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Russian olive--an invasive species

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  • Kristi DuBois
    Hi Richard, Arla, and others, Chuck is right on with his response. Russian olive has been declared a noxious weed in several areas, including Utah and Colorado
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 1 10:17 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Richard, Arla, and others,

      Chuck is right on with his response.  Russian olive has been declared a noxious weed in several areas, including Utah and Colorado (either statewide or in specific counties).  It can take over a river bottom and crowd out the more valuable native riparian species. 

      Researchers have studied the impacts of this on birds in southeastern Idaho, where they compared Russian olive stands with native peachleaf willow (grows to about the same size and shape as RO, so it should support similar birds).  They found that most of the insect gleaners and cavity nesters had much lower populations, or simply weren't present in the Russian olive stands, because RO doesn't support very many insects and it's hard wood is difficult for woodpeckers to excavate cavities.  I've got a copy of the masters thesis describing this, if anyone is interested.

      I worked for several years in the Salt Lake City area in Utah, including some songbird work along the Jordan River.  The areas dominated by Russian olive lacked or supported only low populations of house wrens, flycatchers, warblers, and downy woodpeckers--to name a few.  Can you imagine a river bottom without house wrens?  That's what we ended up with in Utah!

      In Montana, Peter Lesica studied the invasian of Russian olive along the Marias River.  He traced the invading stands of RO to a shelterbelt planted in the park just below Tiber Dam.  In other words, it doesn't stay where you plant it, and it is spreading in Montana.  Several of us in FWP have been working for years to change attitudes about RO, since FWP has planted it in shelterbelts for upland game birds.  The conservation nursery in Missoula continues to sell it at a low cost to landowners.  Hopefully we will be able to change that in the future.

      One of the things that encourages Russian olive to spread is dewatering of streams (lowering the water table in the surrounding flood plain), which puts the native cottonwoods and willows at a disadvantage.  Climate change will probably make RO invasions worse over time.

      So while Russian olive may seem to provide benefits to some birds, it is at a cost to other species.  In eastern Montana, silver buffalo berry looks similar to Russian olive, but is a native species and is not invasive.  I highly recommend planting silver buffalo berry, rather than RO in shelterbelts and parks.

      We should encourage R4 FWP to continue removing the Russian olive, and replace it with native species.  Although it may be painful to watch the shrubs get ripped out, over time we will have a much healthier bird community in the park in the long run without the Russian olive--as long as it's replaced by native shrubs and trees. 

      Yes, many years ago (early 1980's) I wrote an article for the Upper Missouri Breaks Audubon newsletter, wondering about Russian olive as a nonnative species, but concluding that it didn't seem to be causing any problems.  After working in Utah for 3 years, and watching our Montana riparian habitats slowly fill up with RO over the past 25 years, I've changed my mind!

      Kristi DuBois

      Missoula (formerly from Great Falls)


      At 01:18 PM 2/28/2008, you wrote:

      Richard and all
       
      Concerning the naming of Russian olive as an invasive species. There are many areas along the Missouri River where Russian olive has completely taken over the riparian areas. They form impenetrable thickets where the only thing that grows is Russian olive. Cottonwood, ash and all other native species are eliminated. Last year the Valley County Conservation District stopped selling the tree. Everyone recognizes that the tree provides food for a lot of species, but it is at the cost of creating a monoculture. The tree is spread very easily by birds and every other creature that eats the fruit. In upland, dry areas it may not be as easily spread but it most certainly is a threat to riparian habitats. Hopefully it will be placed on the weed list soon.
       
      Chuck Carlson
      chuckcmt@...
      Ft. Peck  MT
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Richard Mousel
      To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 1:54 PM
      Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Giant Springs Hedge/Windrow update

      Arla: Very well put! Thanks again for bringing this to our attention and
      getting the thinning stopped! With your permission I'd like to see your post
      published in our next newsletter. On a related note, I understand there seems
      to be a new crusade against Russian Olive, as being an invasive species. For
      the most part I haven't noticed this. Can someone point out areas in the Great
      Falls or central Montana area that this is the case? Russian Olive seem to be
      one of the best bird magnets in the area, personally I think the trees are
      very ugly, but if the birds like them so do I.

      On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:36:54 -0700
      Arla Eckert <turtle@...> wrote:
      > Giant Springs Hedge/windrow update
      >
      > I had been to Giant Springs off and on through out the GBBC which ran
      > through Monday the 18th. On Wed. the 20th I headed for the park and to check
      > below Rainbow dam to see if I could find the Green-winged Teal, which had
      > hid, from us for the whole count. I found the hedge/windrow being thinned. I
      > turned around and headed for the FWP office right away. Mat who is the park
      > manager was on vacation and every one with any power was at a meeting in
      > Helena. Someone did call Mat and got the thinning stopped. He had not been
      > given any warning about this project. I have met with Mat since on Monday
      > after he got back. They were taking the Russian Olive out. In so doing a lot
      > of the very tangled native under story plants were cut, mangled, run over
      > etc.

