Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

using wire in costume making

Expand Messages
  • James Hinsey
    I was wondering if anyone here had any experience using metal wire to make a framework to drape or attached fabric to.? I suppose metal wire similar to what s
    Message 1 of 23 , Aug 5, 2008
      I was wondering if anyone here had any experience using metal wire to make a framework to drape or attached fabric to.? I suppose metal wire similar to what's used as underwire in bras,?flexible enough to be shaped but then stays in that shape and stong enough to hold fabric up.? Or wire used in wire forms but then incorporated into the outfit to hold the shape.? What gauge or thickness and width would be good?? Steel or Aluminium?? Welding joints or cross-points or rivets?? Do you sew the wire into the seam?

      James


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Skarlett Fever
      Hello James, Hoop wire may be what you are looking for. I ve used it to make hoop skirts for other costuming projects. You buy it by the yard and can sew it
      Message 2 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
        Hello James,

        Hoop wire may be what you are looking for.
        I've used it to make hoop skirts for other costuming projects.
        You buy it by the yard and can sew it into the bend you want.
        It comes covered in thread or plastic depending on the type you buy.
        I then sew a sleeve horizontially on my made skirt to thread the wire thru.

        Another option is boning-this can be plastic or steel.
        I use boning for bodices and corsets.
        Like the hoop wire, I sew a sleeve into the garment to slide the boning
        into, and then hand stitch it closed.

        Hope that helps and makes sense :)

        -Skarlett


        On 8/5/08, James Hinsey <SamuraiX47@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was wondering if anyone here had any experience using metal wire to
        > make a framework to drape or attached fabric to.? I suppose metal wire
        > similar to what's used as underwire in bras,?flexible enough to be shaped
        > but then stays in that shape and stong enough to hold fabric up.? Or wire
        > used in wire forms but then incorporated into the outfit to hold the shape.?
        > What gauge or thickness and width would be good?? Steel or Aluminium??
        > Welding joints or cross-points or rivets?? Do you sew the wire into the
        > seam?
        >
        > James
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        "If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.", Wilde


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Käthe Barrows
        ... Since you didn t tell us what you were trying to do, all the stuff I wrote below is just guessing at your purpose. But I do have some experience with
        Message 3 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
          > I was wondering if anyone here had any experience using metal wire to make
          > a framework to drape or attached fabric to.?


          Since you didn't tell us what you were trying to do, all the stuff I wrote
          below is just guessing at your purpose. But I do have some experience with
          different kinds of wire used in costumes.


          > I suppose metal wire similar to what's used as underwire in bras,?flexible
          > enough to be shaped but then stays in that shape and stong enough to hold
          > fabric up.?


          An old fashioned hobby store will have what they call piano wire. It's
          springy and comes in several gages. You can hardly put a kink in piano
          wire, even with pliers, so bending it to shape is difficult. Piano wire is
          good for stiffening things that stick out, like butterfly antennae. Coat
          hanger wire isn't as good because once it takes a bend it keeps it, and is
          prone to taking more bends as you bump into things or hang the costume in a
          crowded closet. But coat hanger wire is cheap and good for stiffening
          things like paper mache or things you're only going to use once. Floral
          wire is good for stiffening lace, because it's small gage and comes in white
          as well as green, but it takes kinks if you look at it wrong. (Carbon fiber
          is used for the struts of modern kites, but I've never used it as a
          stiffener in a costume.)

          For any wire, if you weld it it becomes brittle on either side of the weld,
          and welding is difficult to do on something as small as wire. Soldering
          won't take much stress, and your solder joints may break apart if you flex
          them too much; same for glue joints. Tying wire together with something is
          pretty good, and simple to do if you don't solder or weld, but tied joints
          will slip eventually even if you glue them. If you bend any wire too much
          in the same place, it will break.


          > What gauge or thickness and width would be good??


          Thick enough to do the job but not so thick it's heavy. This will, of
          course, depend on the job you're asking it to do. How are you trying to use
          wire in your costume?


          > Steel or Aluminium??
          >

          Aluminum and copper are too soft to be good for stiffeners - they may sag
          under the weight of what you want stiffened. Coat hangers are steel, and
          piano wire and bra underwires are spring steel.


          > Do you sew the wire into the seam?


