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Re: [MPD-5D] re: karen's post

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  • Joey
    Many traffic tickets lead to drug arrests. The last three traffic tickets in my anc resulted in three drug arrests. Joey ... From: Tobias Kienle
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2005
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      Many traffic tickets lead to drug arrests. The last three traffic tickets in my anc resulted in three drug arrests. Joey
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Tobias Kienle <tfkienle@...>
      Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 14:25:42
      To:MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MPD-5D] re: karen's post

      I couldn't agree more. I'm much more concerned about
      drug dealing (which is the cause of most of the
      violence) than traffic violations, with the exception
      of ignoring ped crossings & school zones. People need
      to understand police, and city, resources are limited.
      I don't want MPD focusing on anything but the most
      serious cases of reckless driving. I would prefer
      they focus on the real crimes. An officer writing a
      traffic ticket is taken away from his beat for 15
      minutes or more. And I'd like to see more foot-beat
      patrolling & community-oriented policing. The problem
      w/ all the car-based patrolling is that criminals see
      the car coming, lay low, then come right back out &
      pick up where they left off. Its too predictable, and
      the car/officer is out of the area in seconds. A
      better balance between foot, bike & car patrols needs
      to be reached, which would save money also.

      While it may statistically be true that you are more
      likely to be involved in a traffic incident, this
      doesn't have the negative quality-of-life implications
      of drug-related violence. I don't worry about some
      guy rolling through a stop sign or speeding. If you
      live in a city, you get savvy & learn to work around
      that. But I do worry about some thugs deciding my
      street is the OK Corral & getting caught in the
      crossfire. Violence & hard crime weighs on the spirit
      and affects attitude/mood more than minor crimes. I
      doubt the people around N. Cap/1st/Bates are sitting
      around thinking gee, I hope I don't see someone roll
      through a stop sign while I'm out walking the dog.

      TK



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    • Bill and Rob
      Police walking the street don t stop crime. The crime just moves. Respect needs to built and learned. This does not happen over night. This happens by
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 5, 2005
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        Police walking the street don't stop crime. The crime
        just moves. Respect needs to built and learned. This
        does not happen over night. This happens by enforcing
        all crimes...no matter how real they are. A "real
        crime" is less likely to impact you than a traffic
        incident within the DC area. You are likely, as a
        pedestrian or driver, to be in an accident and receive
        injury every five years (this does not include the
        accidents without injury).

        As for not having a neg-impact on quality of
        life...would like to meet my sister who has had three
        major back surgery as a result of a car accident? The
        amount of money our car insurance would decrease
        because of fewer accidents and safer roads couold go
        to hiring more security.

        What you are asking for is more of the same...a
        reactive police force. What I'm asking for an
        offensive police force. Detering crime through respect
        of the law. If someone believes that they are unable
        to get away with a minor crime, then why would they
        believe they can get away with a felony?

        It's time for a transition within the police force. A
        focus on sting opperations and reaction to felony
        crimes, while training and building a force that can
        deal with minor offenses like traffic violation.
        During a routine traffic stop, the office can check a
        person's police record, see if there is any just cause
        to search a car to find weapons and drugs. If they are
        found, the officer may have just prevented a felony
        from taking place.

        We can wait for the criminal to make himselve or
        herselve known to us after committing the crime. we
        must deal with the higher risk of the crime taking
        place at this time. Patrols are good, but why pay for
        an officer to drive around, waiting for a crime to
        happen. That office could be doing other things, like
        pulling over speeders and making the road safer or
        removing loiters or fining litters. So much needs to
        get done and no elected officials are doing anything
        about it.


        --- Tobias Kienle <tfkienle@...> wrote:

        > I couldn't agree more. I'm much more concerned
        > about
        > drug dealing (which is the cause of most of the
        > violence) than traffic violations, with the
        > exception
        > of ignoring ped crossings & school zones. People
        > need
        > to understand police, and city, resources are
        > limited.
        > I don't want MPD focusing on anything but the most
        > serious cases of reckless driving. I would prefer
        > they focus on the real crimes. An officer writing a
        > traffic ticket is taken away from his beat for 15
        > minutes or more. And I'd like to see more foot-beat
        > patrolling & community-oriented policing. The
        > problem
        > w/ all the car-based patrolling is that criminals
        > see
        > the car coming, lay low, then come right back out &
        > pick up where they left off. Its too predictable,
        > and
        > the car/officer is out of the area in seconds. A
        > better balance between foot, bike & car patrols
        > needs
        > to be reached, which would save money also.
        >
        > While it may statistically be true that you are more
        > likely to be involved in a traffic incident, this
        > doesn't have the negative quality-of-life
        > implications
        > of drug-related violence. I don't worry about some
        > guy rolling through a stop sign or speeding. If you
        > live in a city, you get savvy & learn to work around
        > that. But I do worry about some thugs deciding my
        > street is the OK Corral & getting caught in the
        > crossfire. Violence & hard crime weighs on the
        > spirit
        > and affects attitude/mood more than minor crimes. I
        > doubt the people around N. Cap/1st/Bates are sitting
        > around thinking "gee, I hope I don't see someone
        > roll
        > through a stop sign while I'm out walking the dog".
        >
        > TK
        >
        >
        >
        > ____________________________________________________
        > Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
        > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
        >
        >




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