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Bridgton loco no 7 in the year 1919

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  • Andycoward@aol.com
    hi As a UK fan of the Maine 2 footers I have been lucky enough to obtain a set of documents relating to Bridgton and Saco river loco no 7. These 12 sheets are
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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      hi

      As a UK fan of the Maine 2 footers I have been lucky enough to obtain a set
      of documents relating to Bridgton and Saco river loco no 7.
      These 12 sheets are headed "annual" and "monthly loco inspection and repair
      report" for the whole of the year 1919.

      I am intrested to know more about these and how they were used.Bear in mind
      that i am a UK fan and only used to the practices over here.
      They also seem to state that the loco was "out of service " for the period
      Jan 30 to the issue of a report dated May 27th.
      This seems a long period at a time when the line I understood was busy and I
      wonder if there is more to this. Was this as a result of an accident or was
      the loco just set aside for a while?

      Any explanation would be welcome

      Andrew
    • on2@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/1/2002 1:49:09 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... I have few of these myself. The B&H and B&SR had to [as all RR s have/had to do] inspect
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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        In a message dated 11/1/2002 1:49:09 PM Eastern Standard Time, Andycoward@... writes:


        hi

        As a UK fan of the Maine 2 footers I have been lucky enough to obtain a set
        of documents relating to Bridgton and Saco River loco no 7.
        These 12 sheets are headed "annual" and "monthly loco inspection and repair
        report" for the whole of the year 1919.

        I am interested to know more about these and how they were used. Bear in mind
        that I am a UK fan and only used to the practices over here.
        They also seem to state that the loco was "out of service " for the period
        Jan 30 to the issue of a report dated May 27th.
        This seems a long period at a time when the line I understood was busy and I
        wonder if there is more to this. Was this as a result of an accident or was
        the loco just set aside for a while?

        Any explanation would be welcome

        Andrew


        I have few of these myself.  The B&H and B&SR had to [as all RR's have/had to do] inspect their locomotives yearly and monthly.  The yearly inspection was a little more intense than the monthly one, as you can guess.  They had to keep on the property, a record of these inspections for insurance purposes and for surprise ICC inspections.  That's the simple explanation.  Anyone else agree/disagree?

        Steve
      • Andycoward@aol.com
        Steve They came with a holder ..............a wooden surround with a metal and glass insert. There are screwholes for fixing this but would it be to the loco
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 2, 2002
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          Steve

          They came with a holder ..............a wooden surround with a metal and
          glass insert.
          There are screwholes for fixing this but would it be to the loco or would
          they all be displayed in one place?

          thanks

          Andrew



          In a message dated 01/11/02 20:34:11 GMT Standard Time, on2@... writes:

          << I have few of these myself. The B&H and B&SR had to [as all RR's have/had
          to
          do] inspect their locomotives yearly and monthly. The yearly inspection was
          a little more intense than the monthly one, as you can guess. They had to
          keep on the property, a record of these inspections for insurance purposes
          and for surprise ICC inspections. That's the simple explanation. Anyone
          else agree/disagree?

          Steve >>
        • on2@aol.com
          In a message dated 11/2/2002 11:42:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Andrew, I m not sure what you have now. Can you scan it and send me a copy for a look see?
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 3, 2002
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            In a message dated 11/2/2002 11:42:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, Andycoward@... writes:


            Steve

            They came with a holder ..............a wooden surround with a metal and
            glass insert.
            There are screw holes for fixing this but would it be to the loco or would
            they all be displayed in one place?