          You might sew thin wire into seams, but if the seam flexes so will the wire,
          and it will take kinks and keep them (except piano wire). The ends of
          sewn-on wire always want to shift and poke through the fabric eventually,
          so, like the ends of bra underwires, the ends have to be made round
          somehow. A tiny loop at the end is good (almost impossible with piano
          wire), and you can sew through the loop when you sew the rest of the wire in
          place. Some wire is small enough that you can sew it on with a zig-zag
          stitch, but you'll break your needle if you sew right down onto a wire.

          Making a wire frame and sewing the fabric to it might also do. But until
          you give a clear idea of what you want this wire to do, nobody on the list
          can do any better than give general suggestions.

          --
          Carolyn Kayta Barrows
          --
          Blank paper is God's way of saying it ain't so easy being God.
          --


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • James Hinsey
          Thanks for the suggestions.  I m planning on making a panda costume... so it should be quite round, but without using too much stuffing or batting which will
          Message 4 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
            Thanks for the suggestions.  I'm planning on making a panda costume... so it should be quite round, but without using too much stuffing or batting which will make it heavier.  I like the idea of piano wire... I want it to be flexible and keep the roundness, almost bouncy.  I plan on using an exercise ball inside for the belly

            James


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Käthe Barrows <kaytab@...>
            Subject: Re: [MadameMalkins] using wire in costume making



            Since you didn't tell us what you were trying to do, all the stuff I wrote
            elow is just guessing at your purpose. But I do have some experience with
            ifferent kinds of wire used in costumes.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Skarlett Fever
            For a full-body costume you may also want to consider foam. Foam can be cut to your desired shape, is light weight, and can hold fabric or be painted. Good
            Message 5 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
              For a full-body costume you may also want to consider foam.
              Foam can be cut to your desired shape, is light weight, and can hold fabric
              or be painted.

              Good Luck!
              Skarlett


              On 8/6/08, James Hinsey <SamuraiX47@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks for the suggestions. I'm planning on making a panda costume...
              > so it should be quite round, but without using too much stuffing or
              > batting which will make it heavier. I like the idea of piano wire... I want
              > it to be flexible and keep the roundness, almost bouncy. I plan on using an
              > exercise ball inside for the belly
              >
              > James
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Käthe Barrows <kaytab@... <kaytab%40gmail.com>>
              > Subject: Re: [MadameMalkins] using wire in costume making
              >
              > Since you didn't tell us what you were trying to do, all the stuff I wrote
              > elow is just guessing at your purpose. But I do have some experience with
              > ifferent kinds of wire used in costumes.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              --
              "If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.", Wilde


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Frances Sturgess
              the army surplus stores used to sell weather balloons :-) might be lighter than an exercise ball.. Frankie ... From: James Hinsey To:
              Message 6 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
                the army surplus stores used to sell weather balloons :-) might be lighter than an exercise ball..
                Frankie
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: James Hinsey
                To: MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 11:46 AM
                Subject: Re: [MadameMalkins] using wire in costume making


                Thanks for the suggestions. I'm planning on making a panda costume... so it should be quite round, but without using too much stuffing or batting which will make it heavier. I like the idea of piano wire... I want it to be flexible and keep the roundness, almost bouncy. I plan on using an exercise ball inside for the belly

                James

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Käthe Barrows <kaytab@...>
                Subject: Re: [MadameMalkins] using wire in costume making

                Since you didn't tell us what you were trying to do, all the stuff I wrote
                elow is just guessing at your purpose. But I do have some experience with
                ifferent kinds of wire used in costumes.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Käthe Barrows
                ... Piano wire, and hoop wire, are the same spring steel. But piano wire, in a hobby store, comes in shorter lengths than you probably want. Go ahead and use
                Message 7 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
                  > I'm planning on making a panda costume... so it should be quite round, but
                  > without using too much stuffing or batting which will make it heavier. I
                  > like the idea of piano wire...


                  Piano wire, and hoop wire, are the same spring steel. But piano wire, in a
                  hobby store, comes in shorter lengths than you probably want. Go ahead and
                  use hoop wire for inside the belly, so it will be totally empty inside. Use
                  several hoops of it. Hoop wire will take a lot of bumping before it kinks,
                  and will usually bounce right back into shape (I know this from hoop
                  skirts). Fabric stores that sell bridal stuff are more likely to sell hoop
                  wire than a fabric store with lots of cheap craft stuff (like JoAnn's).