      Sincerely;
      Richard Mousel - rmousel@...
      Wild Bird Mercantile - Recommended by Birds Everywhere!
      1807 3rd St N.W. Great Falls, MT 59404 ph. 406-452-9377
      www.4co.us - Wildlife, Nature, Scenic Photography.

    • Arla Eckert
      They took a lot of other small trees, and understory out along with some Russian Olive. We have a mess on our hands and I could use some help! They used heavy
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 1 10:53 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Re: [MOB-Montana] Russian olive--an invasive species They took a lot of other small trees, and understory out along with some Russian Olive. We have a mess on our hands and I could use some help! They used heavy machines instead of doing a selective cutting. What can be planted that will be good for birds and not be a problem on down the road.  We are having a real problem here in Great Falls in all the parks, they keep taking the understory and mid story areas out.

        Arla


        On 3/1/08 11:17 AM, "Kristi DuBois" <kdubois@...> wrote:

        Hi Richard, Arla, and others,

        Chuck is right on with his response.  Russian olive has been declared a noxious weed in several areas, including Utah and Colorado (either statewide or in specific counties).  It can take over a river bottom and crowd out the more valuable native riparian species.  

        Researchers have studied the impacts of this on birds in southeastern Idaho, where they compared Russian olive stands with native peachleaf willow (grows to about the same size and shape as RO, so it should support similar birds).  They found that most of the insect gleaners and cavity nesters had much lower populations, or simply weren't present in the Russian olive stands, because RO doesn't support very many insects and it's hard wood is difficult for woodpeckers to excavate cavities.  I've got a copy of the masters thesis describing this, if anyone is interested.

        I worked for several years in the Salt Lake City area in Utah, including some songbird work along the Jordan River.  The areas dominated by Russian olive lacked or supported only low populations of house wrens, flycatchers, warblers, and downy woodpeckers--to name a few.  Can you imagine a river bottom without house wrens?  That's what we ended up with in Utah!

        In Montana, Peter Lesica studied the invasian of Russian olive along the Marias River.  He traced the invading stands of RO to a shelterbelt planted in the park just below Tiber Dam.  In other words, it doesn't stay where you plant it, and it is spreading in Montana. Several of us in FWP have been working for years to change attitudes about RO, since FWP has planted it in shelterbelts for upland game birds.  The conservation nursery in Missoula continues to sell it at a low cost to landowners.  Hopefully we will be able to change that in the future.

        One of the things that encourages Russian olive to spread is dewatering of streams (lowering the water table in the surrounding flood plain), which puts the native cottonwoods and willows at a disadvantage. Climate change will probably make RO invasions worse over time.

        So while Russian olive may seem to provide benefits to some birds, it is at a cost to other species.  In eastern Montana, silver buffalo berry looks similar to Russian olive, but is a native species and is not invasive.  I highly recommend planting silver buffalo berry, rather than RO in shelterbelts and parks.

        We should encourage R4 FWP to continue removing the Russian olive, and replace it with native species.  Although it may be painful to watch the shrubs get ripped out, over time we will have a much healthier bird community in the park in the long run without the Russian olive--as long as it's replaced by native shrubs and trees.  

        Yes, many years ago (early 1980's) I wrote an article for the Upper Missouri Breaks Audubon newsletter, wondering about Russian olive as a nonnative species, but concluding that it didn't seem to be causing any problems.  After working in Utah for 3 years, and watching our Montana riparian habitats slowly fill up with RO over the past 25 years, I've changed my mind!

        Kristi DuBois

        Missoula (formerly from Great Falls)


        At 01:18 PM 2/28/2008, you wrote:

        Richard and all
         
        Concerning the naming of Russian olive as an invasive species. There are many areas along the Missouri River where Russian olive has completely taken over the riparian areas. They form impenetrable thickets where the only thing that grows is Russian olive. Cottonwood, ash and all other native species are eliminated. Last year the Valley County Conservation District stopped selling the tree. Everyone recognizes that the tree provides food for a lot of species, but it is at the cost of creating a monoculture. The tree is spread very easily by birds and every other creature that eats the fruit. In upland, dry areas it may not be as easily spread but it most certainly is a threat to riparian habitats. Hopefully it will be placed on the weed list soon.
         
        Chuck Carlson
        chuckcmt@...
        Ft. Peck  MT
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Richard Mousel <mailto:rmousel@...>
        To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 1:54 PM
        Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Giant Springs Hedge/Windrow update

        Arla: Very well put! Thanks again for bringing this to our attention and
        getting the thinning stopped! With your permission I'd like to see your post
        published in our next newsletter. On a related note, I understand there seems
        to be a new crusade against Russian Olive, as being an invasive species. For
        the most part I haven't noticed this. Can someone point out areas in the Great
        Falls or central Montana area that this is the case? Russian Olive seem to be
        one of the best bird magnets in the area, personally I think the trees are
        very ugly, but if the birds like them so do I.

