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John and John Jr.

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  • Robert R. Morefield
    Hi Kathy, The John and John Jr. you relate to in the Tax Records raises a question. I copied and posted a will for a John Sr. In the will only one child was
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2001
      Hi Kathy,
      The John and John Jr. you relate to in the Tax Records raises a
      question. I copied and posted a will for a John Sr. In the will only
      one child was mentioned John Jr. Could this be the same John
      Morefield's? If it is then the John Sr. was dead by the date of the
      will in 1812. The William you are speaking about which William would
      it be? I remember seeing a gravemarker of a William A. Moorefield.
      Could that have been him?

      Bob Morefield
    • buttscabin@cstone.net
      Hi Robert, I ll have to go back & find the entry you posted for 1812, but I would guess these would be the same Johns. Personal Prop. Tax Records show 3 Johns
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2001
        Hi Robert,
        I'll have to go back & find the entry you posted for 1812, but I
        would guess these would be the same Johns. Personal Prop. Tax Records
        show 3 Johns in Halifax Co. in 1812 (early spring) but only 2 in 1813
        using John as a given name. The suffix "Sr" is not used. There is a
        John W. listed with William Sr. and (John)Royal on March 12, and an
        older John listed with William on April 3. (I'm not counting John
        Royal since in every record except his marriage record in 1813 to
        Sally Monday, he is listed as Royal). However, this poses a question
        about the two Williams. If the William who married Rebecca Stevens in
        1801 was only 15 or 16, He wouldn't be old enough to be listed as a
        Sr. in 1809, when William Jr. shows up for the first time. It would
        appear that the William who married Rebecca is older than we
        previously thought. IT'S SO CONFUSING!!! Sure wish they had been a
        bit more imaginative in naming their children!
        Kathy
      • seaverp
        ... Tax Records ... 1813 ... is a ... and an ... to ... question ... Stevens in ... as a ... would ... been a ... Kathy, Your observation based on tax records
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 30 7:25 PM
          --- In MOREFIELDHOMEPLACE@y..., buttscabin@c... wrote:
          > Hi Robert,
          > I'll have to go back & find the entry you posted for 1812, but I
          > would guess these would be the same Johns. Personal Prop.
          Tax Records
          > show 3 Johns in Halifax Co. in 1812 (early spring) but only 2 in
          1813
          > using John as a given name. The suffix "Sr" is not used. There
          is a
          > John W. listed with William Sr. and (John)Royal on March 12,
          and an
          > older John listed with William on April 3. (I'm not counting John
          > Royal since in every record except his marriage record in 1813
          to
          > Sally Monday, he is listed as Royal). However, this poses a
          question
          > about the two Williams. If the William who married Rebecca
          Stevens in
          > 1801 was only 15 or 16, He wouldn't be old enough to be listed
          as a
          > Sr. in 1809, when William Jr. shows up for the first time. It
          would
          > appear that the William who married Rebecca is older than we
          > previously thought. IT'S SO CONFUSING!!! Sure wish they had
          been a
          > bit more imaginative in naming their children!
          > Kathy

          Kathy,

          Your observation based on tax records that the William who
          married Rebecca must have been older than 15 or 16 when he
          married in 1801 is a crucial bit of reasoning.

          Marriage records show that Wright married Nancy Stevens in
          Dec 1785 and that William married Rebecca in June 1801.
          Since William was Wright's son, it has been assumed that he
          would have only been 15 or 16 when he married. Rebecca's age
          is given as 70 in the 1850 census, and the 1830 census gives
          her age as 40-50.

          Nancy signed the marriage consent for William and Rebecca,
          with some strange language about "my darter Rebeckar". The
          reason that is most often given for the fact that Nancy signed the
          marriage consent for William & Rebecca's 1801 marriage is that
          Wright was already dead. However, the personal property tax
          records that you posted last fall and winter show that Wright was
          still alive in 1819 (William & Rebecca's son Wright wasn't born
          until 1808, and therefore couldn't be the Wright in those tax
          records).

          Put all of this together and another possible scenario (previously
          discussed here) about William and Rebecca begins to make
          some sense: if William was Wright's son by a previous
          marriage and Rebecca was Nancy's daughter by a previous
          marriage, the language in the consent is not strange, and
          William was not a "child groom".

          Not proof, but there's no proof for the other scenario either.
        • seaverp
          1782 Halifax Personal Property Tax List includes a Jeremiah Stevens and a James Stevens 1785 Halifax Personal Property Tax List includes Jeremiah, but not
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 31 6:46 AM
            1782 Halifax Personal Property Tax List includes a Jeremiah
            Stevens and a James Stevens
            1785 Halifax Personal Property Tax List includes Jeremiah, but
            not James (no other Stevens or Stephens)

            When Nancy Stevens married Wright Morefield in 1785,
            Jeremiah and Molly Stevens were witnesses.

            Theory: Wright Morefield was married before he married Nancy
            Stevens, and Nancy Stevens was married before she married
            Wright.

            What if... Nancy was married to James Stevens, he died
            between 1782 & 1785, and she then married Wright, who was
            also widowed? If William was Wright's son from a previous
            marriage, and Rebecca was Nancy's from a previous marriage,
            William would have been older than 15 when he married
            Rebecca Stevens in 1801, and it would explain the strange
            wording of the 1801 marriage consent, in which Nancy gives
            permission for her "darter Rebeckar" to marry William Morefield.

            Pat (MFLD) Seaver
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