                  > I want it to be flexible and keep the roundness, almost bouncy. I plan on
                  > using an exercise ball inside for the belly
                  >

                  --
                  Carolyn Kayta Barrows
                  --
                  Blank paper is God's way of saying it ain't so easy being God.
                  --


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • rookwoods
                  You might even consider getting a hula-hoop and cutting it down to the diameter you need (and maybe lose the rattling bits). It would definitely be lighter
                  Message 8 of 23 , Aug 6, 2008
                    You might even consider getting a hula-hoop and cutting it down to the
                    diameter you need (and maybe lose the rattling bits). It would
                    definitely be lighter than hooping. You could either make a channel to
                    run it in, or a bunch of loops to feed it through so that you could
                    remove it for costume cleaning if necessary.

                    -Judy

                    --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, James Hinsey <SamuraiX47@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks for the suggestions. I'm planning on making a panda
                    costume... so it should be quite round, but without using too much
                    stuffing or batting which will make it heavier. I like the idea of
                    piano wire... I want it to be flexible and keep the roundness, almost
                    bouncy. I plan on using an exercise ball inside for the belly
                    >
                    > James
                    >
                  • Toker, Sue (US SSA)
                    This is a repeat of the Foam suggestions. I have heard of other people wanting to make a round character (ie Fat suits to critters). I have heard that they
                    Message 9 of 23 , Aug 7, 2008
                      This is a repeat of the Foam suggestions.



                      I have heard of other people wanting to make a "round" character (ie Fat
                      suits to critters). I have heard that they use Foam Rubber to do a lot
                      of the shaping since it is light weight and can be sculpted using (of
                      all things) an electric meat slicing knife. I know there are a lot of
                      "fur suiter" types who built creatures all the time. Unfortunately I
                      don't really know and exact address for them, but there are two general
                      costume list you could use for your research.



                      F-Costume@yahoogroups.com

                      ICG-D@yahoogroups.com



                      This list has a more semi-pro/pro costumers (ie they work for small
                      theaters and local dance groups). They might be helpful too.



                      TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com



                      Susan



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Käthe Barrows
                      ... Problem is, with only one Hula Hoop you might end up looking like a lampsahde. Hoop skirts with only one hoop tend to look that way. But hoop wire is
                      Message 10 of 23 , Aug 7, 2008
                        >
                        > You might even consider getting a hula-hoop and cutting it down to the
                        > diameter you need (and maybe lose the rattling bits). It would
                        > definitely be lighter than hooping. You could either make a channel to
                        > run it in, or a bunch of loops to feed it through so that you could
                        > remove it for costume cleaning if necessary.


                        Problem is, with only one Hula Hoop you might end up looking like a
                        lampsahde. Hoop skirts with only one hoop tend to look that way. But hoop
                        wire is pretty small gage, and not as heavy as you might think. Besides,
                        the weight of it will be carried on your shoulders and supported by your
                        legs, the strongest muscles/bones in your body. Hoop skirts don't feel like
                        they weight a thing, and using hoop wire shouldn't add appreciable weight.

                        Meanwhile, Furries usually use foam, and what other people say about
                        sculpting the stuff is good. foam "doesn't weight a thing" either, and has
                        softer curves when carved - no hoop lines.

                        --
                        > Carolyn Kayta Barrows
                        > --
                        > Blank paper is God's way of saying it ain't so easy being God.
                        > --


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • rookwoods
                        ... so... if you re going to use more than one hoop, why would you think to only use one hula-hoop? Steel hooping can work perfectly fine, I m just suggesting
                        Message 11 of 23 , Aug 7, 2008
                          --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, "Käthe Barrows" <kaytab@...> wrote:
                          > Problem is, with only one Hula Hoop you might end up looking like a
                          > lampsahde. Hoop skirts with only one hoop tend to look that way.

                          so... if you're going to use more than one hoop, why would you
                          think to only use one hula-hoop? Steel hooping can work perfectly
                          fine, I'm just suggesting something else that can also work.

