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FW: How Will We Civil Rights History and Progress Not Yet Made?

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  • Kaleem Caire
    My message to Urban League leaders across the USA. From: Kaleem Caire Sent: Friday, January 11, 2013 6:59 AM To: AOE Subject: How Will We Civil Rights History
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 11, 2013
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      My message to Urban League leaders across the USA.

       

      From: Kaleem Caire
      Sent: Friday, January 11, 2013 6:59 AM
      To: AOE
      Subject: How Will We Civil Rights History and Progress Not Yet Made?

       

      January 11, 2013

       

      My Dear Brothers and Sisters:

       

      I hope this message finds each of you and your families doing well and enjoying the beginning of this commemorative New Year that marks of our freedom in the United States of America. For it was 150 years ago, on January 1, 1863, that President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, thereby giving most slaves in the United States legal freedom from physical bondage. Slavery was forever made illegal in all states with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment on December 6, 1865. Lest we remember the dreams and aspirations of the 4,441,630 black men, women and children who resided in the U.S. in 1860 – 89% were slaves; only 11% were free.

       

      Here we are, 150 years later, a tall and strong people who should be proud of or rise despite our setbacks. When I look in the mirror every morning, I am proud to be a part of a unique people, a transatlantic mixture of ethnicities anchored by ebony, standing on the broad shoulders of giants in history who worked tirelessly to give us life, liberty and the ability to pursue equality, justice and a quality life for our people, and others.

       

      As I prepare to gaze into the same mirror right now, I am curious to learn how we Urban Leaguers, whose agencies have survived somewhere up to 100-plus years to address the lingering whip-marks of slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and discrimination, will honor the progress we have made in this country and remind Americans that we still have so much further to go?

       

      How will we acknowledge the progress of 50 years since John F. Kennedy gave his famous and controversial speech on Civil Rights (click here) on June 11, 1963? When I listen to Kennedy rattle-off the statistics on the percentage of African Americans graduating from high school and attending college, I can’t bring myself to ignore the painful, steady erosion of significant educational and economic gains our people made from 1964 – 1994. You can watch the full video of his speech by clicking here and visiting The Miller Center website.

       

      And, how will we remember, celebrate and take account of the progress we’ve made (and have not made) since President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on that warm, quiet summer day in our nation’s capital on July 2, 1964? How will we ensure that our children, families and communities are aware of and understand these great moments in history, and develop the conviction to continue to build forward?

       

      What will the next 50 and 150 years look like for us, for our children and families, for or people, for our country and our world?

       

      How will you and I, and the institutions we’ve been blessed to lead, work to yield the outcomes we still need to achieve? How will we truly achieve our Long Road to Brown?

       

      Every day, I am mindful of the extraordinary preparation, courage, struggle and true patriotism of our elders, ancestors and those who sympathized with their quest for freedom. They overcame mighty barriers to ensure our generation, and the ones that follow, could prosper.

       

      But I ask myself one more question. What do we need to do now to regain the momentum we’ve have lost to secure equality of opportunity for all, and achieve the goals and desires of our ancestors that our brother, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., so eloquently expressed in “I Have A Dream”?

       

      I look forward to engaging in these moments with you, and creating them for our community here in Dane County, Wisconsin.

       

      With love, respect and admiration.

       

      Your brother in the Struggle.

       

      ONE DAY.

       

      Strengthening the Bridge Between Education and Work

       

      Kaleem Caire

      President & CEO

      Urban League of Greater Madison

      Main: 608.729.1200

      Assistant: 608.729.1249

      Fax: 608.729.1205

      www.ulgm.org

      www.madison-prep.org

      Invest in the Urban League

      Urban League 2012 Third Quarter Progress Report

       

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    • Victor M. Arellano
      A long road to Brown v Board of Education indeed will be...in all its plenitude!! Well said! Victor M. Arellano Arellano & Phebus, S.C. 1468 North High Point
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 14, 2013
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        A long road to Brown v Board of Education indeed will be………in all its plenitude!!

         

         

         

        Well said!

         

        Victor M. Arellano

        Arellano & Phebus, S.C.