        On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:36:54 -0700
        Arla Eckert <turtle@... <mailto:turtle%40mt.net> > wrote:
        > Giant Springs Hedge/windrow update
        >
        > I had been to Giant Springs off and on through out the GBBC which ran
        > through Monday the 18th. On Wed. the 20th I headed for the park and to check
        > below Rainbow dam to see if I could find the Green-winged Teal, which had
        > hid, from us for the whole count. I found the hedge/windrow being thinned. I
        > turned around and headed for the FWP office right away. Mat who is the park
        > manager was on vacation and every one with any power was at a meeting in
        > Helena. Someone did call Mat and got the thinning stopped. He had not been
        > given any warning about this project. I have met with Mat since on Monday
        > after he got back. They were taking the Russian Olive out. In so doing a lot
        > of the very tangled native under story plants were cut, mangled, run over
        > etc.

        Sincerely;
        Richard Mousel - rmousel@... <mailto:rmousel%40bresnan.net>
        Wild Bird Mercantile - Recommended by Birds Everywhere!
        1807 3rd St N.W. Great Falls, MT 59404 ph. 406-452-9377
        www.4co.us <http://www.4co.us/>  - Wildlife, Nature, Scenic Photography.

         


      • Judy Hoy
        Hi Arla, If Service Berry will grow there it would be good. If it can be watered a little, Chokecherry and wild Hawthorne are good. Some native willows can
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 1 2:01 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Arla,

          If Service Berry will grow there it would be good. If it can be watered
          a little, Chokecherry and wild Hawthorne are good. Some native willows
          can grow without much water and attract insect eating birds. Of course,
          the Buffalo Berry that Kristi recommended is excellent. Birds and some
          butterflies like Rocky Mountain Juniper, but they grow very slowly. A
          variety of bushes and trees will attract more species, of course, if
          the park doesn't have to have everything all the same. We have all of
          the above bushes/trees on our land and at least a few species of birds
          like each of them.

          Judy
          Stevensville, MT
        • Kristi DuBois
          Hi Arla, I obviously missunderstood which shelterbelt had been removed, and which species were involved. Let us know what we can do to help with this
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 1 9:36 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Arla,

            I obviously missunderstood which shelterbelt had been removed, and which species were involved.  Let us know what we can do to help with this situation.  Perhaps if FWP hears from a lot of birders, they will change their park management. 

            It is so important for birders to be involved in management of their local parks and open spaces.  Thanks Arla and everyone else there in Great Falls for watch-dogging this problem.

            Kristi

            At 11:53 AM 3/1/2008, you wrote:

            They took a lot of other small trees, and understory out along with some Russian Olive. We have a mess on our hands and I could use some help! They used heavy machines instead of doing a selective cutting. What can be planted that will be good for birds and not be a problem on down the road.  We are having a real problem here in Great Falls in all the parks, they keep taking the understory and mid story areas out.

            Arla


            On 3/1/08 11:17 AM, "Kristi DuBois" <kdubois@...> wrote:

            Hi Richard, Arla, and others,

            Chuck is right on with his response.  Russian olive has been declared a noxious weed in several areas, including Utah and Colorado (either statewide or in specific counties).  It can take over a river bottom and crowd out the more valuable native riparian species. 

            Researchers have studied the impacts of this on birds in southeastern Idaho, where they compared Russian olive stands with native peachleaf willow (grows to about the same size and shape as RO, so it should support similar birds).  They found that most of the insect gleaners and cavity nesters had much lower populations, or simply weren't present in the Russian olive stands, because RO doesn't support very many insects and it's hard wood is difficult for woodpeckers to excavate cavities.  I've got a copy of the masters thesis describing this, if anyone is interested.

            I worked for several years in the Salt Lake City area in Utah, including some songbird work along the Jordan River.  The areas dominated by Russian olive lacked or supported only low populations of house wrens, flycatchers, warblers, and downy woodpeckers--to name a few.  Can you imagine a river bottom without house wrens?  That's what we ended up with in Utah!

            In Montana, Peter Lesica studied the invasian of Russian olive along the Marias River.  He traced the invading stands of RO to a shelterbelt planted in the park just below Tiber Dam.  In other words, it doesn't stay where you plant it, and it is spreading in Montana. Several of us in FWP have been working for years to change attitudes about RO, since FWP has planted it in shelterbelts for upland game birds.  The conservation nursery in Missoula continues to sell it at a low cost to landowners.  Hopefully we will be able to change that in the future.

            One of the things that encourages Russian olive to spread is dewatering of streams (lowering the water table in the surrounding flood plain), which puts the native cottonwoods and willows at a disadvantage. Climate change will probably make RO invasions worse over time.

            So while Russian olive may seem to provide benefits to some birds, it is at a cost to other species.  In eastern Montana, silver buffalo berry looks similar to Russian olive, but is a native species and is not invasive.  I highly recommend planting silver buffalo berry, rather than RO in shelterbelts and parks.

