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2 Crime Prevention Videos for MPD Listserv Groups

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  • Smith, Yvonne (MPD)
    + Burglary Prevention: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZHSQYtqpXU&feature=related (VIDEO) + Online Holiday Shopping Safety Tips: Scam Alerts:
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 27, 2007
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      2 Crime Prevention Videos for MPD Listserv Groups

      + Burglary Prevention: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZHSQYtqpXU&feature=related (VIDEO)

      + Online Holiday Shopping Safety Tips:

      Scam Alerts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLUh3VPUtHQ (VIDEO)

      What the FBI says you should do if you think you are being scammed:

      Go online and file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center run by the FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center. You can also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and contact your local police. We also recommend that you file a complaint with the retailer.  For more information tips on avoiding fraud and protecting your family from crime, visit our Be Crime Smart webpage.

      + Scam Against Elderly Seeking Tax Help

      Scam Targets Elderly Seeking Tax Help:  http://www.consumeraffairs.com/scam_alerts/scam_alerts.htm (Website)

      Victims lose money and risk identity theft     

              By Mark Huffman
      ConsumerAffairs.Com

      November 16, 2007
      Many seniors seek help preparing their state and
      federal tax returns, especially if that assistance costs little or no money and comes with the promise of a refund. But law enforcement officials warn that scammers are exploitiing that vulnerability and seniors nationwide are falling for it.

      The Social Security Administration reports scam artists are approaching seniors across the country and offering to prepare tax returns for Social Security recipients.

      The victim is instructed to get a 1099 statement for the last three years from Social Security. The SSA has no choice except to provide this information to beneficiaries, although they have been warning anyone who requests this information about the scam.

      Once the intended target receives the information, the scam artist prepares three years of tax returns for a fee. The returns show Social Security benefits as income and mistakenly take the standard deduction to create a refund amount.

      The beneficiary files the faulty tax return and receives a refund from the IRS.

      Once the IRS realizes the error, the refund is either removed from the beneficiary’s bank account or the IRS sends a demand letter for the refund amount. By that point, the scam artist has moved on and the beneficiary is out the $40 to $100 they paid to prepare the return, and they've had to pay back the refund .

      And that may be just the first chapter. Since the scam artist has the victim's personal identity data, including Social Security number, they can open phony credit accounts in the victim's name and possibly get access to bank accounts and other assets.


             

      Yvonne Smith


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