office interior for a stamp mill. You can find both of these via Google.

                Cheers!

                - Trevor in Toronto

                Visit my Somerset & Piscataquis Counties Railroad
                - a freelanced Maine two-footer in O scale -



              • terry smith
                There was an article in Model Railroader about painting Strong station which showed an interior that the guy had modeled. And an exterior brick chimney does
                Message 7 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                  There was an article in Model Railroader about painting Strong station which showed an interior that the guy had modeled.

                   

                  And an exterior brick chimney does not necessarily mean that it goes down to the ground inside the building. I’m sure that I’ve seen pictures where the brickwork stops/starts (depending on which way you look at it) on the horizontal members of a roof truss, with a metal stovepipe beneath,

                   

                   

                  Terry2foot

                   

                   

                • usairman737
                  The best I could do on interior colors was to take photos of the current Bar Mills version of the Strong depot last month during Art s tour. If that is
                  Message 8 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                    The best I could do on interior colors was to take photos of the
                    current Bar Mills version of the Strong depot last month during Art's
                    tour. If that is phototypical, and I believe it is very close, try
                    waynescoating (spelling?) with 2" decorative vertical "car siding"
                    boards to about 36" up from the floor, with a cap rail on top. All
                    this painted white at Art's depot. Solid "plaster wall" surface above
                    that in a light shade of cream. Dark brown door trim on all interior
                    doors and around the ceiling, maybe varnished wood on the original.


                    Don't know if this is "authentic", but it looks attractive. I'd expect
                    nothing less from Art. On my own On2 Strong depot, I'll probably use
                    dark natural wood instead of the white for the lower part of the
                    interior, as I've seen that on existing restored MEC depots in Maine.


                    Gerry Cole, modeling Maine in Colorado
                  • terry smith
                    try waynescoating (spelling?), it s wainscoting Terry2foot
                    Message 9 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                      try waynescoating (spelling?),

                      it’s wainscoting

                      Terry2foot

                       

                       

                    • DAVID PROVAN
                      Thanks Jerry, I had come to a similar conclusion regarding the colours. Wainscoting to about 3 from the floor and doors/door trim dark varnished wood above
                      Message 10 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                        Thanks Jerry,
                         
                        I had come to a similar conclusion regarding the colours. Wainscoting to about 3' from the floor and doors/door trim dark varnished wood above that cream/off-white either horizontal boarding or plaster. I wonder if the Maine winters would mean all timber interiors.
                         
                        Either way to make life easy I was planning to use coloured paper for the walls - off-white overlaid with brown printed on the computer with very fine black lines to represent the vertical boards. Some painted stripwood for the belt-rail. All backed up with aluminium foil to block out the light. To my mind nothing looks worse than internal lights shining through the siding on models.
                         
                        I wonder if I am nearer to Maine than you are, Jerry.
                         
                        Regards
                         
                        David

                        usairman737 <usairman737@...> wrote:
                        The best I could do on interior colors was to take photos of the
                        current Bar Mills version of the Strong depot last month during Art's
                        tour. If that is phototypical, and I believe it is very close, try
                        waynescoating (spelling?) with 2" decorative vertical "car siding"
                        boards to about 36" up from the floor, with a cap rail on top. All
                        this painted white at Art's depot. Solid "plaster wall" surface above
                        that in a light shade of cream. Dark brown door trim on all interior
                        doors and around the ceiling, maybe varnished wood on the original.

                        Don't know if this is "authentic", but it looks attractive. I'd expect
                        nothing less from Art. On my own On2 Strong depot, I'll probably use
                        dark natural wood instead of the white for the lower part of the
                        interior, as I've seen that on existing restored MEC depots in Maine.

                        Gerry Cole, modeling Maine in Colorado


                      • DAVID PROVAN
                        Hi Terry, Good point about the chimneys. I think this shows where US practice differs from the UK. I can t recall ever seeing chimneys propped up on rafters
                        Message 11 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                          Hi Terry,
                           
                          Good point about the chimneys. I think this shows where US practice differs from the UK. I can't recall ever seeing chimneys propped up on rafters over here.
                           
                          I gave up reading MR when Linn Westcott died.
                           
