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RE: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives To Reduce Crime

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  • Aaron Watkins
    please tell me where this. -----Original Message----- Date: Thursday, June 05, 2008 10:33:46 pm To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com Subject: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 5, 2008
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      please tell me where this.
      -----Original Message-----
      Date: Thursday, June 05, 2008 10:33:46 pm
      To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives To Reduce Crime
      From: "k_fw" <k_fw@...>

      My family and I have been threatened numerous times by people
      drinking on our street corners and peeing in our alleys. Not all the
      time, but most of the time the threats come from those who drive cars
      with MD tags.

      They tell us to move out of "their" neighborhood. And if we don't,
      then they claim there will be "tensions." Once we were told we were
      going to be shot. (The logic is that the neighborhood is "theirs"
      because they grew up here and we didn't. The fact that we are
      raising our children here and they aren't is not an effective
      argument!) So in a way, I welcome this intitiative. My family and I
      deserve to feel safe in our neighborhood.

      In another way, I'm not sure how effective this approach will be.
      Most loiterers claim (and probably do) to have relatives in the
      neighborhood. Even though they don't seem to be visiting their
      relatives, I bet they would pass a check-point unscathed. Still I
      suspect some of the cockiest, rowdiest offenders may act up enough to
      get their car searched...thereby taking some of the young ones off
      the street if drugs/weapons were found.

      But I agree that police permanently dedicated to high-crime areas,
      who can get to know the regulars, would be the most effective
      approach to stemming the violence.

      Still I remain hopeful a solution may be found.
    • bigriq
      While providing some short term security gains this doesn t appear to be a long term solution. Where is the comprehensive long term plan to solve the problem?
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 5, 2008
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        While providing some short term security gains this doesn't appear to
        be a long term solution. Where is the comprehensive long term plan to
        solve the problem?
        --- In MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Vinson Brannum" <rbrannum@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Dear Neighbors, this morning I and ANC Commissioners William Shelton
        (5B01),
        > India Henderson (5B10), Wilhelmina Lawson(5B06), and former ANC
        Commissioner
        > Kathy Henderson attended the press conference held by the Mayor,
        Chief Cathy
        > Lanier, and Councilman Harry Thomas to announce "Expanded Public Safety
        > Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime". The text of the
        press
        > announcement follows. I would also remind you of the 10 point Action
        Plan
        > outlined several weeks ago by Councilman Harry Thomas. The
        Councilman's plan
        > calls for, among other initiatives increased jobs and job training
        for young
        > adults, mentoring programs in targeted neighborhoods, mental health
        > screening, mediation services, and the expansion of access to
        alcohol drug
        > counseling.
        >
        >
        >
        > Robert
        >
        >
        >
        > Robert Vinson Brannum
        >
        > Chair, 5th District Citizens' Advisory Council
        >
        > **********
        >
        >
        >
        > News Release for Immediate Release
        > June 4, 2008
        >
        > Mayor, Chief: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing
        > Neighborhood Crime
        >
        > Today, Mayor Adrian M. Fenty and Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier
        > announced the expansion of the Focused Improvement Area (FIA) initiative
        > into four new neighborhoods and the creation of the Neighborhood Safety
        > Zones (NSZ) initiative. Both programs are targeted initiatives aimed at
        > reducing criminal activity and increasing quality of life in at-risk
        > communities.
        >
        > "The residents of the District of Columbia depend on their government to
        > keep the city where they live, work and play safe," said Fenty. "These
        > initiatives allow us to deploy tools we already have available in a
        targeted
        > way to have the greatest impact."
        >
        > Expanding Focused Improvement Areas
        > The Focused Improvement Areas were established as a pilot program in
        > November 2007 to combine an increased law enforcement presence with
        support
        > from human service agencies and community-based organizations to address
        > deeper societal issues facing at-risk communities. The program will be
        > expanded into four new neighborhoods (maps attached), which will
        bring the
        > total number of FIAs to seven. FIAs involve several District
        agencies in
        > cooperation with non-governmental community-based organizations to
        address
        > the root causes of crime by increasing employment services, engaging
        youth
        > in meaningful activities, promoting individual health, well being
        and family
        > strengthening, and improving neighborhood appearance.
        >
        > In addition to intensified efforts to improve neighborhood
        appearance, human
        > services resources are focused on at-risk individuals, their
        families and
        > households. Individuals and households selected for direct outreach and
        > intervention are identified through public safety information and
        outreach
        > led by non-governmental volunteers including faith-based groups and
        > government agencies and school outreach, with an emphasis on root-cause
        > analysis. Crime statistics have shown overall reductions in crime in the
        > pilot FIAs, particularly in the categories of assaults and
        automobile theft.
        >
        >
        > The new FIAs are located in the Third, Fourth, Fifth and Seventh police
        > districts. Lead District agencies for FIAs include the Department of
        > Employment Services, Department of Human Services, Department of
        Parks and
        > Recreation, Department of Health and Department of Consumer and
        Regulatory
        > Affairs.
        >
        > Neighborhood Safety Zones
        > The Neighborhood Safety Zone initiative has been developed to help
        increase
        > security for those who live in high-crime areas around the city and
        to help
        > residents reclaim their communities. The program will authorize the
        > Metropolitan Police Department to set up public safety checks to help
        > safeguard community members and create safer neighborhoods in the
        District
        > by increasing police presence aimed at deterring crime.
        >
        > The safety zones will be established only upon request by a District
        > Commander where there is evidence to support the existence of
        neighborhood
        > violent crime, such as intelligence, violent crime data, police
        reports and
        > feedback and concerns from the affected community.
        >
        > Potential Neighborhood Safety Zones must be approved by the Chief of
        Police,
        > and will be in effect for a maximum of 10 days. Public safety
        checks will
        > be established along the main thoroughfares of the established
        > neighborhoods. Anyone driving into a designated area may be asked
        to show
        > valid identification with a home address in that neighborhood, or to
        provide
        > an explanation for entering the NSZ, such as attending church, a
        doctor's
        > appointment or visiting friends or relatives. Pedestrians will not be
        > subject to the public safety checks.
        >
        > "The Neighborhood Safety Zones is just another tool MPD will employ
        to stop
        > crime before it happens. The Neighborhood Safety Zone initiative
        will help
        > residents terrorized by violent crime to take back their neighborhoods,"
        > said Chief Lanier.
        > Initiatives such as the Neighborhood Safety Zones have been accepted by
        > federal courts as a legitimate law enforcement practice in keeping
        with the
        > Constitution's Fourth Amendment. The constitutionality of the NSZ
        > initiative has been reviewed by the D.C. Office of the Attorney
        General.
        >
        > The NSZ will be launched next week in the Trinidad area.
        >
      • A R
        Also, there was a surge in prison releases recently all over the country.  These were people who were sent to prisons in the early 90s under tougher
        Message 3 of 21 , Jun 6, 2008
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          Also, there was a surge in prison releases recently all over the country.  These were people who were sent to prisons in the early 90s under tougher sentencing laws.  They came out with prison records and no skills (except skills to create more crime), so the only thing they know how to do is return to crime. 