                          -Judy
                        • James Hinsey
                          What kind of glue or contact cement would be good for foam? What do people use to create lines, creases or indents in the foam? Do they use heat, or do they
                          Message 12 of 23 , Aug 7, 2008
                            What kind of glue or contact cement would be good for foam? What do
                            people use to create lines, creases or indents in the foam? Do they use
                            heat, or do they stitch it from behind to pull the foam inward? I know
                            the head part will need the most shaping for the eyes, nose, mouth.

                            I'm looking at maybe using anti-pill fleece instead of trying to find
                            white and black faux-fur. It would cost less, be easier to sew, and
                            look fine from a distance. The fleece would lay over the foam like
                            skin.

                            James

                            --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, "Skarlett Fever"
                            <skarlettfever@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > For a full-body costume you may also want to consider foam.
                            > Foam can be cut to your desired shape, is light weight, and can hold
                            fabric
                            > or be painted.
                            >
                            > Good Luck!
                            > Skarlett
                            >
                          • James Hinsey
                            Thanks everyone for your help. I may have to do a mix of using wire and foam... wire framework, layer of foam over. I have 3-4 months to work on it in time
                            Message 13 of 23 , Aug 7, 2008
                              Thanks everyone for your help. I may have to do a mix of using wire
                              and foam... wire framework, layer of foam over. I have 3-4 months to
                              work on it in time for Arisia.

                              James
                            • rookwoods
                              ... When I was gluing foam to make cat beds, I got an aerosol glue at the fabric store. It was X... I dont remember, but it said on the lable that it was good
                              Message 14 of 23 , Aug 8, 2008
                                --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, "James Hinsey" <SamuraiX47@...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                > What kind of glue or contact cement would be good for foam?

                                When I was gluing foam to make cat beds, I got an aerosol glue
                                at the fabric store. It was X... I dont' remember, but it said on the
                                lable that it was good for foam. You have to be careful because some
                                glues won't hold on porous material, and some glues will dissolve some
                                foams. This was great and held extremely strong.

                                What do
                                > people use to create lines, creases or indents in the foam? Do they use
                                > heat, or do they stitch it from behind to pull the foam inward? I know
                                > the head part will need the most shaping for the eyes, nose, mouth.

                                and don't forget you can glue the crease as well. I think
                                you'll mostly have to experiment. You can also airbrush on foam - or
                                on fabric over foam. I have a friend who has done quite a lot of that.

                                -Judy
                              • Käthe Barrows
                                ... Only because you said hoop , in the singular. I guess I ve just seen too many bad hoopskirts, making the shirts over them look like lampshades. ... Yep.
                                Message 15 of 23 , Aug 8, 2008
                                  On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 5:53 PM, rookwoods <judymitch@...>wrote:

                                  > --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, "Käthe Barrows" <kaytab@...> wrote:
                                  > > Problem is, with only one Hula Hoop you might end up looking like a
                                  > > lampsahde. Hoop skirts with only one hoop tend to look that way.
                                  >
                                  > so... if you're going to use more than one hoop, why would you
                                  > think to only use one hula-hoop?


                                  Only because you said "hoop", in the singular. I guess I've just seen too
                                  many bad hoopskirts, making the shirts over them look like lampshades.


                                  > Steel hooping can work perfectly
                                  > fine, I'm just suggesting something else that can also work.


                                  Yep. Plenty of other things can work too, including chair-seat caning,
                                  plastic cable ties, and whatever it is they weave baskets out of. Actual
                                  Renaissance hoop skirts were made of thin splints of wood. Whatever works,
                                  and whatever you can get your hands on.

                                  --
                                  Carolyn Kayta Barrows
                                  --
                                  Blank paper is God's way of saying it ain't so easy being God.
                                  --


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Rach W
                                  ... Rubber cement. Follow the container s instructions, especially the warning about using in a well ventilated area. There are also spray adhesives that are
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Aug 8, 2008
                                    On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 10:05 PM, James Hinsey wrote:

                                    > What kind of glue or contact cement would be good for foam?

                                    Rubber cement. Follow the container's instructions, especially the
                                    warning about using in a well ventilated area. There are also spray
                                    adhesives that are made specifically for foam. Be sure to check the
                                    label.

                                    > What do people use to create lines, creases or indents in the foam?

                                    Carving is the best way. But be prepared for the attack of the
                                    static-electrified foam bits. I usually use varying sizes of scissors
                                    for the detail work.

                                    > Do they use heat, or do they stitch it from behind to pull the foam
                                    > inward?

