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Tips for researching cemteries Part 1 & 2

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  • susan d szewczyk
    Hi List, I hope you find this interesting. Will post part 3 and 4 later. Sue Tips for researching cemetery records: Parts I & II Records of burials, grave
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 2, 1999
      Hi List,
      I hope you find this interesting. Will post part 3 and 4 later.
      Sue


      Tips for researching cemetery records: Parts I & II

      Records of burials, grave sites and tombstone inscriptions are often
      obtainable from cemetery custodians. These custodians may be sextons,
      county officials, township officers, city employees, town officials,
      church officers, mortuary personnel, or private cemetery staff members.
      Various types of records may be kept: burial registers, plot maps, plot
      deeds, burial permits, and biographical cards.

      In some cases the cemetery files will contain details on the persons
      buried there. In other cases, only the name, date and site of the burial
      will be recorded. If the name and location of the cemetery is known, you
      should send them a SASE and inquiry addressed to the custodian asking
      about your ancestor. Address of many cemeteries in the US can be found in
      the following books:

      1.Cemeteries of the US, by Gald Research Co Detroit, MI latest edition
      over 22,600 cemeteries.

      2.International Cemetery Directory, American Cemetery Association,
      Columbus OH latest edition.

      If the cemetery is unknown or if you are unable to locate a custodian or
      if you do not receive a response send a SASE and inquiry to the nearest
      local genealogical society. Give them details about your ancestor, and
      ask them about cemeteries in the region, cemetery records (typescript,
      published, manuscript, genealogical periodicals), custodians and search
      costs.

      Your second set of searches should be made at the nearest Family History
      Center, which is a branch of the family history Library in Salt Lake
      City, UT. The Family library has microfilm copies of a large number of
      typescripts and published cemetery records. At the Family History Center,
      ask for the locality section of the family history library catalog, which
      is on microfiche and computer. You want the section, which pertains to
      your ancestors' state. Move in them to you ancestor's county, then look
      for cemetery records. Should you find that records are available and if
      they look promising, have the attendant borrow them from the Library for
      you.

      More later,
      Sue
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