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  • MagicalWordsBetas@yahoogroups.com
    MW Betas Rules 1. Politeness: Be courteous and positive in all things. This shouldn’t have to be mentioned, but sometimes it gets ignored. We’re all
    Message 1 of 133 , Mar 17, 2013
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      MW Betas Rules

      1. Politeness: Be courteous and positive in all things. This shouldn�t have to be mentioned, but sometimes it gets ignored. We�re all here to learn and become better in our chosen craft, not give scathing reviews. Give the critique that you would like to receive. (NOTE: If you feel you have been given a cruel or unkind critique, you may write offline to the group owner, faith@... and she will assist with the situation. This will hopefully keep anything from escalating.)

      2. Introduction: Please add a brief introduction in the Database section for Members so that others know who you are, your writing focus, etc. Tell us about yourselves.

      3. Uploading: Create a folder in the Files section with your Name (Pen Name, Handle, etc), and create two folders within that, one for your submissions and one for completed critiques. Add your submission(s) in your submissions folder, preferably with subfolders for each novel or full Short Story, appropriately named and with a brief description.

      4. Synopsis: A brief synopsis should be uploaded for the submission if available. If one is not available, you should at least add a brief explanation of what�s going on in the story up to the point of the submitted portion. Writing a synopsis can actually be good practice to help sharpen your skills regardless and may even help find weaker story points.

      5. Documents for Critique: Upload MS Word in DOC or RTF format, up to 5000 words (or one chapter if it�s not too long) in either 12 point Times New Roman or Courier New. Also add your Name (Pen Name/Internet Handle), Abbreviated Title, and Approximate Word Count in the header. Name your file with �Title_Chapter # (or the word �Short� if a short story)_Author. Those giving critiques should rename the file, adding their name at the end of the file name (e.g. Title_Chapter #_Author_Critiquer) and use Track Changes in MS Word for editorial comments. You can find it in the Tools menu of MS Word. You can view a video tutorial for Track Changes here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfrd_YcBdak

      6. Document Description: Please add a brief note for the submission in the description section if you are looking for specific critique areas (punctuation, dialogue help, etc) and also add word count and genre. If no specific focus requests are added, assume a full critique.

      7. Drafts: If submitting an unfinished draft, include the term WIP or Rough . Otherwise, tell us which draft you�re submitting, Finished First Draft, Finished Second Draft, etc.

      8. Content: If you are submitting a project with adult content, please add, Adult Content or Strong Romantic Elements in the document description. Likewise, if your project has graphic violence, add Graphic Violence or some other disclaimer in the description.

      9. Database: Enter your work for critique in the Database section. Likewise, upon finishing a critique, place the finished critique in the appropriate folder and add your name to the Database under the appropriate section.

      10. Critique: Please try to critique at least two works for each one of your own that you post. This may not always be possible based on subject matter, genre, or style, but doing so helps keep things moving.

      11. Please read Faith Hunter�s guide to Critique Groups below for an idea of how to critique someone�s work.

      12. If you need help with any of these rules just ask and someone here will be happy to assist.

      And the last rule, have fun and happy posting!



      Critique Groups
      Can take a talented writer to the next step or level of writing, teaching
      writing technique the slow old fashioned way -- by trial and error. Why bother
      when one can take an expensive writing course and get it all at once? Because
      the human mind learns best by doing. By seeing the changes taking place on
      paper and in the story.

      WHAT ELEMENTS MAKE THE BEST CRITIQUE GROUPS?
      1. Establish the types of writing you will accept. If someone wants to post something else
      it is not to be allowed.
      2. Find a published writer in the area and ask him/her to join the group and drop
      in occasionally.
      3. Establish the format of pieces to be critiqued (word count, font size, double
      spaced, word for windows, word perfect, etc.)
      4. Start with a fairly strong emphasis on READING and a methodology of critique.
      Then allow it to evolve, noting that you may have to return to the more formal
      format.
      5. Work to keep it non-cliquish. This establishes good will. Groups that
      become cliquish loose an edge and tend to die off. Learn your member's
      strengths. One may do REALLY great logic, finding holes in plot, one may do
      GREAT description, etc.
      6. Remember to praise FIRST, then start bleeding all over the manuscript. (Note: This does not mean trash the work. There�s bleeding and there�s cutting. A good reviewer/critic can balance the good elements with the bad and give positive advice on how to solve the problem.)
      7. Look for macro and micro elements to critique:

      MACRO ELEMENTS TO CRITIQUE, in no particular order:
      a. Genre and commercial points. Silly Example: cursing in young adult or
      children's books is a no-no!
      b. Dialogue and dialect
      c. Point of View
      d. A strong beginning
      e. Character strengths and weaknesses
      f. Transitions
      g. Five senses
      h. Voices : character's mental voice and narrator's voice
      i. Tone Setting and Grounding : keeping reader in place and aware of time
      passage
      j. Factual details
      k. Stage direction (body movements)

      MICRO ELEMENTS
      a. spelling
      b. punctuation
      c. paragraph creation
      d. etc.