                                    Personally I'd stay away from melting as being way too dangerous. Since
                                    string will cut foam one way to tack from behind is to anchor the ends
                                    with something like a button.

                                    > I know the head part will need the most shaping for the eyes, nose,
                                    > mouth.

                                    I'd make the parts that stick out separately and then attach to the
                                    head.

                                    > I'm looking at maybe using anti-pill fleece instead of trying to find
                                    white and black faux-fur. It would cost less, be easier to sew, and
                                    look fine from a distance. The fleece would lay over the foam like
                                    skin.

                                    There are fleeces out there that have a "fur-like" texture, like Minky
                                    http://www.fabric.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=973d0d71-dda4-465c-a35a-3d53b511018d

                                    BTW check out this week's "Ace of Cakes" they did a cake for the
                                    premiere of Kung Fu Panda which had a very nice panda walk-around.
                                    http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_db/episode/0,3100,FOOD_26996_58829,00.html

                                    Rach


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Frances Sturgess
                                    wow great ideas i am saving this mail to my costume file Frankie ... From: Käthe Barrows To: MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, August 08, 2008 7:03
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Aug 8, 2008
                                      wow
                                      great ideas

                                      i am saving this mail to my costume file
                                      Frankie
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: Käthe Barrows
                                      To: MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Friday, August 08, 2008 7:03 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [MadameMalkins] Re: using wire in costume making


                                      On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 5:53 PM, rookwoods <judymitch@...>wrote:

                                      > --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, "Käthe Barrows" <kaytab@...> wrote:
                                      > > Problem is, with only one Hula Hoop you might end up looking like a
                                      > > lampsahde. Hoop skirts with only one hoop tend to look that way.
                                      >
                                      > so... if you're going to use more than one hoop, why would you
                                      > think to only use one hula-hoop?

                                      Only because you said "hoop", in the singular. I guess I've just seen too
                                      many bad hoopskirts, making the shirts over them look like lampshades.

                                      > Steel hooping can work perfectly
                                      > fine, I'm just suggesting something else that can also work.

                                      Yep. Plenty of other things can work too, including chair-seat caning,
                                      plastic cable ties, and whatever it is they weave baskets out of. Actual
                                      Renaissance hoop skirts were made of thin splints of wood. Whatever works,
                                      and whatever you can get your hands on.

                                      --
                                      Carolyn Kayta Barrows
                                      --
                                      Blank paper is God's way of saying it ain't so easy being God.
                                      --

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • rookwoods
                                      ... also, if you end up building blocks of foam together to make large sections (like for feet or head...) you can shape it with an electric carving knife -
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Aug 9, 2008
                                        --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, "Frances Sturgess"
                                        <franstur@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > wow
                                        > great ideas
                                        >
                                        > i am saving this mail to my costume file
                                        > Frankie

                                        also, if you end up building blocks of foam together to make large
                                        sections (like for feet or head...) you can shape it with an electric
                                        carving knife - you know those things you can get for really cheap at
                                        yard sales that are supposed to carve turkey? Just dedicate it solely
                                        to foam and don't use it afterwards for food. And wear a mask!! and do
                                        it outside or somewhere you won't care about shreddy foam bits flying.

                                        -Judy
                                      • James Hinsey
                                        If any of you watch Good Eats you know how Alton Brown hates uni-taskers... and he does like to use the eletric carving knife for lots of things.? I might use
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Aug 9, 2008
                                          If any of you watch Good Eats you know how Alton Brown hates uni-taskers... and he does like to use the eletric carving knife for lots of things.? I might use some of that green planters foam, the stuff sold to stick flower stems into.? It's almost a solid... easy to carve with small tools... glue a few together into a large block.

                                          James




                                          also, if you end up building blocks of foam together to make large
                                          sections (like for feet or head...) you can shape it with an electric
                                          carving knife - you know those things you can get for really cheap at
                                          yard sales that are supposed to carve turkey? Just dedicate it solely
                                          to foam and don't use it afterwards for food. And wear a mask!! and do
                                          it outside or somewhere you won't care about shreddy foam bits flying.