            We should encourage R4 FWP to continue removing the Russian olive, and replace it with native species.  Although it may be painful to watch the shrubs get ripped out, over time we will have a much healthier bird community in the park in the long run without the Russian olive--as long as it's replaced by native shrubs and trees. 

            Yes, many years ago (early 1980's) I wrote an article for the Upper Missouri Breaks Audubon newsletter, wondering about Russian olive as a nonnative species, but concluding that it didn't seem to be causing any problems.  After working in Utah for 3 years, and watching our Montana riparian habitats slowly fill up with RO over the past 25 years, I've changed my mind!

            Kristi DuBois

            Missoula (formerly from Great Falls)


            At 01:18 PM 2/28/2008, you wrote:

            Richard and all
             
            Concerning the naming of Russian olive as an invasive species. There are many areas along the Missouri River where Russian olive has completely taken over the riparian areas. They form impenetrable thickets where the only thing that grows is Russian olive. Cottonwood, ash and all other native species are eliminated. Last year the Valley County Conservation District stopped selling the tree. Everyone recognizes that the tree provides food for a lot of species, but it is at the cost of creating a monoculture. The tree is spread very easily by birds and every other creature that eats the fruit. In upland, dry areas it may not be as easily spread but it most certainly is a threat to riparian habitats. Hopefully it will be placed on the weed list soon.
             
            Chuck Carlson
            chuckcmt@...
            Ft. Peck  MT
             
            ----- Original Message -----

            From: Richard Mousel < mailto:rmousel@... >
            To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 1:54 PM
            Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Giant Springs Hedge/Windrow update

            Arla: Very well put! Thanks again for bringing this to our attention and
            getting the thinning stopped! With your permission I'd like to see your post
            published in our next newsletter. On a related note, I understand there seems
            to be a new crusade against Russian Olive, as being an invasive species. For
            the most part I haven't noticed this. Can someone point out areas in the Great
            Falls or central Montana area that this is the case? Russian Olive seem to be
            one of the best bird magnets in the area, personally I think the trees are
            very ugly, but if the birds like them so do I.

            On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:36:54 -0700
            Arla Eckert <turtle@... <mailto:turtle%40mt.net> > wrote:
            > Giant Springs Hedge/windrow update
            >
            > I had been to Giant Springs off and on through out the GBBC which ran
            > through Monday the 18th. On Wed. the 20th I headed for the park and to check
            > below Rainbow dam to see if I could find the Green-winged Teal, which had
            > hid, from us for the whole count. I found the hedge/windrow being thinned. I
            > turned around and headed for the FWP office right away. Mat who is the park
            > manager was on vacation and every one with any power was at a meeting in
            > Helena. Someone did call Mat and got the thinning stopped. He had not been
            > given any warning about this project. I have met with Mat since on Monday
            > after he got back. They were taking the Russian Olive out. In so doing a lot
            > of the very tangled native under story plants were cut, mangled, run over
            > etc.

            Sincerely;
            Richard Mousel - rmousel@... < mailto:rmousel%40bresnan.net >
            Wild Bird Mercantile - Recommended by Birds Everywhere!
            1807 3rd St N.W. Great Falls, MT 59404 ph. 406-452-9377
            www.4co.us < http://www.4co.us/>   - Wildlife, Nature, Scenic Photography.

             


          • Arla Eckert
            Thank you for this information. Arla
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 2 7:36 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              Thank you for this information. Arla


              On 3/1/08 3:01 PM, "Judy Hoy" <bjhoy@...> wrote:

              > Hi Arla,
              >
              > If Service Berry will grow there it would be good. If it can be watered
              > a little, Chokecherry and wild Hawthorne are good. Some native willows
              > can grow without much water and attract insect eating birds. Of course,
              > the Buffalo Berry that Kristi recommended is excellent. Birds and some
              > butterflies like Rocky Mountain Juniper, but they grow very slowly. A
              > variety of bushes and trees will attract more species, of course, if
              > the park doesn't have to have everything all the same. We have all of
              > the above bushes/trees on our land and at least a few species of birds
              > like each of them.
              >
              > Judy
              > Stevensville, MT
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Douglas Hansen
              Folks, I cannot quietly stand by and watch while this roomer gets out of hand. No shelterbelt has been removed. Yes, one hedge has been thinned out, and a
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 2 11:15 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                Folks, I cannot quietly stand by and watch while this roomer gets out of hand.  No shelterbelt has been removed.  Yes, one hedge has been thinned out, and a couple of trees (at least one Russian Olive) has been removed.  THE HEDGE IN QUESTION IS STILL THERE!  Just thinned out a bit.  As I have inspected the area in question twice, and I have found evidence of previous thinning activities.  My impression is that this thinning is part of the mission of FWP, at least where its park maintenance is concerned.  I make this statement without the benefit of having spoken directly to FWP officials.
                 
                Further, the rest of the parks in and around Great Falls are not profoundly threatened by the thinning of this one hedge.  Nor am I convinced that all of the rest of these parks are the object of someone's indiscretions.
                 
                My recommendation is to knock it off! 
                 