          Crime is up in cities all over the country.  I know the problems we had on our block recently were largely due to people recently released from long stints in prison.  I am all for sending the bad guys to prison, but I also recognize that more has to be done to ensure that, once they do their time, they have the opportunity and skills to work a legitimate job.  And yes, you combine this with a tanking economy and you have a recipe for disaster.

          Does anyone know of what happens in other countries in terms of prison release and job training/opportunities?  I am pretty sure that other countries don't have the high recidivism rates that we do. 

          AR

          --- On Thu, 6/5/08, Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@...> wrote:
          From: Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@...>
          Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
          To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 9:24 PM

          Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a decline.  What happened?


          For starters, the economy tanked.  Economy good, less crime (in very general terms).  People have less, some will try to take from others.  Pretty simple, in the long run.  

          2 years ago, people were not feeling quite as "pinched" by the economy.  Now it is a different story.  Same reason that we saw a spike in muggings before Christmas...  

          Taylor


          On Jun 5, 2008, at 2:13 PM, Detria Hutchinson wrote:


          The trite response still does not answer the question as to whether individuals want to live in the United States which guarantees privacy rights or parts of the world where martial law is the norm.  BTW--when the ACLU sues the city and win million dollar lawsuits on behalf of individuals who were stopped, detained, denied access without probable cause, etc.  who do you think will foot that bill. There must be a better and legal way to combat crime.  Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a decline.  What happened?

          --- On Thu, 6/5/08, k.jarrell01@ comcast.net <k.jarrell01@ comcast.net> wrote:
          From: k.jarrell01@ comcast.net <k.jarrell01@ comcast.net>
          Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
          To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com, MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com
          Cc: "Joshua Maye" <usmarinecorp10@ yahoo.com>
          Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 12:43 PM


          Joshua,
          Then don't complain when someone you know is shot!
          Keith Jarrell
          --
          In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. 
          Martin Luther King Jr.
           