                                          -Judy



                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • rookwoods
                                          ... uni-taskers... and he does like to use the eletric carving knife for lots of things.? I might use some of that green planters foam, the stuff sold to stick
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Aug 10, 2008
                                            --- In MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com, James Hinsey <SamuraiX47@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > If any of you watch Good Eats you know how Alton Brown hates
                                            uni-taskers... and he does like to use the eletric carving knife for
                                            lots of things.? I might use some of that green planters foam, the
                                            stuff sold to stick flower stems into.? It's almost a solid... easy to
                                            carve with small tools... glue a few together into a large block.
                                            >
                                            > James
                                            >

                                            before you buy lots of that green floral foam, buy a small bit and
                                            try gluing it together first! that stuff is extremely porous, and
                                            dissolves eventually even with water, I'd be worried about glue
                                            dissolving it. test first! if you find a glue that works, fab!

                                            -Judy
                                          • darth_eagle
                                            ... Hmmmmm.....to my knowledge, there are 2 type of Floral Sponge: The kind that absorbed Water and used for Fresh Flower and the Dry Kind for Artificial
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Aug 13, 2008
                                              "rookwoods" <judymitch@...> wrote:
                                              > before you buy lots of that green floral foam, buy a small bit and
                                              > try gluing it together first! that stuff is extremely porous, and
                                              > dissolves eventually even with water, I'd be worried about glue
                                              > dissolving it. test first! if you find a glue that works, fab!

                                              Hmmmmm.....to my knowledge, there are 2 type of Floral Sponge:
                                              The kind that absorbed Water and used for Fresh Flower and the Dry Kind
                                              for Artificial Flowers

                                              Either way, I feel they're too "fragile to be used" for Mascot
                                              especially the "Wet Kind". :\

                                              Fatimah
                                            • James Hinsey
                                              If i were to use the green floral foam blocks to carve a head piece that will be covered by fur or fleece fabric &?I would definitely keep it away from water.?
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Aug 13, 2008
                                                If i were to use the green floral foam blocks to carve a head piece that will be covered by fur or fleece fabric &?I would definitely keep it away from water.? Most contact cements are not water based but could dissolve plastic.? I'm going to have to buy some foam sheets?from the fabric store and try shaping it.? Someone said to use rubber cement.

                                                James




                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: darth_eagle <darth_eagle@...>
                                                To: MadameMalkins@yahoogroups.com
                                                Sent: Wed, 13 Aug 2008 11:49 am
                                                Subject: [MadameMalkins] Re: using wire in costume making



                                                "rookwoods" <judymitch@...> wrote:
                                                > before you buy lots of that green floral foam, buy a small bit and
                                                > try gluing it together first! that stuff is extremely porous, and
                                                > dissolves eventually even with water, I'd be worried about glue
                                                > dissolving it. test first! if you find a glue that works, fab!

                                                Hmmmmm.....to my knowledge, there are 2 type of Floral Sponge:
                                                The kind that absorbed Water and used for Fresh Flower and the Dry Kind
                                                for Artificial Flowers

                                                Either way, I feel they're too "fragile to be used" for Mascot
                                                especially the "Wet Kind". :\

                                                Fatimah





                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Rach W
                                                One thing you must remember is that in a full body costume you SWEAT - not a little bit, but buckets. So I d stay away from floral foam since the inside will
                                                Message 23 of 23 , Aug 13, 2008
                                                  One thing you must remember is that in a full body costume you SWEAT -
                                                  not a little bit, but buckets. So I'd stay away from floral foam since
                                                  the inside will get wet.

                                                  Get a variety of thickness. Some parts, like ears, can be carved. But
                                                  bigger areas have to be pieced together like shown here
                                                  http://www.mascot-costumes.net/note.htm
                                                  (BTW "mascot" is a good search term for lots of pages about the kind of
                                                  costume you want to do.)

                                                  I'm the one who said rubber cement. It's what the puppet company I work
                                                  for has used for years. The cement will yellow with age, but the bond
                                                  lasts longer than the foam does.

                                                  Rach


                                                  On Wed, Aug 13, 2008 at 12:32 PM, James Hinsey wrote:

                                                  If i were to use the green floral foam blocks to carve a head piece that
                                                  will be covered by fur or fleece fabric &?I would definitely keep it
                                                  away from water.? Most contact cements are not water based but could
                                                  dissolve plastic.? I'm going to have to buy some foam sheets?from the
                                                  fabric store and try shaping it.? Someone said to use rubber cement.

                                                  James


                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.