            thanks

            Andrew

            Andrew,
            I'm not sure what you have now.  Can you scan it and send me a copy for a look see?  The locomotives had to be inspected by the proper authorities, and this could be an official permit for the operation of the locomotive.  I have monthly inspection reports that were performed by the RR's personnel.  You might have something that was supposed to be left in the office or on the locomotive for public display.
            Is the frame dirty with coal dust and grime, or has it been cleaned up?
            Steve
          • Keith Taylor
            Andy and Steve, Not only back in the time of the Two Footers, but even today, a certificate showing the dates and tests performed for a periodic inspection
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 3, 2002
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              Andy and Steve,
              Not only back in the time of the Two Footers, but even today, a certificate showing the dates and tests performed for a periodic inspection must be kept on display in the cab of every locomotive. Virtually all of them had a glass covered certificate that gave the builders dates and models and other imortant information. Then there would usually be a pocket like holder that would contain the enginers record of daily inspection, which he would sign off after having persoanlly inspected the locomotive. He was only relieved of this duty if he took the engine froma service area, where mechanical forces were on duty. And even then, the daily inspection card would have to be signed by the machinist that made the inspection. What better system could you have to keep track of a locomotives inspection record, that to have a copy of it right up on the engine! If there was an accident or any sort of reportable incident, the ICC Inspector or Railroad official could instantly see when the locomotive was last tested for compliance. I can't say for what time before, but this procedure was mandated by the "Power Boiler Act" of 1919 and is in fact, still in force today! This is the legislation that requires that every locomotive be inspected and that ALL appliances it is equipped with, are in working order. Having a whistle doesn't mean beans if you can't blow it!
              Keith Taylor- (retired locomotive engineer  Lehigh Valley RR & Conrail)
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: on2@...
              Sent: Sunday, November 03, 2002 7:14 AM
              Subject: Re: [MaineTwoFooters] Bridgton loco no 7 in the year 1919

              In a message dated 11/2/2002 11:42:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, Andycoward@... writes:


              Steve

              They came with a holder ..............a wooden surround with a metal and
              glass insert.
              There are screw holes for fixing this but would it be to the loco or would
              they all be displayed in one place?

              thanks

              Andrew

              Andrew,
              I'm not sure what you have now.  Can you scan it and send me a copy for a look see?  The locomotives had to be inspected by the proper authorities, and this could be an official permit for the operation of the locomotive.  I have monthly inspection reports that were performed by the RR's personnel.  You might have something that was supposed to be left in the office or on the locomotive for public display.
              Is the frame dirty with coal dust and grime, or has it been cleaned up?
              Steve

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            • SWEEP
              Just to add a little more info. That certificate is now days called a blue card as it is a blue colored form. It shows information on 92 day inspection and
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 3, 2002
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                Just to add a little more info.


                That certificate is now days called a "blue card" as it is a blue colored
                form. It shows information on
                92 day inspection and bi-annual inspection as required by the Federal
                Railroad Administration. Each of the two inspections covers different
                components of the locomotive such as running gear, brake valves etc.
                Working as a locomotive engineer on a shortline I used to help the master
                mechanic perform these
                inspections.

                Also, the engineer must fill out and turn in a report that list any defects
                that may arise while the engine
                is is being operated.

                James
              • Keith Taylor
                ... From: SWEEP ... colored ... James, Just goes to show you that nothing stayes the same!! The Blue Card is now a 92 day inspection??
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 3, 2002
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                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "SWEEP" <sweep@...>


                  > That certificate is now days called a "blue card" as it is a blue
                  colored
                  > form. It shows information on
                  > 92 day inspection and bi-annual inspection as required by the Federal
                  > Railroad Administration.
                  James,
                  Just goes to show you that nothing stayes the same!! The "Blue Card" is
                  now a 92 day inspection?? We always refered to it as the M.I. date,being
                  a short form of "Monthly Inspection." You always checked to see if the
                  M.I. was "in date." The bi-annual inspections were not donw at the local
                  roundhouse, butwhere sent to the Railroads main shops incase a major
                  overhaul was called for! (In my case, they were sent to Sayre, Penna.
                  for the major inspections and repairs or overhauls ) I believe, bit
                  ccould be remebering wrong, but I think the six minth inspections stared
                  as a way to standardize the boiler washes.
                  Keith Taylor
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