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Wright's Writing Corner

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  • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
    In Today s Post, I have finally returned to the subject of writing about the great ideas. Today s idea: Aristocracy. Come by and share your thoughts on your
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 22, 2013
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      In Today's Post, I have finally returned to the subject of writing about the great ideas. Today's idea: Aristocracy.
       
      Come by and share your thoughts on your favorite nobleman...hero or villain.
       
    • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
      Sorry everyone...wrong link. This is the right one: http://arhyalon.livejournal.com/278742.html#comments In Today s Post, I have finally returned to the
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 22, 2013
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        Sorry everyone...wrong link. This is the right one:
         

         
        In Today's Post, I have finally returned to the subject of writing about the great ideas. Today's idea: Aristocracy.
         
        Come by and share your thoughts on your favorite nobleman...hero or villain.
         
      • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
        Today s post is on: Writing for Boys, Writing for Girls. Come by and share your opinion on the similarities and differences between the literary likes of men
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 13, 2013
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          Today's post is on: Writing for Boys, Writing for Girls.
           
          Come by and share your opinion on the similarities and differences between the literary likes of men and women.
           
           
           
          Excerpt:
           

          When I was in college, some male friends and I (including the one I married) used to spend time talking about books we liked—science fiction and fantasy, mainly. I discovered that Ursula LeGuin was regarded as equal to the male authors, but all other female authors in the field were regarded as sentimental and of lower quality. Their books were soft and not as admired.

          I listened. I took careful note. I determined that I wanted to be like Ursula LeGuin—whose work I loved, not like those other women whose books did not qualify. Some of whose work I also loved—like Anne McCaffrey.

          It never occurred to me, not once, that the qualities the men did not like in the books might be considered a virtue by some female readers. I just thought women were mainly too sentimental to write real books, so I would have to learn to write like a man.

          When a guy friend told me that he could see signs of this womanish writing style in an early version of my Prospero series, I put the book aside and did not work on it again for about five years.

        • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
          Hey! Come on by to weigh in on angst and romance! When one hears people denigrating /Twilight/ and other books meant for teenage girls, one often hears the
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 11, 2013
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            Hey! Come on by to weigh in on angst and romance!


            When one hears people denigrating Twilight and other books meant for teenage girls, one often hears the complaint that such books are angst-ridden. This is often said as if being angst-ridden is a fault in and of itself.

             When I hear this, it reminds me of my theory that Twilight’s main vice is that it has spread beyond its intended readership. (Mind you, I haven’t read Twilight myself. I don’t like vampires for personal reasons. I am judging from the reactions of those who like it and of those who do not.)
             
            Because when it comes to teenage girls:

            Angst is not a bug, folks, it’s a feature!  

            Angst, heartbreak, is what we girls daydream about, especially back when we were tweens. When I was 12, I would lay in bed at night thinking of sadder and sadder romantic situations. I loved doing this. (Many of the tragic scenarios involved Captain Kirk or Spock or maybe Prince Caspian suffering a deadly wound or disease or some other heartbreakingly sad situation.) Eventually, I got so good at imagining heartbreaking scenarios I could make myself cry.

            Why? Why would a girl want to make herself cry? Well, why would a young man want to undergo the grueling discomfort of an adventure? Dare violence, endure explosions?




          • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
            Last night s Writing Workshop for Savvy Authors was great fun. Thanks to all those who came! I posted a bit of it, along with a link to the transcript, at:
            Message 5 of 18 , May 2 6:36 AM
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              Last night's Writing Workshop for Savvy Authors was great fun. Thanks to all those who came!

              I posted a bit of it, along with a link to the transcript, at: http://arhyalon.livejournal.com/287903.html

              The workshop was on my favorite of all writing techniques, The Trick:

              The Trick: Raising expectations in one direction but having the story first go in the opposite direction.

              The Trick is the secret to writing, the thing that makes a story work: expectation followed by something other than the expected outcome – but something that is thematically consistent with the original events.

              In art, artists use shading to emphasize the lighter portion of their work. The shading provides contrast that draws the eye back to the non-shaded part. In a story, writer’s need to do the same thing. One way of providing that contrast is with The Trick.

              Of all writing techniques, The Trick is the easiest to do. You just decide where you want the story to go, and then you indicate—through dialogue, character thought, or narration—that the opposite is coming. If you want to have a happy incident, you make your character glum. If you want something bad to happen, you make him unexpectedly happy. It is that simple, and it is tremendously effective.