          ------------ -- Original message ------------ -- 
          From: Joshua Maye <usmarinecorp10@ yahoo.com> 

          I don't like it because it is to close to being martial law and this is not the Green Zone in Iraq. To tell a citizen that they cannot go into another neighborhood unless they live there is unAmerican, unconstitutional, and a violation of the civil liberties of citizens of the District of Columbia. The Police Department need to find a better way to address the increase in crime in DC, because so-called martial law, will not work for it will entice criminal behavior. You can say, I am articulating the words of the ACLU, but I'm just being real. The ban on handguns in DC ain't work, this so-called martial law will not work either. 
           



        • DCReardon@AOL.COM
          In this country, if you are a felon, it is almost impossible to get a decent job.? We need a record shield law like they have in some other States to allow
          Message 4 of 21 , Jun 6, 2008
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            In this country, if you are a felon, it is almost impossible to get a decent job.  We need a "record shield law" like they have in some other States to allow these people to actually have a chance at re-entry.  This keeps the criminal history shielded from employers.  Because if you are a felon, your resume goes in the trash. And as Ms. Henderson just posted, over 700 people have been released into Trinidad......700 people who are unable to get  into mainstream American life can certainly cause problems.


            -----Original Message-----
            From: A R <arcurlyq@...>
            To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, 6 Jun 2008 7:30 am
            Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime

            Also, there was a surge in prison releases recently all over the country.  These were people who were sent to prisons in the early 90s under tougher sentencing laws.  They came out with prison records and no skills (except skills to create more crime), so the only thing they know how to do is return to crime. 

            Crime is up in cities all over the country.  I know the problems we had on our block recently were largely due to people recently released from long stints in prison.  I am all for sending the bad guys to prison, but I also recognize that more has to be done to ensure that, once they do their time, they have the opportunity and skills to work a legitimate job.  And yes, you combine this with a tanking economy and you have a recipe for disaster.

            Does anyone know of what happens in other countries in terms of prison release and job training/opportunities?  I am pretty sure that other countries don't have the high recidivism rates that we do. 

            AR

            --- On Thu, 6/5/08, Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@...> wrote:
            From: Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@...>
            Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
            To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 9:24 PM

            Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a decline.  What happened?


            For starters, the economy tanked.  Economy good, less crime (in very general terms).  People have less, some will try to take from others.  Pretty simple, in the long run.  

            2 years ago, people were not feeling quite as "pinched" by the economy.  Now it is a different story.  Same reason that we saw a spike in muggings before Christmas...  

            Taylor


            On Jun 5, 2008, at 2:13 PM, Detria Hutchinson wrote:


            The trite response still does not answer the question as to whether individuals want to live in the United States which guarantees privacy rights or parts of the world where martial law is the norm.  BTW--when the ACLU sues the city and win million dollar lawsuits on behalf of individuals who were stopped, detained, denied access without probable cause, etc.  who do you think will foot that bill. There must be a better and legal way to combat crime.  Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a decline.  What happened?

            --- On Thu, 6/5/08, k.jarrell01@ comcast.net <k.jarrell01@ comcast.net> wrote:
            From: k.jarrell01@ comcast.net <k.jarrell01@ comcast.net>
            Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
            To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com, MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com
            Cc: "Joshua Maye" <usmarinecorp10@ yahoo.com>
            Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 12:43 PM


            Joshua,
            Then don't complain when someone you know is shot!
            Keith Jarrell
            --
            In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. 
            Martin Luther King Jr.
             
            ------------ -- Original message ------------ -- 
            From: Joshua Maye <usmarinecorp10@ yahoo.com> 

            I don't like it because it is to close to being martial law and this is not the Green Zone in Iraq. To tell a citizen that they cannot go into another neighborhood unless they live there is unAmerican, unconstitutional, and a violation of the civil liberties of citizens of the District of Columbia. The Police Department need to find a better way to address the increase in crime in DC, because so-called martial law, will not work for it will entice criminal behavior. You can say, I am articulating the words of the ACLU, but I'm just being real. The ban on handguns in DC ain't work, this so-called martial law will not work either. 
             



          • A R
            I agree with this, but only for non-violent offenses and offenses that don t involve children.  And for violent offenses and offenses that involved
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 6, 2008
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              I agree with this, but only for non-violent offenses and offenses that don't involve children.  And for violent offenses and offenses that involved children, there should be a way to provide employment to such ex-offenders that doesn't involve a risk to the general public.  And maybe a way to "erase" someone's record if they go a certain number of years without committing another crime (sort of like bankruptcy).