                When the FWP people see us coming, I'd rather they get the warm fuzzy, as opposed to having these people cringe with animosity.
                 
                Fact is, if the FWP wanted to totally decimate Giant Springs are of all vegetation, they could legally do so.  Granted, they would have to do the paperwork, but they could do so.
                 
                Again, THE HEDGE IS STILL THERE! -- And even the most thinned out areas appear to me to be in good condition.
                 
                Guess what, folks!  This area will grow back!  There was plenty of hedge left to grow back.
                 
                Park maintenance is going to occur whether we approve of it or disapprove of it!
                 
                Douglas J. Hansen
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Saturday, March 01, 2008 10:36 PM
                Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Russian olive--an invasive species

                Hi Arla,

                I obviously missunderstood which shelterbelt had been removed, and which species were involved.  Let us know what we can do to help with this situation.  Perhaps if FWP hears from a lot of birders, they will change their park management. 

                It is so important for birders to be involved in management of their local parks and open spaces.  Thanks Arla and everyone else there in Great Falls for watch-dogging this problem.

                Kristi

                At 11:53 AM 3/1/2008, you wrote:

                They took a lot of other small trees, and understory out along with some Russian Olive. We have a mess on our hands and I could use some help! They used heavy machines instead of doing a selective cutting. What can be planted that will be good for birds and not be a problem on down the road.  We are having a real problem here in Great Falls in all the parks, they keep taking the understory and mid story areas out.

                Arla


                On 3/1/08 11:17 AM, "Kristi DuBois" <kdubois@montana. com> wrote:

                Hi Richard, Arla, and others,

                Chuck is right on with his response.  Russian olive has been declared a noxious weed in several areas, including Utah and Colorado (either statewide or in specific counties).  It can take over a river bottom and crowd out the more valuable native riparian species. 

                Researchers have studied the impacts of this on birds in southeastern Idaho, where they compared Russian olive stands with native peachleaf willow (grows to about the same size and shape as RO, so it should support similar birds).  They found that most of the insect gleaners and cavity nesters had much lower populations, or simply weren't present in the Russian olive stands, because RO doesn't support very many insects and it's hard wood is difficult for woodpeckers to excavate cavities.  I've got a copy of the masters thesis describing this, if anyone is interested.

                I worked for several years in the Salt Lake City area in Utah, including some songbird work along the Jordan River.  The areas dominated by Russian olive lacked or supported only low populations of house wrens, flycatchers, warblers, and downy woodpeckers- -to name a few.  Can you imagine a river bottom without house wrens?  That's what we ended up with in Utah!

                In Montana, Peter Lesica studied the invasian of Russian olive along the Marias River.  He traced the invading stands of RO to a shelterbelt planted in the park just below Tiber Dam.  In other words, it doesn't stay where you plant it, and it is spreading in Montana. Several of us in FWP have been working for years to change attitudes about RO, since FWP has planted it in shelterbelts for upland game birds.  The conservation nursery in Missoula continues to sell it at a low cost to landowners.  Hopefully we will be able to change that in the future.

                One of the things that encourages Russian olive to spread is dewatering of streams (lowering the water table in the surrounding flood plain), which puts the native cottonwoods and willows at a disadvantage. Climate change will probably make RO invasions worse over time.

                So while Russian olive may seem to provide benefits to some birds, it is at a cost to other species.  In eastern Montana, silver buffalo berry looks similar to Russian olive, but is a native species and is not invasive.  I highly recommend planting silver buffalo berry, rather than RO in shelterbelts and parks.

                We should encourage R4 FWP to continue removing the Russian olive, and replace it with native species.  Although it may be painful to watch the shrubs get ripped out, over time we will have a much healthier bird community in the park in the long run without the Russian olive--as long as it's replaced by native shrubs and trees. 

                Yes, many years ago (early 1980's) I wrote an article for the Upper Missouri Breaks Audubon newsletter, wondering about Russian olive as a nonnative species, but concluding that it didn't seem to be causing any problems.  After working in Utah for 3 years, and watching our Montana riparian habitats slowly fill up with RO over the past 25 years, I've changed my mind!

                Kristi DuBois

                Missoula (formerly from Great Falls)


                At 01:18 PM 2/28/2008, you wrote:

                Richard and all

                 
                Concerning the naming of Russian olive as an invasive species. There are many areas along the Missouri River where Russian olive has completely taken over the riparian areas. They form impenetrable thickets where the only thing that grows is Russian olive. Cottonwood, ash and all other native species are eliminated. Last year the Valley County Conservation District stopped selling the tree. Everyone recognizes that the tree provides food for a lot of species, but it is at the cost of creating a monoculture. The tree is spread very easily by birds and every other creature that eats the fruit. In upland, dry areas it may not be as easily spread but it most certainly is a threat to riparian habitats. Hopefully it will be placed on the weed list soon.