              You just have to remember to use it. That is all.


            • Ronda
              well written! Saw the cover for your book in the link as well, I can see why you are happy with it. Ronda
              Message 6 of 18 , May 3 6:35 AM
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                well written! Saw the cover for your book in the link as well, I can see why you are happy with it.
                Ronda

                --- In MagicalWordsBetas@yahoogroups.com, "L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright" <lampwright@...> wrote:
                >
                > Last night's Writing Workshop for Savvy Authors was great fun. Thanks to
                > all those who came!
                >
                > I posted a bit of it, along with a link to the transcript, at:
                > http://arhyalon.livejournal.com/287903.html
                >
                > The workshop was on my favorite of all writing techniques, The Trick:
                >
                > The Trick: Raising expectations in one direction but having the story
                > first go in the opposite direction.
                >
                > The Trick is the secret to writing, the thing that makes a story work:
                > expectation followed by something other than the expected outcome -- but
                > something that is thematically consistent with the original events.
                >
                > In art, artists use shading to emphasize the lighter portion of their
                > work. The shading provides contrast that draws the eye back to the
                > non-shaded part. In a story, writer's need to do the same thing. One way
                > of providing that contrast is with The Trick.
                >
                > Of all writing techniques, The Trick is the easiest to do. You just
                > decide where you want the story to go, and then you indicate---through
                > dialogue, character thought, or narration---that the opposite is coming.
                > If you want to have a happy incident, you make your character glum. If
                > you want something bad to happen, you make him unexpectedly happy. It is
                > that simple, and it is tremendously effective.
                >
                > You just have to remember to use it. That is all.
                >
              • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
                Thanks!!
                Message 7 of 18 , May 3 11:04 AM
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                  Thanks!!

                  On 5/3/2013 9:35 AM, Ronda wrote:
                   

                  well written! Saw the cover for your book in the link as well, I can see why you are happy with it.
                  Ronda

                  --- In MagicalWordsBetas@yahoogroups.com, "L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright" <lampwright@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Last night's Writing Workshop for Savvy Authors was great fun. Thanks to
                  > all those who came!
                  >
                  > I posted a bit of it, along with a link to the transcript, at:
                  > http://arhyalon.livejournal.com/287903.html
                  >
                  > The workshop was on my favorite of all writing techniques, The Trick:
                  >
                  > The Trick: Raising expectations in one direction but having the story
                  > first go in the opposite direction.
                  >
                  > The Trick is the secret to writing, the thing that makes a story work:
                  > expectation followed by something other than the expected outcome -- but
                  > something that is thematically consistent with the original events.
                  >
                  > In art, artists use shading to emphasize the lighter portion of their
                  > work. The shading provides contrast that draws the eye back to the
                  > non-shaded part. In a story, writer's need to do the same thing. One way
                  > of providing that contrast is with The Trick.
                  >
                  > Of all writing techniques, The Trick is the easiest to do. You just
                  > decide where you want the story to go, and then you indicate---through
                  > dialogue, character thought, or narration---that the opposite is coming.
                  > If you want to have a happy incident, you make your character glum. If
                  > you want something bad to happen, you make him unexpectedly happy. It is
                  > that simple, and it is tremendously effective.
                  >
                  > You just have to remember to use it. That is all.
                  >


                • L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright
                  Hey! Here are the links for the last two Wright s Writing Corner, part one and two on the Payload Moment. Excerpt: /_Payload_: Every scene/fight/sex scene
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 7, 2014
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                     Hey!

                    Here are the links for the last two Wright's Writing Corner, part one and two on the Payload Moment.

                    Excerpt:

                    Payload:             Every scene/fight/sex scene should have some moment that moves the plot along or heightens awareness, drawing the reader into something greater. Villains should reveal something important during a fight, and romantic partners should learn more about each other or reveal secrets.

                    Also, every character should have at least one paragraph/scene where they reveal their inner motivation.

                     Payload. Probably the most important concept in these Writing Tips. If I had to rank them from most important to least important, this one would be number one.


                    Payload Part One:
                    http://www.ljagilamplighter.com/2014/03/26/wrights-writing-corner-payload-moment-reboot-part-one/

                    Payload Part Two:

                    http://www.ljagilamplighter.com/2014/04/02/wrights-writing-corner-the-most-important-techique/

                    Added bonus: article on Oreads and Gnomes at Mythical Mondays today
                    http://networkedblogs.com/VGvoU

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