              I have a handyman who does work in my home and who I've gotten to know over the years.  He was very upfront when he first started working for us that he had spent time in prison on drug and assault charges when he was younger (I already knew this, but he came very highly recommended from several other people).  He's a really sweet guy, has children and grandchildren and a wife.  He knows that he's made mistakes in his life and continues to pay for them even as he approaches his senior years. He told me how hard it has been to find work over the years, even though he completed several programs in trade-schools in heating/AC repair, electrical work, etc, as well as credits towards a bachelor's degree (which he continues to work on).  Knowing him has really made me realize that our current system just doesn't work. 

              I am not saying that we should let people just walk away from committing crimes, but we have to find a better way to take people who have committed relatively minor crimes and give them the opportunity to succeed.  We especially need this for younger, first-time offenders, those 18 and 19 year-olds who are arrested on drug charges and who have just had those lapses in judgment.  Something that gives offenders the opportunity to really become part of society instead of going straight to prison. 

              Just a thought...

              AR


              --- On Fri, 6/6/08, DCReardon@... <DCReardon@...> wrote:
              From: DCReardon@... <DCReardon@...>
              Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
              To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, June 6, 2008, 7:45 AM

              In this country, if you are a felon, it is almost impossible to get a decent job.  We need a "record shield law" like they have in some other States to allow these people to actually have a chance at re-entry.  This keeps the criminal history shielded from employers.  Because if you are a felon, your resume goes in the trash. And as Ms. Henderson just posted, over 700 people have been released into Trinidad.... ..700 people who are unable to get  into mainstream American life can certainly cause problems.


              -----Original Message-----
              From: A R <arcurlyq@yahoo. com>
              To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Fri, 6 Jun 2008 7:30 am
              Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime

              Also, there was a surge in prison releases recently all over the country.  These were people who were sent to prisons in the early 90s under tougher sentencing laws.  They came out with prison records and no skills (except skills to create more crime), so the only thing they know how to do is return to crime. 

              Crime is up in cities all over the country.  I know the problems we had on our block recently were largely due to people recently released from long stints in prison.  I am all for sending the bad guys to prison, but I also recognize that more has to be done to ensure that, once they do their time, they have the opportunity and skills to work a legitimate job.  And yes, you combine this with a tanking economy and you have a recipe for disaster.

              Does anyone know of what happens in other countries in terms of prison release and job training/opportunit ies?  I am pretty sure that other countries don't have the high recidivism rates that we do. 

              AR

              --- On Thu, 6/5/08, Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@ gmail.com> wrote:
              From: Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@ gmail.com>
              Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
              To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com
              Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 9:24 PM

              Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a decline.  What happened?


              For starters, the economy tanked.  Economy good, less crime (in very general terms).  People have less, some will try to take from others.  Pretty simple, in the long run.  

              2 years ago, people were not feeling quite as "pinched" by the economy.  Now it is a different story.  Same reason that we saw a spike in muggings before Christmas...  

              Taylor


              On Jun 5, 2008, at 2:13 PM, Detria Hutchinson wrote:


              The trite response still does not answer the question as to whether individuals want to live in the United States which guarantees privacy rights or parts of the world where martial law is the norm.  BTW--when the ACLU sues the city and win million dollar lawsuits on behalf of individuals who were stopped, detained, denied access without probable cause, etc.  who do you think will foot that bill. There must be a better and legal way to combat crime.  Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a decline.  What happened?

              --- On Thu, 6/5/08, k.jarrell01@ comcast.net <k.jarrell01@ comcast.net> wrote:
              From: k.jarrell01@ comcast.net <k.jarrell01@ comcast.net>
              Subject: Re: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives Aimed at Reducing Neighborhood Crime
              To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com, MPD-5D@yahoogroups. com
              Cc: "Joshua Maye" <usmarinecorp10@ yahoo.com>
              Date: Thursday, June 5, 2008, 12:43 PM


              Joshua,
              Then don't complain when someone you know is shot!
              Keith Jarrell
              --
              In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. 
              Martin Luther King Jr.
               