                 
                Chuck Carlson
                chuckcmt@nemont. net
                Ft. Peck  MT

                 
                ----- Original Message -----

                From: Richard Mousel < mailto:rmousel@ bresnan.net >
                To: MOB-Montana@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 1:54 PM
                Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Giant Springs Hedge/Windrow update

                Arla: Very well put! Thanks again for bringing this to our attention and
                getting the thinning stopped! With your permission I'd like to see your post
                published in our next newsletter. On a related note, I understand there seems
                to be a new crusade against Russian Olive, as being an invasive species. For
                the most part I haven't noticed this. Can someone point out areas in the Great
                Falls or central Montana area that this is the case? Russian Olive seem to be
                one of the best bird magnets in the area, personally I think the trees are
                very ugly, but if the birds like them so do I.

                On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 11:36:54 -0700
                Arla Eckert <turtle@... <mailto:turtle% 40mt.net> > wrote:
                > Giant Springs Hedge/windrow update
                >
                > I had been to Giant Springs off and on through out the GBBC which ran
                > through Monday the 18th. On Wed. the 20th I headed for the park and to check
                > below Rainbow dam to see if I could find the Green-winged Teal, which had
                > hid, from us for the whole count. I found the hedge/windrow being thinned. I
                > turned around and headed for the FWP office right away. Mat who is the park
                > manager was on vacation and every one with any power was at a meeting in
                > Helena. Someone did call Mat and got the thinning stopped. He had not been
                > given any warning about this project. I have met with Mat since on Monday
                > after he got back. They were taking the Russian Olive out. In so doing a lot
                > of the very tangled native under story plants were cut, mangled, run over
                > etc.

                Sincerely;
                Richard Mousel - rmousel@bresnan. net < mailto:rmousel% 40bresnan. net >
                Wild Bird Mercantile - Recommended by Birds Everywhere!
                1807 3rd St N.W. Great Falls, MT 59404 ph. 406-452-9377
                www.4co.us < http://www.4co. us/>   - Wildlife, Nature, Scenic Photography.



                 

              • John Carlson
                Hi All, I have pasted below the text of a message I received recently which originated with Terry Rich. In particular please note the references to Autumn
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 6 1:58 PM
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                  Hi All,
                  I have pasted below the text of a message I received recently which
                  originated with Terry Rich. In particular please note the references
                  to Autumn Olive, otherwise known as Russian Olive. John

                  Two years ago, while attending an international wildlife conference,
                  I struck up a conversation with the educational director of a state
                  Audubon Society. In the course of the conversation I mentioned the
                  fact that native plants host the insects that support our migratory
                  birds. The young man, a biologist, challenged my statement."Do we
                  know that's true?" he asked.
                  He needs to pick up a copy of Dr. Douglas Tallamy's wonderful new
                  book, Bringing Nature Home (Timber Press, Inc., 2007, $27.95), which
                  recently appeared at bookstores across the country. In it, Tallamy,
                  Professor and Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife
                  Ecology at the University of Delaware, demonstrates the importance of
                  native plants to healthy, viable terrestrial ecosystems. I learned
                  about this book last fall, when I emailed Dr. Tallamy and requested
                  permission to quote an article he had written about the relationship
                  between native plants and the insects they host – and their impact on
                  wildlife, particularly birds. He not only granted permission, he
                  generously sent me a disk with the pre-pub galleys of the book and
                  I've been anxiously awaiting it since. It was well worth the wait.
                  The good professor says in his preface, "Occasionally we encounter a
                  concept so obvious and intuitive that we have never thought to
                  articulate it, so close to our noses that we could not see it, so
                  entangled with our everyday experiences that we did not recognize
                  it." The concept is that because there is too little space left for
                  the wildlife we care about and love to watch, we must make our yards
                  friendlier to the birds, frogs, butterflies and other wild creatures
                  with which we share this planet. With roughly forty million acres of
                  land in American yards, his is a compelling argument.
                  Tallamy appeals to the gardener in all of us to do just that.
                  Although he says that Bringing Nature Home is not a "how-to" book, in
                  a way, it is precisely that. While he does not attempt to instruct
                  us on which plants to use, he takes us step by important step through
                  the crucial reasoning around why we should – indeed, why we must –
                  return as much of our personal property to native plants as
                  possible. We must do that because native plants do (in spite of the
                  above-mentioned biologist's doubt) support the insects upon which
                  those same birds, frogs, butterflies (and all the rest of us for that
                  matter) depend.
                  Dr. Tallamy discovered that link when he and his wife purchased 10
                  acres in southeastern Pennsylvania. The land, previously farmed, was
                  filled with alien plants such as autumn olive, multiflora rose,
                  Bradford pears and others. The vegetation was so dense they had to
                  cut trails through it in order to get inside of it. Then he took a
                  walk along the trails to look for insects. He found virtually none
                  except on the few natives struggling to survive under the
                  stranglehold of invasives. It was a defining moment for him and he
                  began to present programs to educate the general public about his
                  discovery. The pamphlet he made up to hand out at those
                  presentations eventually grew into the book.
                  Birders who still support the idea that autumn olive is good for
                  birds – and there are a lot of them out there – will gain insight
                  from the following, "…the foliage of autumn olive is inedible for
                  almost all native insect herbivores. A field rich in goldenrod, Joe-
                  Pye weed, boneset, milkweed, black-eyed Susan, and dozens of other
                  productive perennials supplies copious amounts of insect biomass for
                  birds to rear their young. After it has been invaded by autumn or
                  Russian olive, that same field is virtually sterile."
                  Filled with beautiful photographs of insects, plants, birds, and hard
                  data presented in an easy to read style, Bringing Nature Home is a
                  book every conservationist should read carefully.
                  And every conservation educator must, as Tallamy himself has done,
                  incorporate its message into his or her material and presentations.
                • Douglas Hansen
                  In a way, I am glad that I cannot add more to the concept of Russian Olive eradication. The hedge project, as previously discussed (at Giant Springs), does
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 6 2:34 PM
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                    In a way, I am glad that I cannot add more to the concept of Russian
                    Olive eradication.