                          David

                          terry smith <terry@...> wrote:
                          There was an article in Model Railroader about painting Strong station which showed an interior that the guy had modeled.
                           
                          And an exterior brick chimney does not necessarily mean that it goes down to the ground inside the building. I’m sure that I’ve seen pictures where the brickwork stops/starts (depending on which way you look at it) on the horizontal members of a roof truss, with a metal stovepipe beneath,
                           
                           
                          Terry2foot
                           
                           

                        • Jim
                          It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the Phillips and Strong
                          Message 12 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                            It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the Phillips and Strong chimneys.   I'm not going to say that it didn't happen, in fact I bet it does happen nowadays when it's really for decorative purposes, but in 40 or so years of being in houses of all types and ages in New England I've never seen one that did not go from floor (usually basement floor but these stations didn't have basements) to roof. Metal pipes ran to the chimneys from each room that had a stove. The pipes usually go in a few feet above the stove but well below the ceiling to protect the ceiling and/or rafters. If a pipe entered a chimney  in the rafters it would create the fire risk that the chimney was intended to prevent since the hot pipe would need to pass around the rafters holding up the chimney, and if it avoided that risk it might as well have just been put directly through the roof.  The heat from a stove  dissipates as it goes up the pipe and  chimney. The hottest sections are the lowest sections where the stove pipe goes into the brick and just above. You need the brick there much more than at the roof line.   -Jim 

                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: DAVID PROVAN <david.provan@...>
                            To: MaineTwoFooters@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 4:09:10 PM
                            Subject: RE: [MaineTwoFooters] Strong Station

                            Hi Terry,
                             
                            Good point about the chimneys. I think this shows where US practice differs from the UK. I can't recall ever seeing chimneys propped up on rafters over here.
                             
                            I gave up reading MR when Linn Westcott died.
                             
                            David

                            terry smith <terry@...> wrote:
                            There was an article in Model Railroader about painting Strong station which showed an interior that the guy had modeled.
                             
                            And an exterior brick chimney does not necessarily mean that it goes down to the ground inside the building. I’m sure that I’ve seen pictures where the brickwork stops/starts (depending on which way you look at it) on the horizontal members of a roof truss, with a metal stovepipe beneath,
                             
                             
                            Terry2foot
                             
                             




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                          • Trevor Marshall
                            Hi Jim: Excellent points - thanks! - Trevor ... Visit my Somerset & Piscataquis Counties Railroad - a freelanced Maine two-footer in O scale -
                            Message 13 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                              Hi Jim:

                              Excellent points - thanks!

                              - Trevor

                              On Sep 24, 2007, at 7:54 PM, Jim wrote:

                              It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the Phillips and Strong chimneys.  





                              Visit my Somerset & Piscataquis Counties Railroad
                              - a freelanced Maine two-footer in O scale -


                            • fjknight
                              While I m not an expert on chimney practices in New England the first house I bought in Maine had a chimney like none I d never seen before. It was a cape with
                              Message 14 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                                While I'm not an expert on chimney practices in New England the first
                                house I bought in Maine had a chimney like none I'd never seen before.
                                It was a cape with a chimney that started on blocking between 2 studs
                                in the living room and went up through the second floor. Once up into
                                the attic it was corbeled over about 1.5' to reach the centerline of
                                the house and was supported by rafters and the ridge beam. This was a
                                single layer unlined chimney and this house was heated primarily with
                                a wood stove venting through this chimney. We were afraid to use the
                                chimney so we removed it and when we did you could see that the
                                rafters and ridge beam had been blackened from the heat but I don't
                                think they burned because the flashing leaked enough to keep them
                                damp. This was slate roofed house so no chance of the roofing catching
                                on fire.

                                I wouldn't doubt that such structure supported chimneys were common in
                                rural Maine in the late 1800s when it was built.