              ------------ -- Original message ------------ -- 
              From: Joshua Maye <usmarinecorp10@ yahoo.com> 

              I don't like it because it is to close to being martial law and this is not the Green Zone in Iraq. To tell a citizen that they cannot go into another neighborhood unless they live there is unAmerican, unconstitutional, and a violation of the civil liberties of citizens of the District of Columbia. The Police Department need to find a better way to address the increase in crime in DC, because so-called martial law, will not work for it will entice criminal behavior. You can say, I am articulating the words of the ACLU, but I'm just being real. The ban on handguns in DC ain't work, this so-called martial law will not work either. 
               



            • brian.ions
              Well-stated, Kathy and Taylor. It is good to be respectful of the civil liberties issues, and I believe the Chief, the AG and US Attorney have established
              Message 6 of 21 , Jun 7, 2008
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                Well-stated, Kathy and Taylor.

                It is good to be respectful of the civil liberties issues, and I believe
                the Chief, the AG and US Attorney have established safeguards, and will
                continue to stay on top of those concerns within the community.

                I would just add to my previous post on the subject that vehicular
                *MOBILITY* is a key *enabling* factor for criminal perpetrators (just as
                it is for MPD in crime prevention through increased visibility).

                Blocking, diverting and otherwise disrupting perps' vehicular access --
                and potentially putting their weapons stash hiding spaces (i.e., their
                vehicles) at risk at each checkpoint should all be worthwhile benefits
                of this initiative. Moreover, the intelligence gathered should be
                valuable to both MPD patrol officers and detectives alike.

                (It's likely to give perps some pause when they know their ID and tag
                info may be recorded for future reference.)
                :-o
                Again, there is no Constitutional right to operate a motor vehicle, and
                there is no expectation of privacy when we're on the public streets,
                sideways and alleys. These violent crimes are becoming extremely bold
                and are often seemingly deliberately perpetrated in public, high traffic
                areas to engender fear in potential victims and bystanders.

                Crime will always be with us, and it is always a moving target--
                especially with $4 a gallon gas and milk. We can only strive to reduce
                it to the greatest extent possible.

                This initiative is a fitting, high-profile public safety response from a
                team of smart professionals and community leaders working the current
                problem.

                brian
                on Newton/ 502


                --- In MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com, khenderson029@... wrote:
                >
                > We are in crisis mode and must utilize every available remedy to fight
                > crime. The plan has been reviewed by U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Taylor and
                Interim D.C.
                > Attorney General Peter Nickles and we are assured by Chief Lanier that
                the
                > plan is viable and does not violate anyone's constitutional rights.
                Chief
                > Lanier is responding to our urgent need for increased safety and we
                support her
                > plan.
                >
                > We just had another shooting in the 1200 block of M Street, NE and
                citizens
                > there support the idea of safety checkpoints and wish to see the plan
                > implemented as soon as possible (today if feasible). I expect the ACLU
                to debate the
                > issue and the merits of the plan and speculate about the potential of
                > lawsuits, underscoring their job. We expect our elected officials to
                stand up for
                > us and embrace every reasonable effort to restore public safety. It is
                time
                > for action that protects the citizens of the District of Columbia.
                >
                > Kathy Henderson
                >
                --- In MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com, Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > > Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a
                > > decline. What happened?
                >
                > For starters, the economy tanked. Economy good, less crime (in very
                > general terms). People have less, some will try to take from others.
                > Pretty simple, in the long run.
                >
                > 2 years ago, people were not feeling quite as "pinched" by the
                > economy. Now it is a different story. Same reason that we saw a
                > spike in muggings before Christmas...
                >
                > Taylor
              • arcurlyq@yahoo.com
                VERY well stated. Couldn t have said it better myself! AR Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T ... From: brian.ions Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008
                Message 7 of 21 , Jun 7, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  VERY well stated. Couldn't have said it better myself!

                  AR
                  Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: "brian.ions" <brian.ions@...>

                  Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008 16:45:09
                  To:MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [MPD-5D] Initiatives To Reduce Neighborhood Crime


                  Well-stated, Kathy and Taylor.

                  It is good to be respectful of the civil liberties issues, and I believe
                  the Chief, the AG and US Attorney have established safeguards, and will
                  continue to stay on top of those concerns within the community.

                  I would just add to my previous post on the subject that vehicular
                  *MOBILITY* is a key *enabling* factor for criminal perpetrators (just as
                  it is for MPD in crime prevention through increased visibility).

                  Blocking, diverting and otherwise disrupting perps' vehicular access --
                  and potentially putting their weapons stash hiding spaces (i.e., their
                  vehicles) at risk at each checkpoint should all be worthwhile benefits
                  of this initiative. Moreover, the intelligence gathered should be
                  valuable to both MPD patrol officers and detectives alike.