        1468 North High Point Road, Suite 202

        Middleton, WI 53562

        Telephone:  608.827.7680

        Facsimile:  608.827.7681

        www.aplawoffice.com

         

        The information contained in this transmission is intended only for the personal and confidential use of  the designated recipient named above. This transmission may be an attorney-client communication, and as such is privileged and confidential. If the receiver of the transmission is not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient,  you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error, and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.

         

        From: MadisonLUChA@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MadisonLUChA@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kaleem Caire
        Sent: Friday, January 11, 2013 7:00 AM
        To: MadisonLUChA@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MadisonLUChA] FW: How Will We Civil Rights History and Progress Not Yet Made?

         

         

        My message to Urban League leaders across the USA.

         

        From: Kaleem Caire
        Sent: Friday, January 11, 2013 6:59 AM
        To: AOE
        Subject: How Will We Civil Rights History and Progress Not Yet Made?

         

        January 11, 2013

         

        My Dear Brothers and Sisters:

         

        I hope this message finds each of you and your families doing well and enjoying the beginning of this commemorative New Year that marks of our freedom in the United States of America. For it was 150 years ago, on January 1, 1863, that President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, thereby giving most slaves in the United States legal freedom from physical bondage. Slavery was forever made illegal in all states with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment on December 6, 1865. Lest we remember the dreams and aspirations of the 4,441,630 black men, women and children who resided in the U.S. in 1860 – 89% were slaves; only 11% were free.

         

        Here we are, 150 years later, a tall and strong people who should be proud of or rise despite our setbacks. When I look in the mirror every morning, I am proud to be a part of a unique people, a transatlantic mixture of ethnicities anchored by ebony, standing on the broad shoulders of giants in history who worked tirelessly to give us life, liberty and the ability to pursue equality, justice and a quality life for our people, and others.

         

        As I prepare to gaze into the same mirror right now, I am curious to learn how we Urban Leaguers, whose agencies have survived somewhere up to 100-plus years to address the lingering whip-marks of slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and discrimination, will honor the progress we have made in this country and remind Americans that we still have so much further to go?

         

        How will we acknowledge the progress of 50 years since John F. Kennedy gave his famous and controversial speech on Civil Rights (click here) on June 11, 1963? When I listen to Kennedy rattle-off the statistics on the percentage of African Americans graduating from high school and attending college, I can’t bring myself to ignore the painful, steady erosion of significant educational and economic gains our people made from 1964 – 1994. You can watch the full video of his speech by clicking here and visiting The Miller Center website.

         

        And, how will we remember, celebrate and take account of the progress we’ve made (and have not made) since President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on that warm, quiet summer day in our nation’s capital on July 2, 1964? How will we ensure that our children, families and communities are aware of and understand these great moments in history, and develop the conviction to continue to build forward?

         

        What will the next 50 and 150 years look like for us, for our children and families, for or people, for our country and our world?

         

        How will you and I, and the institutions we’ve been blessed to lead, work to yield the outcomes we still need to achieve? How will we truly achieve our Long Road to Brown?

         

        Every day, I am mindful of the extraordinary preparation, courage, struggle and true patriotism of our elders, ancestors and those who sympathized with their quest for freedom. They overcame mighty barriers to ensure our generation, and the ones that follow, could prosper.

         

        But I ask myself one more question. What do we need to do now to regain the momentum we’ve have lost to secure equality of opportunity for all, and achieve the goals and desires of our ancestors that our brother, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., so eloquently expressed in “I Have A Dream”?

         

        I look forward to engaging in these moments with you, and creating them for our community here in Dane County, Wisconsin.

         

        With love, respect and admiration.

         

        Your brother in the Struggle.

         

        ONE DAY.

         

        Strengthening the Bridge Between Education and Work

         

        Kaleem Caire

        President & CEO

        Urban League of Greater Madison

        Main: 608.729.1200

        Assistant: 608.729.1249

        Fax: 608.729.1205

        www.ulgm.org

        www.madison-prep.org

        Invest in the Urban League

        Urban League 2012 Third Quarter Progress Report

         

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