                                Frank

                                --- In MaineTwoFooters@yahoogroups.com, Jim <red_gate_rover@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on
                                rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the
                                Phillips and Strong chimneys. I'm not going to say that it didn't
                                happen, in fact I bet it does happen nowadays when it's really for
                                decorative purposes, but in 40 or so years of being in houses of all
                                types and ages in New England I've never seen one that did not go from
                                floor (usually basement floor but these stations didn't have
                                basements) to roof. Metal pipes ran to the chimneys from each room
                                that had a stove. The pipes usually go in a few feet above the stove
                                but well below the ceiling to protect the ceiling and/or rafters. If a
                                pipe entered a chimney in the rafters it would create the fire risk
                                that the chimney was intended to prevent since the hot pipe would need
                                to pass around the rafters holding up the chimney, and if it avoided
                                that risk it might as well have just been put directly through the
                                roof. The heat
                                > from a stove dissipates as it goes up the pipe and chimney. The
                                hottest sections are the lowest sections where the stove pipe goes
                                into the brick and just above. You need the brick there much more than
                                at the roof line. -Jim
                                >
                              • LeeRainey@aol.com
                                In a message dated 9/24/2007 6:54:40 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... It is not New England, but I have seen this arrangement in several of the buildings at the
                                Message 15 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                                  In a message dated 9/24/2007 6:54:40 PM Eastern Standard Time, red_gate_rover@... writes:


                                  It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the Phillips and Strong chimneys.   I'm not going to say that it didn't happen


                                  It is not New England, but I have seen this arrangement in several of the buildings at the East Broad Top. The chimnies were not exactly on rafters, but on platforms built out from the wall, with holes to receive the stove pipe. These buildings were smaller than the Strong depot, but in one case not much smaller.

                                  Lee Rainey



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                                • terry smith
                                  It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the Phillips and Strong
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Sep 24, 2007
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                                    It would be very uncommon to see a brick chimney propped up on rafters in New England too, especially one with the dimensions of the Phillips and Strong chimneys.   I'm not going to say that it didn't happen



                                    It is not
                                    New England, but I have seen this arrangement in several of the buildings at the East Broad Top. The chimnies were not exactly on rafters, but on platforms built out from the wall, with holes to receive the stove pipe.

                                     

                                    As I have traveled fairly extensively around various parts of the US, including the New England area (a lot), Ohio, Pennsylvania, the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest, and have interests in historic buildings, maritime and narrow gauge railroads, then it is hard for me to say where I did see this feature. I have visited the EBT along my travels.

                                     

                                    My photographs will come to hand someday, probably during the winter

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                    Terry2foot

                                     

                                     

                                        

                                  • Jim
                                    OK, So they existed. Perhaps even were common, although we d have to qualify that with percentages. But yours did start on the main floor and not in the
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Sep 25, 2007
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                                      OK, So they existed. Perhaps even were common, although we'd have to qualify that with percentages. But yours did start on the main floor and not in the attic as was suggested. The chimney on my old house also took a jog of about 18 inches from center of the house to the side to avoid breaking the structural integrity of the ridge. The fire damage you found in your house would be the primary reason that Strong did not have such an arrangement since the practice then would be for there to have been multuple stoves connected to the chimney. Also, take a look at the amount of brick that is above the ridge line. It's about 4 or more feet of double courses, times two chimneys. Anyone a structural engineer on this list that can tell us how much framework would be needed to hold up that much chimney at the ceiling level? In model railroading we all to often see one-offs becoming common. Just because something could have been does not mean it was.
                                      Let's dig deeper to figure out what the prototype had. I spent an hour this morning looking through my books and photos of strong but did not find what I wanted. There are photos of Strong Depot being dismantled. I couldn't locate those photos in my short search but I'm sure that I have them in a readily available book or CD. Does this jog anyone's memory? Anyone else have access to those photos? -Jim


                                      ----- Original Message ----
                                      From: fjknight <frank.me2ft@...>
                                      To: MaineTwoFooters@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 9:18:12 PM
                                      Subject: [MaineTwoFooters] Re: Strong Station


                                      While I'm not an expert on chimney practices in New England the first
                                      house I bought in Maine had a chimney like none I'd never seen before.
                                      It was a cape with a chimney that started on blocking between 2 studs
                                      in the living room and went up through the second floor. Once up into
                                      the attic it was corbeled over about 1.5' to reach the centerline of
                                      the house and was supported by rafters and the ridge beam. This was a
                                      single layer unlined chimney and this house was heated primarily with
                                      a wood stove venting through this chimney. We were afraid to use the
                                      chimney so we removed it and when we did you could see that the
                                      rafters and ridge beam had been blackened from the heat but I don't
                                      think they burned because the flashing leaked enough to keep them
                                      damp. This was slate roofed house so no chance of the roofing catching
                                      on fire.