      PURPOSE OF A CRITIQUE GROUP IS NOT:
      NOT to make you feel better about your wonderful writing talent
      NOT to offer uniform praise or condemnation or repay a difficult critique you
      were given

      PURPOSE OF A CRITIQUE GROUP IS:
      IS to find the BIG errors that we, as writers, miss
      IS to point the writer to a more publishable style or subject matter, etc.
      IS to find factual mistakes in text
      IS to offer praise where the writer has shown improvement.
    • MagicalWordsBetas@yahoogroups.com
      MW Betas Rules 1. Politeness: Be courteous and positive in all things. This shouldnÆt have to be mentioned, but sometimes it gets ignored. WeÆre all
      Message 133 of 133 , Aug 2 3:46 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        MW Betas Rules

        1. Politeness: Be courteous and positive in all things. This shouldn�t have to be mentioned, but sometimes it gets ignored. We�re all here to learn and become better in our chosen craft, not give scathing reviews. Give the critique that you would like to receive. (NOTE: If you feel you have been given a cruel or unkind critique, you may write offline to the group owner, faith@... and she will assist with the situation. This will hopefully keep anything from escalating.)

        2. Introduction: Please add a brief introduction in the Database section for Members so that others know who you are, your writing focus, etc. Tell us about yourselves.

        3. Uploading: Create a folder in the Files section with your Name (Pen Name, Handle, etc), and create two folders within that, one for your submissions and one for completed critiques. Add your submission(s) in your submissions folder, preferably with subfolders for each novel or full Short Story, appropriately named and with a brief description.

        4. Synopsis: A brief synopsis should be uploaded for the submission if available. If one is not available, you should at least add a brief explanation of what�s going on in the story up to the point of the submitted portion. Writing a synopsis can actually be good practice to help sharpen your skills regardless and may even help find weaker story points.

        5. Documents for Critique: Upload MS Word in DOC or RTF format, up to 5000 words (or one chapter if it�s not too long) in either 12 point Times New Roman or Courier New. Also add your Name (Pen Name/Internet Handle), Abbreviated Title, and Approximate Word Count in the header. Name your file with �Title_Chapter # (or the word �Short� if a short story)_Author. Those giving critiques should rename the file, adding their name at the end of the file name (e.g. Title_Chapter #_Author_Critiquer) and use Track Changes in MS Word for editorial comments. You can find it in the Tools menu of MS Word. You can view a video tutorial for Track Changes here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfrd_YcBdak

        6. Document Description: Please add a brief note for the submission in the description section if you are looking for specific critique areas (punctuation, dialogue help, etc) and also add word count and genre. If no specific focus requests are added, assume a full critique.

        7. Drafts: If submitting an unfinished draft, include the term WIP or Rough . Otherwise, tell us which draft you�re submitting, Finished First Draft, Finished Second Draft, etc.

        8. Content: If you are submitting a project with adult content, please add, Adult Content or Strong Romantic Elements in the document description. Likewise, if your project has graphic violence, add Graphic Violence or some other disclaimer in the description.

        9. Database: Enter your work for critique in the Database section. Likewise, upon finishing a critique, place the finished critique in the appropriate folder and add your name to the Database under the appropriate section.

        10. Critique: Please try to critique at least two works for each one of your own that you post. This may not always be possible based on subject matter, genre, or style, but doing so helps keep things moving.

        11. Please read Faith Hunter�s guide to Critique Groups below for an idea of how to critique someone�s work.

        12. If you need help with any of these rules just ask and someone here will be happy to assist.

        And the last rule, have fun and happy posting!



        Critique Groups
        Can take a talented writer to the next step or level of writing, teaching
        writing technique the slow old fashioned way -- by trial and error. Why bother
        when one can take an expensive writing course and get it all at once? Because
        the human mind learns best by doing. By seeing the changes taking place on
        paper and in the story.

        WHAT ELEMENTS MAKE THE BEST CRITIQUE GROUPS?
        1. Establish the types of writing you will accept. If someone wants to post something else
        it is not to be allowed.
        2. Find a published writer in the area and ask him/her to join the group and drop
        in occasionally.
        3. Establish the format of pieces to be critiqued (word count, font size, double
        spaced, word for windows, word perfect, etc.)
        4. Start with a fairly strong emphasis on READING and a methodology of critique.
        Then allow it to evolve, noting that you may have to return to the more formal
        format.
        5. Work to keep it non-cliquish. This establishes good will. Groups that
        become cliquish loose an edge and tend to die off. Learn your member's
        strengths. One may do REALLY great logic, finding holes in plot, one may do
        GREAT description, etc.
        6. Remember to praise FIRST, then start bleeding all over the manuscript. (Note: This does not mean trash the work. There�s bleeding and there�s cutting. A good reviewer/critic can balance the good elements with the bad and give positive advice on how to solve the problem.)
        7. Look for macro and micro elements to critique:

        MACRO ELEMENTS TO CRITIQUE, in no particular order:
        a. Genre and commercial points. Silly Example: cursing in young adult or
        children's books is a no-no!
        b. Dialogue and dialect
        c. Point of View
        d. A strong beginning
        e. Character strengths and weaknesses
        f. Transitions
        g. Five senses
        h. Voices : character's mental voice and narrator's voice
        i. Tone Setting and Grounding : keeping reader in place and aware of time
        passage
        j. Factual details
        k. Stage direction (body movements)

        MICRO ELEMENTS
        a. spelling
        b. punctuation
        c. paragraph creation
        d. etc.

        PURPOSE OF A CRITIQUE GROUP IS NOT:
        NOT to make you feel better about your wonderful writing talent
        NOT to offer uniform praise or condemnation or repay a difficult critique you
        were given

        PURPOSE OF A CRITIQUE GROUP IS:
        IS to find the BIG errors that we, as writers, miss
        IS to point the writer to a more publishable style or subject matter, etc.
        IS to find factual mistakes in text
        IS to offer praise where the writer has shown improvement.
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