                    The hedge project, as previously discussed (at Giant Springs), does
                    include the eradication of Russian Olives. In order to get at the
                    ROs some of the undergrowth must be removed. The facility manager
                    and the hired arborist have both been of the opinion that the
                    undergrowth will grow back fairly quickly.

                    Last night, at the UMBA Board meeting, I suggested that the UMBA take
                    a proactive approach to growing back the undergrowth. That is, if
                    the UMBA can assist with a planting of a native species in order to
                    expedite regrowth of the lost undergrowth, we would do so.

                    Where the regrowth goes, or whether it goes at all, we will just have
                    to see. I want to have the highest confidence in the manager's
                    optimism in the predicted regrowth.

                    Thank you, John, for your input.

                    --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "John Carlson" <jccarlson@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi All,
                    > I have pasted below the text of a message I received recently which
                    > originated with Terry Rich. In particular please note the
                    references
                    > to Autumn Olive, otherwise known as Russian Olive. John
                    >
                    > Two years ago, while attending an international wildlife
                    conference,
                    > I struck up a conversation with the educational director of a state
                    > Audubon Society. In the course of the conversation I mentioned the
                    > fact that native plants host the insects that support our migratory
                    > birds. The young man, a biologist, challenged my statement."Do we
                    > know that's true?" he asked.
                    > He needs to pick up a copy of Dr. Douglas Tallamy's wonderful new
                    > book, Bringing Nature Home (Timber Press, Inc., 2007, $27.95),
                    which
                    > recently appeared at bookstores across the country. In it,
                    Tallamy,
                    > Professor and Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife
                    > Ecology at the University of Delaware, demonstrates the importance
                    of
                    > native plants to healthy, viable terrestrial ecosystems. I learned
                    > about this book last fall, when I emailed Dr. Tallamy and requested
                    > permission to quote an article he had written about the
                    relationship
                    > between native plants and the insects they host – and their impact
                    on
                    > wildlife, particularly birds. He not only granted permission, he
                    > generously sent me a disk with the pre-pub galleys of the book and
                    > I've been anxiously awaiting it since. It was well worth the wait.
                    > The good professor says in his preface, "Occasionally we encounter
                    a
                    > concept so obvious and intuitive that we have never thought to
                    > articulate it, so close to our noses that we could not see it, so
                    > entangled with our everyday experiences that we did not recognize
                    > it." The concept is that because there is too little space left
                    for
                    > the wildlife we care about and love to watch, we must make our
                    yards
                    > friendlier to the birds, frogs, butterflies and other wild
                    creatures
                    > with which we share this planet. With roughly forty million acres
                    of
                    > land in American yards, his is a compelling argument.
                    > Tallamy appeals to the gardener in all of us to do just that.
                    > Although he says that Bringing Nature Home is not a "how-to" book,
                    in
                    > a way, it is precisely that. While he does not attempt to instruct
                    > us on which plants to use, he takes us step by important step
                    through
                    > the crucial reasoning around why we should – indeed, why we must –
                    > return as much of our personal property to native plants as
                    > possible. We must do that because native plants do (in spite of
                    the
                    > above-mentioned biologist's doubt) support the insects upon which
                    > those same birds, frogs, butterflies (and all the rest of us for
                    that
                    > matter) depend.
                    > Dr. Tallamy discovered that link when he and his wife purchased 10
                    > acres in southeastern Pennsylvania. The land, previously farmed,
                    was
                    > filled with alien plants such as autumn olive, multiflora rose,
                    > Bradford pears and others. The vegetation was so dense they had to
                    > cut trails through it in order to get inside of it. Then he took a
                    > walk along the trails to look for insects. He found virtually none
                    > except on the few natives struggling to survive under the
                    > stranglehold of invasives. It was a defining moment for him and he
                    > began to present programs to educate the general public about his
                    > discovery. The pamphlet he made up to hand out at those
                    > presentations eventually grew into the book.
                    > Birders who still support the idea that autumn olive is good for
                    > birds – and there are a lot of them out there – will gain insight
                    > from the following, "…the foliage of autumn olive is inedible for
                    > almost all native insect herbivores. A field rich in goldenrod,
                    Joe-
                    > Pye weed, boneset, milkweed, black-eyed Susan, and dozens of other
                    > productive perennials supplies copious amounts of insect biomass
                    for
                    > birds to rear their young. After it has been invaded by autumn or
                    > Russian olive, that same field is virtually sterile."
                    > Filled with beautiful photographs of insects, plants, birds, and
                    hard
                    > data presented in an easy to read style, Bringing Nature Home is a
                    > book every conservationist should read carefully.
                    > And every conservation educator must, as Tallamy himself has done,
                    > incorporate its message into his or her material and presentations.
                    >
                  • Mike and Stephanie Becker
                    John, I ve just got to some older emails this week, incredibly, and want to thank you for this cogent review--I will NEVER plant an ornamental again! And I m
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 19, 2008
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                      John,
                      I've just got to some older emails this week, incredibly, and want to thank you for this cogent review--I will NEVER plant an ornamental again!  And I'm going to get that book.  As the author says, it's plain as day but we never see those types of things, I guess.
                      Mike Becker
                      Harrison 