                                      I wouldn't doubt that such structure supported chimneys were common in
                                      rural Maine in the late 1800s when it was built.

                                      Frank



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                                    • Glenn Christensen
                                      Hi, I ve seen brick chimneys suspended above the floor on two period depots: Albion depot on the WW&F and Saltillo depot on the EB&T. In neither case were
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Sep 26, 2007
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                                        Hi,

                                        I've seen brick chimneys suspended above the floor on two period
                                        depots: Albion depot on the WW&F and Saltillo depot on the EB&T. In
                                        neither case were they up in the rafters however. In both cases
                                        they were suspended a couple of feet off the floor on platforms
                                        directly attached to the studs and kept horizontal by means of angle
                                        braces (attached to the same studs). My understanding is that
                                        reducing costs was the motivation for the building practice,
                                        although how much money they could have saved is arguable. I also
                                        understand the practice was somewhat common, although how common I
                                        have no way of telling.

                                        I have not been inside the Phillips station yet, but I understand
                                        that both stations as originally built were virtually identical.
                                        Perhaps someone else can say.


                                        Best Regards,
                                        Glenn

                                        --- In MaineTwoFooters@yahoogroups.com, Jim <red_gate_rover@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        >
                                        > OK, So they existed. Perhaps even were common, although we'd
                                        have to qualify that with percentages. But yours did start on the
                                        main floor and not in the attic as was suggested. The chimney on my
                                        old house also took a jog of about 18 inches from center of the
                                        house to the side to avoid breaking the structural integrity of the
                                        ridge. The fire damage you found in your house would be the primary
                                        reason that Strong did not have such an arrangement since the
                                        practice then would be for there to have been multuple stoves
                                        connected to the chimney. Also, take a look at the amount of brick
                                        that is above the ridge line. It's about 4 or more feet of double
                                        courses, times two chimneys. Anyone a structural engineer on this
                                        list that can tell us how much framework would be needed to hold up
                                        that much chimney at the ceiling level? In model railroading we
                                        all to often see one-offs becoming common. Just because something
                                        could have been does not mean it was.
                                        > Let's dig deeper to figure out what the prototype had. I spent
                                        an hour this morning looking through my books and photos of strong
                                        but did not find what I wanted. There are photos of Strong Depot
                                        being dismantled. I couldn't locate those photos in my short search
                                        but I'm sure that I have them in a readily available book or CD.
                                        Does this jog anyone's memory? Anyone else have access to those
                                        photos? -Jim
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > ----- Original Message ----
                                        > From: fjknight <frank.me2ft@...>
                                        > To: MaineTwoFooters@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Sent: Monday, September 24, 2007 9:18:12 PM
                                        > Subject: [MaineTwoFooters] Re: Strong Station
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > While I'm not an expert on chimney practices in New England the
                                        first
                                        > house I bought in Maine had a chimney like none I'd never seen
                                        before.
                                        > It was a cape with a chimney that started on blocking between 2
                                        studs
                                        > in the living room and went up through the second floor. Once up
                                        into
                                        > the attic it was corbeled over about 1.5' to reach the centerline
                                        of
                                        > the house and was supported by rafters and the ridge beam. This
                                        was a
                                        > single layer unlined chimney and this house was heated primarily
                                        with
                                        > a wood stove venting through this chimney. We were afraid to use
                                        the
                                        > chimney so we removed it and when we did you could see that the
                                        > rafters and ridge beam had been blackened from the heat but I don't
                                        > think they burned because the flashing leaked enough to keep them
                                        > damp. This was slate roofed house so no chance of the roofing
                                        catching
                                        > on fire.
                                        >
                                        > I wouldn't doubt that such structure supported chimneys were
                                        common in
                                        > rural Maine in the late 1800s when it was built.
                                        >
                                        > Frank
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
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