                  (It's likely to give perps some pause when they know their ID and tag
                  info may be recorded for future reference.)
                  :-o
                  Again, there is no Constitutional right to operate a motor vehicle, and
                  there is no expectation of privacy when we're on the public streets,
                  sideways and alleys. These violent crimes are becoming extremely bold
                  and are often seemingly deliberately perpetrated in public, high traffic
                  areas to engender fear in potential victims and bystanders.

                  Crime will always be with us, and it is always a moving target--
                  especially with $4 a gallon gas and milk. We can only strive to reduce
                  it to the greatest extent possible.

                  This initiative is a fitting, high-profile public safety response from a
                  team of smart professionals and community leaders working the current
                  problem.

                  brian
                  on Newton/ 502

                  --- In MPD-5D@yahoogroups. <mailto:MPD-5D%40yahoogroups.com> com, khenderson029@... wrote:
                  >
                  > We are in crisis mode and must utilize every available remedy to fight
                  > crime. The plan has been reviewed by U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Taylor and
                  Interim D.C.
                  > Attorney General Peter Nickles and we are assured by Chief Lanier that
                  the
                  > plan is viable and does not violate anyone's constitutional rights.
                  Chief
                  > Lanier is responding to our urgent need for increased safety and we
                  support her
                  > plan.
                  >
                  > We just had another shooting in the 1200 block of M Street, NE and
                  citizens
                  > there support the idea of safety checkpoints and wish to see the plan
                  > implemented as soon as possible (today if feasible). I expect the ACLU
                  to debate the
                  > issue and the merits of the plan and speculate about the potential of
                  > lawsuits, underscoring their job. We expect our elected officials to
                  stand up for
                  > us and embrace every reasonable effort to restore public safety. It is
                  time
                  > for action that protects the citizens of the District of Columbia.
                  >
                  > Kathy Henderson
                  >
                  --- In MPD-5D@yahoogroups. <mailto:MPD-5D%40yahoogroups.com> com, Taylor Armstrong <Taylor.Armstrong@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > > Two years ago crime, including violent crime in this city was on a
                  > > decline. What happened?
                  >
                  > For starters, the economy tanked. Economy good, less crime (in very
                  > general terms). People have less, some will try to take from others.
                  > Pretty simple, in the long run.
                  >
                  > 2 years ago, people were not feeling quite as "pinched" by the
                  > economy. Now it is a different story. Same reason that we saw a
                  > spike in muggings before Christmas...
                  >
                  > Taylor
                • Greene, Lamar (MPD)
                  where is this location or block so that we may focus on making more drinking in public arrest. Lamar D. Greene Commander Fifth District
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jun 24, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    where is this location or block so that we may focus on making more drinking in public arrest.

                    Lamar D. Greene
                    Commander
                    Fifth District


                    ________________________________

                    From: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Aaron Watkins
                    Sent: Thu 6/5/2008 9:51 PM
                    To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives To Reduce Crime



                    please tell me where this.
                    -----Original Message-----
                    Date: Thursday, June 05, 2008 10:33:46 pm
                    To: MPD-5D@yahoogroups.com <mailto:MPD-5D%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Subject: [MPD-5D] Re: Expanded Public Safety Initiatives To Reduce Crime
                    From: "k_fw" <k_fw@... <mailto:k_fw%40yahoo.com> >

                    My family and I have been threatened numerous times by people
                    drinking on our street corners and peeing in our alleys. Not all the
                    time, but most of the time the threats come from those who drive cars
                    with MD tags.

                    They tell us to move out of "their" neighborhood. And if we don't,
                    then they claim there will be "tensions." Once we were told we were
                    going to be shot. (The logic is that the neighborhood is "theirs"
                    because they grew up here and we didn't. The fact that we are
                    raising our children here and they aren't is not an effective
                    argument!) So in a way, I welcome this intitiative. My family and I
                    deserve to feel safe in our neighborhood.

                    In another way, I'm not sure how effective this approach will be.
                    Most loiterers claim (and probably do) to have relatives in the
                    neighborhood. Even though they don't seem to be visiting their
                    relatives, I bet they would pass a check-point unscathed. Still I
                    suspect some of the cockiest, rowdiest offenders may act up enough to
                    get their car searched...thereby taking some of the young ones off
                    the street if drugs/weapons were found.

                    But I agree that police permanently dedicated to high-crime areas,
                    who can get to know the regulars, would be the most effective
                    approach to stemming the violence.

                    Still I remain hopeful a solution may be found.
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