                      To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com
                      From: jccarlson@...
                      Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2008 21:58:27 +0000
                      Subject: [MOB-Montana] Re: Russian olive--an invasive species

                      Hi All,
                      I have pasted below the text of a message I received recently which
                      originated with Terry Rich. In particular please note the references
                      to Autumn Olive, otherwise known as Russian Olive. John

                      Two years ago, while attending an international wildlife conference,
                      I struck up a conversation with the educational director of a state
                      Audubon Society. In the course of the conversation I mentioned the
                      fact that native plants host the insects that support our migratory
                      birds. The young man, a biologist, challenged my statement."Do we
                      know that's true?" he asked.
                      He needs to pick up a copy of Dr. Douglas Tallamy's wonderful new
                      book, Bringing Nature Home (Timber Press, Inc., 2007, $27.95), which
                      recently appeared at bookstores across the country. In it, Tallamy,
                      Professor and Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife
                      Ecology at the University of Delaware, demonstrates the importance of
                      native plants to healthy, viable terrestrial ecosystems. I learned
                      about this book last fall, when I emailed Dr. Tallamy and requested
                      permission to quote an article he had written about the relationship
                      between native plants and the insects they host – and their impact on
                      wildlife, particularly birds. He not only granted permission, he
                      generously sent me a disk with the pre-pub galleys of the book and
                      I've been anxiously awaiting it since. It was well worth the wait.
                      The good professor says in his preface, "Occasionally we encounter a
                      concept so obvious and intuitive that we have never thought to
                      articulate it, so close to our noses that we could not see it, so
                      entangled with our everyday experiences that we did not recognize
                      it." The concept is that because there is too little space left for
                      the wildlife we care about and love to watch, we must make our yards
                      friendlier to the birds, frogs, butterflies and other wild creatures
                      with which we share this planet. With roughly forty million acres of
                      land in American yards, his is a compelling argument.
                      Tallamy appeals to the gardener in all of us to do just that.
                      Although he says that Bringing Nature Home is not a "how-to" book, in
                      a way, it is precisely that. While he does not attempt to instruct
                      us on which plants to use, he takes us step by important step through
                      the crucial reasoning around why we should – indeed, why we must –
                      return as much of our personal property to native plants as
                      possible. We must do that because native plants do (in spite of the
                      above-mentioned biologist's doubt) support the insects upon which
                      those same birds, frogs, butterflies (and all the rest of us for that
                      matter) depend.
                      Dr. Tallamy discovered that link when he and his wife purchased 10
                      acres in southeastern Pennsylvania. The land, previously farmed, was
                      filled with alien plants such as autumn olive, multiflora rose,
                      Bradford pears and others. The vegetation was so dense they had to
                      cut trails through it in order to get inside of it. Then he took a
                      walk along the trails to look for insects. He found virtually none
                      except on the few natives struggling to survive under the
                      stranglehold of invasives. It was a defining moment for him and he
                      began to present programs to educate the general public about his
                      discovery. The pamphlet he made up to hand out at those
                      presentations eventually grew into the book.
                      Birders who still support the idea that autumn olive is good for
                      birds – and there are a lot of them out there – will gain insight
                      from the following, "…the foliage of autumn olive is inedible for
                      almost all native insect herbivores. A field rich in goldenrod, Joe-
                      Pye weed, boneset, milkweed, black-eyed Susan, and dozens of other
                      productive perennials supplies copious amounts of insect biomass for
                      birds to rear their young. After it has been invaded by autumn or
                      Russian olive, that same field is virtually sterile."
                      Filled with beautiful photographs of insects, plants, birds, and hard
                      data presented in an easy to read style, Bringing Nature Home is a
                      book every conservationist should read carefully.
                      And every conservation educator must, as Tallamy himself has done,
                      incorporate its message into his or her material and presentations.





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